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Remembering Nick Adenhart


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Remembering what could have been a bright future for a young man in this organization and more importantly, in life.

Here's some stories and video put together by AngelsWin.com over the years. 

I wrote this the day of his start and tragic accident that took his life and two others that night.

Adenhart gives it another try

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By Chuck Richter - Angelswin.com Executive Editor

Nick Adenhart will take the mound for the Angels tonight against the A's. The 22-year-old right-hander made three starts last season for the Angels (1-1), going 1-0 with a 9.00 ERA, but he hopes to put all that behind him and attack hitters from the get go with his above average stuff.

Adenhart made his major league debut on May 1, 2008 in a 15-8 loss to Oakland, and lasted only two-plus innings. He was tagged for five runs and three hits, but didn’t receive a decision.

Nick learned a lot from his experience last season in the big leagues and gets another shot to prove he can have success much like he did in his first four starts in Salt Lake last year, before the 2008 minor league season and most recently in spring training last month - showing everyone why scouts touted Nick as a "frontline pitcher" going into the 2008 minor league season.

Eddie Bane recently had this to say about Nick in our last Eddie Bane Connection feature. "Nick Adenhart is as good a pitching prospect as the game has. He is about the same age as the college guys I am chasing right now. And he has already touched the big leagues. So far in the spring, from what I hear his stuff has been dynamite as always. When Nick gets ahead of the count with a pitch low and in the middle of the plate, he will win consistently in the major leagues. His stuff is top drawer and, specifically, his fastball gets on the hitters".

Several reports out of spring training were positive surrounding Nick Adenhart. He didn't nibble as much, he challenged hitters with his 93-96 MPH fastball and he pitched effectively backwards in the count, throwing changeups and curveballs in the strike zone generating whiffs, weak ground balls and pop ups. Nick has all the potential in the world to be a top tier pitcher in the big leagues going forward, most scouts believe his strikeout totals will improve as he challenges hitters more. Adenhart despite his poor season last year is still as poised as they come on the mound. He showed that in a few innings in Arizona, getting out of jams with the strikeout.

A simple change to his approach on the hill in attacking the strike zone rather than getting opposing hitters to chase his pitches should result in success for Adenhart in 2009.

With injuries to John Lackey, Ervin Santana and Kelvim Escobar at the start of the season, the Angels are counting on innings from Adenhart until they're back. Since Dustin Moseley and Shane Loux are out of options, if Nick performs well he'll shoot to the top of the depth chart as the first to be called upon after the big three get back if there is an unexpected injury in the rotation. If Adenhart progresses he could claim a rotation spot in 2010 should Lackey and/or Escobar leave via free agency after the 2009 season.

Adenhart's opponent tonight will be Dana Eveland. The left-hander faced the Angels three times last season and failed to pitch past the sixth inning each time, going 0-2 with a 6.06 ERA.

Go get em tonight, Nick.

 

 

A year ago, fans mourned the loss of Adenhart

AdenhartMontage1.jpg
 
Eric Carpenter of the Orange County Register and I talked on the phone the other day about a feature which ran today titled 1 year later, fans remember Adenhart. In his feature story he quoted the following from our phone conversation.
 
Shortly after sunrise, fans began gathering outside Angel Stadium.

Many more tried to comfort one another online.

"That morning, it was a shock to all of us. I remember calling a few people and saying, 'Did this really happen?'" said Chuck Richter, 39, founder of a popular fan site AngelsWin.com and an Angels fan since he was 9.

"We were all rooting for him and he was just blossoming," Richter said.

"To lose somebody at such a young age who showed so much promise ... It was crushing to all of us."

Fans began posting on his Web site. The initial thread grew to at least 30 pages – more than 300 posts from fans expressing condolences.

"I'm really thankful that message board was there," Richter said. "So many Angel fans came there to grieve."
 
Let's go back a year to read some of the Blog columns and Angels' fan discussions from that day at AngelsWin.com.
 
The day of Adenhart's dominant start against the Oakland A's, I posted this column on April 8th several hours before game time. Read Eddie Bane's comments on Nick from spring training in 2009 and the entire article by clicking on the "Adenhart gives it another try" link.
 
Adenhart gives it another try"Eddie Bane recently had this to say about Nick in our last Eddie Bane Connection feature. "Nick Adenhart is as good a pitching prospect as the game has. He is about the same age as the college guys I am chasing right now. And he has already touched the big leagues. So far in the spring, from what I hear his stuff has been dynamite as always. When Nick gets ahead of the count with a pitch low and in the middle of the plate, he will win consistently in the major leagues. His stuff is top drawer and, specifically, his fastball gets on the hitters".
 
 Nick Adenhart killed in car accident: Posted on April 9th at 6:44 A.M. - "Someone just called into am830 and claimed he worked security at UCI medical in orange and said that adenhart was brought in after a fatal car accident. I tried to find info online and found a few fatal car accidents in the area but no names were released. I hope the guy was full of it but wanted to see if anyone else has heard anything."
 
Nick Adenhart 1986-2009: From a Mariners fan that stopped by: Halo fans ~

Words just can't express...

I saw the rumors in the original thread, reading on the bus on my way to work.  Then when the news was oficially confirmed, I audibly caught my breath. I always say that I never root for injuries/illness for any team, as I want my team to engage their competition when both are at 100%.  Obviously, this tragedy is at a whole other level than an elbow sprain or a hamstring tear.  It certainly brings baseball into perspective ... 22 years old ~ baseball star or college student or ditch digger ~ is WAY too young to go.  I have a daughter who is 2 years older than Nick and one two years younger - sometimes things seem to happen in such a bassackward order.

I can't imagine the shock and sorrow Nick's friends and family must be feeling, including that of his extended family in the Halo organization and all their fans.

Sincere heartfelt thoughts and prayers ... 
I just keep hearing Billy Joel in my head ~ Only the good die young.

R.I.P. Nick 
 
Sharing My Thoughts with My AngelsWin Family: Lou Garcia from AngelsWin.com - "Well, it's taking me all day, but i can finally post my thoughts. I refrained from posting earlier  because i was deeply saddened and  numb, as well as extremely angry.  Why things like this happen i will never understand.  But it's not really for me to figure out, i guess.   Nick will be missed by a lot of people - especially his wonderful family.  By all accounts, he was a great kid. We toss around the phrase " Angels Family" quite a bit, but we are definitely in this together.

As some here are aware of,  I have had quite a few people in my life pass away unexpectedly and it doesn't get any easier. I guess this is why i don't rant or fly off the handle after a loss... even an excruciating one like last night.  You learn that where something like the game of baseball is concerned, there will always be another game.  I got what i wanted - one World Series Championship.  I will gladly take more, but will be happy knowing that the Angels are a top-notch organization, both on and off the field.

Please take this time to not only remember and mourn for Nick and his family, but to share all of your Love with your family and friends. 

Also take time to remember those less fortunate than us.  To quote John Wooden: " You can't live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you."
 
Nick Adenhart, you will be missed: Phillip Richmond from Cedar Rapids, Iowa: "Like for all Angels fans, the day Nick Adenhart was announced dead after being hit by a drunk driver, killing two others and seriously injuring another, it has just been a shock, almost unbelievable that he's gone. Here are the thoughts that I wrote on the day Nick went from being heavenly on the mound to supernatural in high places:

I was awoken by a text from my friend Mike, who goes to as many Midwest League games as I do. When I read his text I couldn’t believe it and thought it was just a joke of poor taste. But when I saw that I had several more texts from friends, telling me about what had happened, my day living in shock had begun."
 
The Day Angels Baseball died"I have sat here thinking about the tragic events of late Wednesday evening; about the few unfortunate moments that took the life of Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart and two of his companions and left another in critical condition; of sheer senselessness of three lives being snuffed out by a repeat offender, who otherwise deserves no further mention. However, what I’ve perhaps given the most thought is why this has affected me so much."
 
Baseball marked it's time"As I sit here at the keyboard, my stomach still churning from today’s tragic news, I can’t help but think of Mike Scioscia, and his ability to turn the page. Whether it’s a tough loss, a blowout, or a rainout, he just channels the mantra of turning the page. As hard as it may be, in order to move on past today, we need to get back into our regular routines. Life and baseball still happen, and to honor both it’s worth looking at how our minor league teams fared.

While last night's major league game was canceled, life still went on for the rest of organization. And, while the loss of Adenhart still stings, our minor leaguers had to roll on, whether they knew Adenhart or had never even played with him. For many, it was an extremely emotional day."

 

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By David Saltzer - AngelsWin.com Columnist

After clinching a playoff berth for the 5th time in 6 years, the Angels celebrated. But, before they celebrated, they heard Mike Scioscia give some poignant words about their fallen teammate, Nick Adenhart. Scioscia told the team that the victory belonged as much to them as it did to Nick Adenhart.

While considered an ironic act by some, and in poor taste by a few, the team celebrated with Nick Adenhart. In the clubhouse, they sprayed his jersey with beer and champagne. And then, as they came out to the fans in the stadium, they ran en masse out to centerfield to touch Adenhart and remember him in an even more physical manner. They honored him as if he were there in person to share in the moment.

As a long-time Angels fan, watching the team run out to centerfield brought back an important aspect to being an Angels fan: the family connection of the team. We really haven’t seen that sentiment in Anaheim since the days when Gene Autry ran the team.

Growing up, it wasn’t always easy being an Angels fan. We didn’t have the storied history and traditions of the Dodgers. By and large we were the forgotten step-child of Southern California Baseball. But, what the Angels lacked in baseball tradition, they more than made up with a great owner and a family connection between all of the players, the owner, and the fans. 

Unlike the Dodgers, the Angels’ players from the 70s and 80s acted like a team. We had Gene Autry who was a great owner for both the fans and the players. He created a positive environment for the players and a welcoming environment for the fans. I once talked to Mr. Autry about it and he told me that not only did he want the best athletes on his team, he wanted the best people on his team.

During the Autry era, the Angels were known for their charitable work. But, unlike most athletes at the time, they did their work in relative silence. They didn’t do these things to rehab their image as so many celebrities do today. They did it because it was the right thing to do.

In fact, in many cases, specific players made it abundantly clear that if anyone revealed their activity that they would actually stop performing the services as they believed that such publicity would detract from their efforts. As a recipient of many of those charitable acts, I deeply appreciated that the players were doing it because it was the right thing and because they cared—not because they wanted to use me for an ulterior purpose.

Additionally, it was very common to see the players and their families acting as one big Angels’ family. I used to sit over in what was known as the “players’ wives’� section and it was always amazing to see how the families all helped each other out. Under Mr. Autry, it was expected that the players and their families would be a part of the community and part of the team’s family. They would help the new players and minor leaguers find places to live and show them around the community. They helped minor leaguers, who often arrived with little more than a suitcase, get settled in. They treated each other as family. And then they got them all connected with some charitable activity to do. That was part of their Angels’ family connection.

In today’s era of free agency, it’s hard to imagine what it was like to be a fan of the team back then. It had a different feel. Sure, we had our free agent signings. But, once they got here, the players became part of our family. They all talked about wanting to win one for the Cowboy, and the fans all felt connected to the team. The Cowboy knew them and wanted them to succeed. He often spent time just talking and listening to the players.

Last night, watching the players run out to celebrate with Adenhart, newer fans got a chance to see what the Angels of yore were like. They played with heart and they celebrated as a team. They weren’t a collection of individuals and they didn’t leave anyone out. Like in the old days, the players included the owner in their celebration as well. And they didn’t forget their injured comrades—they brought out Scot Shields’ jersey too.

Arte Moreno has done a lot to bring the Angels family back together—he’s been a player’s owner just like Gene Autry. We as fans have been lucky to have him. Artie made the long overdue peace with Brian Downing and inducted him into the Angels’ Hall of Fame. He’s signed the players and made the stadium a fun and exciting place to be. And, he’s brought us a winning tradition.

Last night, seeing the Angels celebrate with Adenhart brought back a feeling that had been absent for many years. For one moment the team celebrated in the raw emotion and shared it with the fans. Once again, they were a family united to win it all.
 
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By Angelswin.com Photographer & Contributor - Phillip Richmond

Like for all Angels fans, the day Nick Adenhart was announced dead after being hit by a drunk driver, killing two others and seriously injuring another, it has just been a shock, almost unbelievable that he's gone. Here are the thoughts that I wrote on the day Nick went from being heavenly on the mound to supernatural in high places:

I was awoken by a text from my friend Mike, who goes to as many Midwest League games as I do. When I read his text I couldn’t believe it and thought it was just a joke of poor taste. But when I saw that I had several more texts from friends, telling me about what had happened, my day living in shock had begun.

Perhaps the reason I still can’t believe it is because when things like this happen you don’t expect it to be one of your favorite players, so you're not sure how you deal with it. The fact that Nick finally had his moment in just his fourth game may have added to the effect, as well. It was this moment I had been waiting three years to see and was really looking forward to seeing some point this season when the Angels come to my area of the country.

During the quick few months that Nick was in Cedar Rapids, I had gotten to know him. The connection started the same way it has with other players; I’ll have photos and sometimes other items for players to sign and when they finish signing, I give them a CD with all photos I took of them and maybe some copies of the photos I had them sign. Sometimes the players are more grateful for me giving them photos than I am for them signing. Many times this results in players giving me equipment or even money voluntarily in exchange for the photos, which they often forward to loved ones back home.

Eventually it got to the point where I would chat with him about anything, from baseball to life, when he would be sitting in the stands charting during his off days. I was more impressed with his personality than I was with his playing ability. While watching the news coverage on the incident, I have not heard one thing that in any way contradicts what I’d experienced when talking to him. When I heard Brad Coon speak of his humor on Baseball Tonight, I was reminded of the time during a cold April night here in Iowa when I was sitting near the Kernels dugout, talking to Tommy Mendoza’s parents while Nick was sitting behind home plate charting. A little kid approached Mr. Mendoza and called him an expletive in Spanish. When Mendoza replied in astonishment, “What?� the kid pointed to Nick, who had a huge grin on his face, and told Mr. Mendoza, “He told me to say that to you.�

Shortly after Nick was promoted from Cedar Rapids, he was selected to the All-Star Futures Game. My dad and I had considered making the drive to Pittsburgh to go to the game, but now we were sure we had to go. Prior to leaving for Pittsburgh, we went to the Kernels shop and bought a Kernels No. 21 jersey, because if I was ever sure of one player that would succeed in the Majors, it was Nick and I wanted him to sign the jersey. Like all Futures Game participants, Nick made his way down the foul line to sign autographs. Unfortunately, he was signing on the World team’s side of the field while I was getting autographs of future stars like Stephen Drew on the USA side. After making my way over to the World side, I stuck the jersey out for him to sign. He immediately looked up with a huge smile and said “Hey man! How are you doing? Good to see you out here!� While Nick continued to sign for fans, we chatted a little to catch up on the past month before Nick had to take off to wait in the bullpen for his opportunity to shine. Nick did not get the call in the game, but I still enjoyed the game.

I was only able to meet up with him once more, this time in 2008 when Salt Lake came to Iowa. When he told me he’d be pitching the next day, I knew I had to make the two hour drive again to see him pitch. The dominating Nick Adenhart that I had seen two years prior was just not there on the mound that day, much like he was not after being called up to the Majors in May. Talking to him after the game, it just seemed like the rough 2008 he had was mentally wearing him down.

During my trip to Arizona last month I was lucky enough to see Nick pitch two solid games. He was back. I did not make it a priority to greet him this time around, but I now wish I had.

Just a couple of hours ago my shock turned into sadness. Maybe it’s been building from me looking at that signed Kernels No. 21 jersey on my wall. Maybe it was that Angels cap that I took off after coaching some pitchers at my high school today, working on making their curveballs get the sharp and nasty 12-6 break like Nick had. Or even because that hat reminds me of the only reason I really follow the Angels as one of my teams, second to the Cubs — Nick.

It's been a while since I've watched the movie "Field of Dreams," but after thinking about the tragedy, I was reminded of the film. I chose to watch "Field of Dreams" because this whole thing has reminded me of Doc “Moonlight� Graham. Moonlight had made it to the Major Leagues, but never really lived out his dream. At the Field of Dreams, Moonlight accomplished his dream and then was no longer able to do more. Unfortunately for Nick, it wasn’t by his choice. In the movie, after Graham left his dream, he was walking toward the cornfield and then he was stopped by Shoeless Joe Jackson who said, "Hey rookie! You were good."

 

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By Thomas Crow - Angelswin.com Contributor

I have sat here thinking about the tragic events of late Wednesday evening; about the few unfortunate moments that took the life of Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart and two of his companions and left another in critical condition; of sheer senselessness of three lives being snuffed out by a repeat offender, who otherwise deserves no further mention. However, what I’ve perhaps given the most thought is why this has affected me so much.

When I read speculation regarding the incident I hoped for the best — not that three people wouldn't die, as that was already assured — instead it was a diminishing hope that it wasn't Nick. This wasn't for baseball reasons, as at that point I didn't care if he ever threw another pitch. It was true concern for his wellbeing. When the news of his passing came, I felt immediate grief. I spent the rest of the day numb and in denial that this could have happened. But why? 

This thought, of course, struck me immediately as selfish. Further thought made me wonder if my grief itself wasn’t selfish. Who am I to feel this way? It isn't like I knew any of them personally. Why should I feel this way about relative strangers when there is so much death around us everyday that we take for granted. What makes them so unique as to deserve special consideration? 

Reading reactions on our and others’ message boards, and especially watching reactions from all around baseball, made me aware that I wasn't alone feeling this way. This gave me a great deal of comfort. I still didn't understand why I felt this way, though. I then found myself humming the chorus to American Pie. For some reason it all started to make sense; at least as much as something like this really could make sense.

Being in my early 30s, I of course have heard about the event that served as inspiration for the famous song. However, being so long ago, it never really resonated with me. Sure it was a sad story and a huge blow to overall contributions to music, but it never connected with me on a personal level. However, for many even now it holds a powerful meaning. In my opinion this is because the story was so overwhelmingly tragic that they couldn't avoid reacting to it.

To function as a society we have learned to live with all the tragedy around us by becoming oblivious to it. It isn't that we don't care, but instead disassociate our emotions in regards all these events. This is not a bad thing, as otherwise we'd be so overcome with feelings as to be unable to perform the necessary task to continue living. But we are not completely impervious. Adenhart's death has proven this again to be true.

His death, coming hours after a start that finally demonstrated he belonged in the majors after years of hard work, was horrible; the unfulfilled potential that was in front of him, terrible; the affect on his family, his baseball organization and fellow Angels and baseball fans, devastating; the needlessness of his and his friends’ deaths, untenable. To attempt to absorb the impact of it all is impossible. To attempt to encompass it all seems folly. So, we mourn not only this 22-year-old, but everything his death represents.

We, as fans, have again lost any semblance of innocence. Our feeling of safety has had its veil lifted away; our belief and faith that everything will work our right shaken to the core. If any solace, though, is to be found right now, it is perhaps this: while time may heal all wounds, this wound seems so deep as to ensure that Nick will not be forgotten.

 

 

More....

 

http://angelswinblog.blogspot.com/2012/04/nick-adenhart-3-years-later.html

 

http://angelswinblog.blogspot.com/2009/04/baseball-marked-its-time.html

 

http://angelswinblog.blogspot.com/2010/04/this-day-in-angels-baseball-april-9th.html

 

http://angelswinblog.blogspot.com/2010/01/loss.html

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I still remember that game and the A's getting at least a runner on every inning.

 

Without looking at the box score..I'm pretty sure Fuentes blew it.

 

Other than a start the year before I didn't know much about him. A couple Angel fans mentioned him from time to time.

 

I wake up the next morning seeing what sfgate had to say about the game last night and the 4th game today (don't know what I was on that site)..than I see a headline with Nick Adenhart and I'm just thinking "Why's he on the front page of a San Francisco paper"?

 

I read on further..come on here...maybe 500 replies about 2 hours in..I still wouldn't be surprised if it was the most looked at post for this site.

 

It was just a lame ass freak thing and I think most A's fans feel the same way as I when they see him striking out Eric Chavez and Travis Buck 12 hours before, than this? Just terrible seeing all those kids, than the calling all angels song they always do.

 

The only thing I think the Angels/mlb should do differently is leave his number either on the mound or his picture on the wall (maybe just for this day).

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It's bugged me since the end of the '09 season we haven't done more to create lasting memories of Nick. I'll never forget and I'm sure nobody else here will, but there needs to be something there for newer and younger fans. If there's anything at the stadium they've done a damn good job of hiding it (there's not anything, is there?). I'm sure it hasn't privately, but I feel we've let it slip from public memory far too easily.

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Weird that today falls on the day of the 2013 Home Opener.  I know a lot of your are going to the game tonight and/or to OC Sports Grill for the bash we're having there.  

 

Tear it up!  Have a great time!  Celebrate the return of Angels baseball to the Big A.  But please please please ... don't drink and drive.  Get your plan together now.  Get a designated driver.  Plan to call a cab.  Whatever ... just don't get behind the wheel intoxicated. 

 

RIP Nick.  We have never and will never forget you.

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Nick Adenhart's Last Inning...April 8, 2009 
 
 Top 6th: Oakland 
 - T. Buck struck out swinging 
 - M. Ellis flied out to center 
 - R. Davis grounded out to third 
 
 
 7 pitches, all strikes
 0 runs, 0 hits, 0 errors 
 Oakland 0, LA Angels 3

 

What a game, what a pitching performance ... until it was handed over to the bullpen. 

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A Tribute to Nick Adenhart
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By Ellen Bell

Four years ago, I had just started writing an Angels blog for the Orange County Register when the news of Nick Adenhart’s death changed the story. Suddenly, the festivities of a new baseball season was no longer important and I found myself writing about the wave of grief that covered Angels fans. I also tried to describe the effect that this young pitchers tragic death had on me personally. 

Thursday, April 9, 2009

So what else is there to say?

I have listened to shocked, impassioned fans sharing their grief on the radio. I’ve read pages of emotional comments online. The sadness is understandable. A tragic death of a young man just as he reaches his life’s dream is horribly sad, regardless of the fact that he was a major league baseball player.

But what struck me today was the intensity of the loss that I felt for a man that I have never met. Why did I feel so personally affected by the tragedy of another woman’s son? It got me thinking about the experience of being a fan and how we all feel connected to the players of our adopted teams. 

These are our guys - these men who we may have met briefly as they stopped to sign an autograph. We don’t know them personally; these players on the practice fields in Arizona, these faces on the Jumbotron screen. Yet they are our boys. Our Angels. 

Our Nick Adenhart.

The beginning of baseball season is all about hope and promise. On Wednesday night, Nick Adenhart was the living, breathing embodiment of that hope. We cheered as he conquered his past setbacks and reached his potential right before our eyes. We were proud of him. We looked to the future. So when the news came of his senseless death the next morning, we all felt the loss. He was gone before we really had a chance to cheer for him.

When you root for a team, they become yours in a sense. You cheer for them in victory and you mourn for them in defeat. It may be vicarious, but that’s the fan experience. That’s why the death of Nick Adenhart feels like a personal loss. It makes us think of our own friends, our own brothers and sons, and how we would feel if they had been killed in the intersection in Fullerton.

The Adenhart family has suffered the greatest loss and they deserve their privacy and our prayers. But today’s outpouring of grief shows that the Angels fan community feels a personal loss as well.

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Here's some pictures taken with Tim Mead and those who attended our summer fanfest in 2009, as well as a couple of close ups of the Adenhart Collage we put together for Nick's mom and dad. Very proud moment of our website, giving back to the parents who lost their son. 

 

Adam Dodge, Brian Ilten, Chuck Richter & Eric Denton pose with Tim Mead with Nick Adenhart Photo Collage

Adam, Brian & Chuck present Tim Mead with Nick Adenhart Photo Collage

Adam, Brian & Chuck present Tim Mead with Nick Adenhart Photo Collage

Close up of Adenhart Photo Collage

Close up of Cherry Wood Framed Adenhart Collage Picture

AngelsWin.com Summer Fanfest 2009 - Adenhart Photo Collage Presentation

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It's bugged me since the end of the '09 season we haven't done more to create lasting memories of Nick. I'll never forget and I'm sure nobody else here will, but there needs to be something there for newer and younger fans. If there's anything at the stadium they've done a damn good job of hiding it (there's not anything, is there?). I'm sure it hasn't privately, but I feel we've let it slip from public memory far too easily.

 

I definitely agree. I would like to have left the 34 up on the wall, or retired his # and had it up with the rest of the retired numbers. It's still really tough for me to look back on that day. I still get teary-eyed. When I saw the picture of the Angels pouring champagne and beer on his jersey in celebration of reaching the playoffs that year, I got a lump in my throat. Although most of us didn't know him personally, we lost a member of our Angels family that day. R.I.P. Nick Adenhart. We miss you. 

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I remember the tribute pics to Tim Mead so vividly.

One of the coolest things I have seen and why this place is rad.

 

Seems so long ago, but yeah I agree. I thought it was pretty cool as well. 

 

Just wish I could have hand delivered them to the parents of Nick, or we present them both to both parents. 

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  • 3 years later...
On 4/9/2013 at 9:34 AM, Chuckster70 said:

Here's some pictures taken with Tim Mead and those who attended our summer fanfest in 2009, as well as a couple of close ups of the Adenhart Collage we put together for Nick's mom and dad. Very proud moment of our website, giving back to the parents who lost their son. 

 

 

Adam Dodge, Brian Ilten, Chuck Richter & Eric Denton pose with Tim Mead with Nick Adenhart Photo Collage

Adam, Brian & Chuck present Tim Mead with Nick Adenhart Photo Collage

Adam, Brian & Chuck present Tim Mead with Nick Adenhart Photo Collage

Close up of Adenhart Photo Collage

Close up of Cherry Wood Framed Adenhart Collage Picture

AngelsWin.com Summer Fanfest 2009 - Adenhart Photo Collage Presentation

Remembering #34 today.

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I was invited to go the game he pitched with a couple of my buddies. I was working at night at the time and couldn't go. I woke up to the news and was just shocked. 

Please don't drink and drive. Uber, Lyft ..there are so many options these days to get where you need to be after you've been drinking. It's not worth the dui or killing someone else, yourself, and damaging families forever. 

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We should also remember Lyman Bostock.  Another young player who was tragically murdered.

For those who are not familiar with his story,

http://articles.latimes.com/2008/apr/22/sports/sp-crowe22

http://www.espn.com/espn/eticket/story?page=bostock

Both players need to be remembered.

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I still have a commemorative program they gave out at the stadium in the days after his death. I've tried to look it up but can't find any information on it, and I can't remember if it was a one day thing or if they had them for weeks or months. Anyone else have one or remember when it was given out? 

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