AngelsWin.com

Administrators
  • Content Count

    261,994
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

AngelsWin.com last won the day on August 28 2014

AngelsWin.com had the most liked content!

About AngelsWin.com

  • Rank
    Administrator

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling

Recent Profile Visitors

9,292 profile views
  1. TEMPE, Ariz. — Normally mild-mannered, reserved and easy going, Mike Trout did not hold back when making his first public comments about the Houston Astros on Monday morning. “A lot of guys lost respect for some of those guys,” the Angels superstar said before the team’s first full-squad workout of the spring. Trout added that he considers himself friends with a few of the Astros players, and a couple of them had even reached out to him over the winter to give their side of the electronic sign-stealing situation. Trout did not express much sympathy for them. “It’s sad for baseball,” Trout said. “It’s tough. They cheated. I don’t agree with the punishments, the players not getting anything. It was a player driven thing. It sucks too because guys careers have been affected. A lot of people lost jobs. It was tough. Me going up the plate knowing what was coming? It would be fun up there.” Major League Baseball did not punish the players in the Astros cheating scandal, because commissioner Rob Manfred said he didn’t believe he could get honest answers from the players without offering them immunity. Manfred also said he considered stripping the Astros of their 2017 World Series title, but opted against it. Trout said he doesn’t view that championship in the same light now. “You don’t know what helped them or what not, but if you know what’s coming, it’s going to definitely help them,” Trout said. “I don’t know if you take the trophy away or take the rings away, but they should definitely do something. I don’t know what. To cheat like that, it’s sad to see.” During much of the 2017 season, the Astros were banging a trash can to alert hitters to the type of pitch. “I didn’t notice the banging,” he said. “I noticed the banging off the bat, from center field. It seemed like they weren’t missing pitches… I can’t tell you when this happened, but I’m sure it did. I can’t imagine what the pitchers feel like. It’s a mental game. You go in a stretch where you’re doing good and you go into Houston and got banged up, it could mentally drain you.” In the midst of the Astros sign-stealing news, Trout found himself at the center of a brief social media firestorm when there was an allegation that he had a Therapeutic Use Exemption to use Human Growth Hormone. Major League Baseball quickly issued a statement saying that no player had ever recieved a TUE for HGH. Trout, who said he was “in a tree stand” on a hunting trip when the story broke, made his first public comments, saying “it’s not true.” Trout also said he had received apologies from the source of the initial story — David Brosius, the son of former big leaguer Scott Brosius — and from Trevor Bauer, who had given more life to the story with his comments. More to come on this story. Related Articles Angels’ David Fletcher could see more time in outfield when Tommy La Stella is at second Angels pitcher Jaime Barría, 14 pounds lighter, trying to rediscover rookie form Angels’ Ty Buttrey believes he’s learned from 2019 rollercoaster season Dylan Bundy looks to take a step forward with Angels Angels’ Justin Anderson goes down with oblique injury View the full article
  2. By Robert Cunningham, Angelswin.com Senior Writer It is at this moment where we need to take a moment, stop to remind ourselves, and extend a tremendous thank you to Arte Moreno for authorizing the largest extension contract in the history of Major League Baseball to lock up perhaps the Greatest Of All Time (the G.O.A.T.!!!!), our very own center fielder, Mike Trout. Thank you Arte! Great job Eppler! Mike we love you! As fans we are living the dream by actually signing our best player to a career extension and preparing to enter a period of greater team relevancy in terms of the potential to go to the playoffs. Next season should be a marked improvement across the entire roster as Moreno and Eppler have upgraded at multiple positions. By the time late May/early June rolls around, Trout should be flanked in center field by Justin Upton and our emerging number one prospect, Jo Adell and the middle infield will likely consist of Simmons at SS and Fletcher at 2B. First base might be one or a combination of Walsh, Thaiss, Pujols, or a free agent or trade acquisition. Third base has been markedly improved for the next several years via the signing of the best 3B in baseball, Anthony Rendon. Designated hitter will certainly be some combination of Ohtani, Pujols, and other members of the team cycling through the spot on days off from playing in the field. Our rotation has marginally improved through the acquisition and signing of Dylan Bundy and Julio Teheran, respectively, adding to the existing rotation base of Ohtani and Heaney plus one or more of Barria, Canning, Sandoval, Andriese, and Suarez. The bullpen should have a host of familiar names like Buttrey, Robles, Middleton, Anderson, Ramirez, Bard, Cole, and Mayers, among others. The point is that not only will there be significant upgrades but team depth will have improved once again, allowing the team to absorb temporary and even long-term injuries without losing much overall effectiveness. Beyond that the Angels deserve some better luck in staying healthy in 2020 (i.e. team health BABIP will hopefully return to the mean). If you are one of the fans out there worried about starting pitching, all the Angels really have to do is tread water up until the Trade Deadline where Eppler can look for upgrades to improve the team at that time. By increasing our overall production and hopefully being healthy to start the year, the Angels will be better positioned to compete in an American League West that appears to be heading towards greater parity among the five teams in the Division. Houston will be a tough nut to crack but the Athletics also performed well and project to do so again in 2020. The Rangers have a new media deal and are flush with cash so there may be unexpected fireworks from Texas, too. Even the Mariners are starting to pick up steam towards contention. All of this is contributing to a much more level playing field, if not this year, by the 2021-2022 time frame. Greater parity likely means that less overall wins (think 90 wins or so) are needed to claim the A.L. West Division crown. No matter what, Angels fans should enjoy their ride on the Mike Trout express for the next few years because that freight train is leaving the station on its journey to the playoffs! As a parting thought, the table below summarizes the last three years of Mike Trout hitting baseballs: View the full article
  3. TEMPE, Ariz. — Ever since the Angels got Anthony Rendon to play third base, many fans and outsiders have assumed the way to squeeze David Fletcher and Tommy La Stella into the lineup together would be having La Stella move to first with Fletcher at second. On the eve of the Angels first full-squad workout, Manager Joe Maddon indicated Sunday there is a more likely scenario, with La Stella at second and Fletcher in right field. “Obviously you want to get Tommy out there as often as you can against righties,” Maddon said. “The challenge is that I like Fletcher on the field as much possible. The fact that David is versatile to play different positions is going to matter.” Maddon said Fletcher could “grab some games in the outfield too.” Fletcher has played 27 games in the outfield in the majors. Right fielder Brian Goodwin hits left-handed but he has reverse splits, with a career .842 OPS against lefties and .767 against righties. The Angels could start Fletcher in right and La Stella at second against righties, with Fletcher at second and Goodwin in right against lefties. Regardless of who starts, if the Angels are protecting a lead they’d likely finish with Fletcher at second and Goodwin in right. The other alternative — with La Stella at first when Albert Pujols is off or at DH — doesn’t seem to have much traction among Angels management. La Stella has played 5-1/3 innings there in his career. “We haven’t really discussed that right now,” Maddon said. “I’ve never seen Tommy play a whole lot of first base. I’m not saying it’s impossible. It’s just not a high priority yet, but it could be. It could be.” Even though La Stella isn’t as positionally flexible, Maddon seems committed to getting him in the lineup as much as possible after his breakthrough season in 2019. La Stella had an .832 OPS and 16 homers in half a season, earning an All-Star berth. He didn’t play in the All-Star Game, or much of the second half, because of a broken leg. Maddon had La Stella with the Chicago Cubs, using him mostly as a pinch-hitter, but he believes in the improvement La Stella made last year. “I don’t think we just saw last year as a fluke,” Maddon said. “I know how well this guy can hit. The power was something different, but I can see why it showed up. He’s done a lot of really good work. Again, he’s part of that mix. Nice problems to have when you get a little bit of depth.” TWO-WAY WALSH Jared Walsh reported to camp with the pitchers and catchers, but he still hasn’t thrown a bullpen session. Walsh said, as far as he knows, the Angels are still planning to use him as a two-way player. Related Articles Angels pitcher Jaime Barría, 14 pounds lighter, trying to rediscover rookie form Angels’ Ty Buttrey believes he’s learned from 2019 rollercoaster season Dylan Bundy looks to take a step forward with Angels Angels’ Justin Anderson goes down with oblique injury Alex Bregman, Jose Altuve apologize for Astros’ sign-stealing scheme The new rules, however, put some restrictions on him. Walsh can’t qualify as a two-way player until he’s pitched 20 innings and started 20 games as a position player, with at least three plate appearances in each game. The Angels will initially need to classify him as a position player on their roster. That means that he won’t be able to pitch unless the Angels are up or down by six runs, which means it will be tough for him to get the 20 innings. Walsh said he’s content to be a mop up pitcher for now. He’s mostly focused on improving at the plate. He had a .605 OPS in 87 plate appearances last year. There is playing time at first base up for grabs, with Walsh and Matt Thaiss as the leading candidates. “I think the best part of the big leagues last year was, when I struggled, I kind of got the blueprint of what I’m good at and what I’m not so good at,” he said. “So just in my offseason training, I wanted to kind of evolve as a baseball player like I do every year. Now I have concrete results of what worked for me and what didn’t.” View the full article
  4. Hello Orton,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  5. Hello tommyva,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  6. TEMPE, Ariz. — Jaime Barría’s 2018 season seems like so long ago. The Angels, who have spent all winter trying to upgrade their starting pitching, just two seasons ago had a 21-year-old post a 3.41 ERA over 26 starts. Barría is now trying to turn back the clock, after a winter spent shedding the pounds he gained since his big-league debut and trying to return to the pitch repertoire that made him successful. “I feel I have a fresh mind,” Barría said through an interpreter Saturday morning. “There are new people around here and they are giving me a chance. If I stay healthy and maintain my work ethic, I do believe I can stay up here in the majors.” Following the aforementioned breakthrough rookie season, Barría seemed destined to be a part of the rotation going into 2019. In fact, Barría said he’d been told that he would start the fifth game of the season. He’d made living arrangements in Southern California. Then, just days before opening day, the Angels swung a deal with the San Francisco Giants for Chris Stratton, who was out of options. The Angels believed there was more in the tank for Stratton – who had the high spin rate they gravitate toward – and they wanted to give him a shot. To create a spot for Stratton, the Angels sent down Barría. As it turns out, it was a crushing move. “It was very frustrating for me, thinking I had earned a spot,” he said. “I think the frustration carried over during the regular season.” When Barría did get the chance to pitch in the majors, he was doing so under an organizational philosophy to reduce the usage of his two-seam fastball. In 2018, Barría threw his two-seamer 23.3% of the time and his four-seamer 26.3%. Last year, the Angels cut his two-seamers down to 5.5%, essentially replacing those pitches with extra sliders. Barría’s slider is his best pitch. Now the Angels have a new manager, in Joe Maddon, and a new pitching coach, in Mickey Callaway. Barría said they told him he can throw the two-seamer again. Maddon, however, said it’s not as simple as throwing one type of fastball or the other. Often, two-seamers are better for arm-side hitters – right-handed batters against right-handed pitchers – and four-seamers for the opposite-side hitters. “If he throws less two-seamers to this side and more to this side, we really believe that’s going to make you better, so we’ve undergone that exercise with him,” Maddon said. Maddon added that many pitchers prefer two-seamers because of the sink and movement, but that doesn’t necessarily make it a better pitch. “I think because it’s straight sometimes pitchers underestimate the four-seam fastball,” Maddon said. “It looks straight, but they don’t understand that the hitter has a hard time catching up with that.” Besides the type of pitches he was throwing, Barría had also gained some weight, so he committed himself to getting in better shape over the winter. Barría focused on eating healthier, and he ran on the beach near his home in Panama at 5:30 in the morning each day. He has lost 14 pounds since last year. The result, he hopes, will be a bounceback season. “I was trying to get myself back to the Barría of 2017 and 2018,” he said. “That’s when I felt my best.” BUTTREY HURT Ty Buttrey will be slowed for a couple weeks with a slight strain of his left intercostal muscle, but he is still expected to be ready for Opening Day, according to Maddon. Buttrey said he felt something while reaching across his body when he was playing catch Thursday, and it was still bothering him Friday. The Angels sent him for an MRI, which showed the mild strain. Related Articles Angels’ Ty Buttrey believes he’s learned from 2019 rollercoaster season Dylan Bundy looks to take a step forward with Angels Angels’ Justin Anderson goes down with oblique injury Alex Bregman, Jose Altuve apologize for Astros’ sign-stealing scheme Shohei Ohtani is OK with Angels’ plan, but says he could have been ready sooner “The last thing I need to do, on Feb. 14, is to try play through it and make it worse,” Buttrey said Saturday. “We’re just trying to be more cautious. I feel great. They said the time for this to happen is right now… I’m not worried about it in the slightest.” ALSO Left-hander Luiz Gohara, who was once a top pitching prospect with the Atlanta Braves, is in camp with the Angels rehabbing a shoulder injury. Gohara said he has played catch four times and feels good. Gohara is months away from being able to pitch in games, though. “I know he’s got a big arm,” Maddon said. … Shohei Ohtani finally got his driver’s license over the winter. He said through his interpreter that he’s “enjoying” driving and he’s “pretty good.” He still hasn’t driven alone on the freeway. View the full article
  7. TEMPE, Ariz. — One of the lessons Ty Buttrey learned during his first full season in the Angels bullpen was that being a dependable big-leaguer is all about adjustments. The better players make them quickly. He didn’t. “Cody Allen told me last year, with these top pitchers, when something is going wrong, they can figure it out in one pitch or at least one game,” Buttrey said before a spring training workout this week. “They don’t let it go for two or three months, like I was.” Buttrey was one of the mysteries of the 2019 Angels. During the first three months, he was the team’s best reliever. Then, for a couple months, he was one of the worst. He finished strong in September, though, and took that into the winter. “Reflecting on it now, I think it was mostly mental,” Buttrey said. “I came up and had a lot of success for the first two-and-a-half, three months. And then I just kind of hit a roadblock in the middle. Then the next thing you know, you are doing something different mechanically and you don’t know how you got there.” Buttrey, who was used frequently when he was pitching well, insists fatigue wasn’t the issue. “It was just lack of experience,” he said. “It was a growing period for me.” Buttrey, who turned 26 at the start of the season, posted a 2.20 ERA through July 5, with 49 strikeouts and 12 walks in 41 innings. Former Manager Brad Ausmus used Buttrey often in the sixth or seventh innings or even earlier, whenever he felt the game was in the balance. However, things began to go wrong for Buttrey in July. For the next two months, he had a 7.66 ERA over 23 games. Part of the issue, Buttrey believes, is he was tipping his pitches. He said the way he held his hands – and even the way he was breathing – would give the hitters an idea what pitch was coming. Buttrey got those issues under control down the stretch, when he gave up three runs in his final nine innings, including scoreless appearances in eight of nine games. During that time, Buttrey also began throwing his changeup slightly more often than he had in the first four months of the season. It had been a pitch that was sporadically effective throughout his minor-league career. Buttrey said an adjustment with his grip on the pitch suddenly made it more useful. He has spent the winter continuing to refine it. “I’m getting that hard splitting action, like I used to in the past,” Buttrey said, “so I’m very excited to use it this year.” CANNING GOOD TO GO Griffin Canning, who missed the end of last season with an elbow issue, said he has been throwing since November and he is 100%. “I think (the elbow issue) was just something they need to monitor,” Canning said Friday. “I need to watch my throwing program. Even when I’m feeling good, I need to tone it down a little bit.” Related Articles Dylan Bundy looks to take a step forward with Angels Angels’ Justin Anderson goes down with oblique injury Alex Bregman, Jose Altuve apologize for Astros’ sign-stealing scheme Shohei Ohtani is OK with Angels’ plan, but says he could have been ready sooner Angels’ Andrew Heaney unloads on Astros in wake of sign-stealing reports Canning goes into camp as the leading candidate to take the fourth spot in the rotation to open the season, behind Andrew Heaney, Dylan Bundy and Julio Teheran. ALSO Left-handed reliever José Quijada joined the team Friday after missing the first couple days of workouts. Quijada had been been at home in Venezuela when the Angels claimed him on waivers from the Miami Marlins on Monday… Patrick Sandoval returned to the ballpark Friday after being out a few days with the flu. View the full article
  8. Hello Joanna Keeper,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  9. TEMPE, Ariz. — Ask Joe Maddon why he is optimistic Dylan Bundy can be better with the Angels than he was with the Baltimore Orioles, and the Angels manager refers to what he knows from his nine years managing the Tampa Bay Rays. Maddon suggested getting out of the American League East is worth knocking a whole run off a pitcher’s ERA. “It’s a different animal there,” Maddon said Thursday. “Pitching in Baltimore, that ballpark is very hitter friendly. Yankee Stadium is very hitter friendly. Boston is very hitter friendly, and Toronto is the most hitter friendly. Maybe Tampa Bay is legit. He’s been pitching in spots that are really difficult. I’m curious to get him more at sea level out there, playing games in our ballpark. Let’s just see how it plays out, because I like his stuff.” Bundy brings a career 4.79 ERA to the Angels. That includes a 4.49 ERA in Baltimore, 7.91 at Yankee Stadium, 4.34 at Fenway Park and a surprising 3.89 in Toronto. In Anaheim, he has a 7.64 ERA in 17 2/3 innings, obviously pitching against the Angels. “That lineup I’ve had to face a few times, and you add (Anthony) Rendon to it, it’s a tough one,” Bundy said. “I’d rather be in front of them. Behind them, I guess. I was in front of them and it wasn’t good.” Opponents and ballparks aside, Bundy has a chance to be better because of a mechanical tweak he made toward the end of last season. “I started going over my head around the All-Star break, somewhere around there, and it got the tempo better,” Bundy said. “It made my pitches more consistent on a day in, day out basis, I think.” While Bundy may have felt better, the numbers weren’t. He had a 4.65 ERA in the first half and a 4.97 ERA in the second half. Statcast metrics that measure the quality of contact he allowed also weren’t changed much. Bundy also reduced his percentage of four-seam fastballs, in favor of more two-seamers, late last season. But he said that’s not necessarily a trend he plans to continue. “I think in the second half I started throwing a couple more two-seamers, but I wouldn’t say I did it on purpose,” he said. “The hitters weren’t hitting certain pitches, so I started to throw it more. The biggest factor is if the hitters are hitting it, don’t throw it. Throw something else. The hitters always let you know if it’s working or not.” The Angels certainly hope the right adjustments are still out there for Bundy, who is still just 27. The fourth overall pick in the 2011 draft, Bundy reached the majors a couple months before his 20th birthday in 2012. Since then, he’s mostly been soaking up innings and learning for Orioles teams that weren’t very good. Related Articles Angels’ Justin Anderson goes down with oblique injury Alex Bregman, Jose Altuve apologize for Astros’ sign-stealing scheme Shohei Ohtani is OK with Angels’ plan, but says he could have been ready sooner Angels’ Andrew Heaney unloads on Astros in wake of sign-stealing reports Angels GM Billy Eppler, after failed Dodgers deal, says ‘nothing active right now’ What he’s done best lately is stay on the mound. Bundy has averaged 30 starts and 168 innings over the past three years. Injuries have shredded the Angels pitching staff for the past few years, with only two pitchers in the past three seasons reaching 30 starts. Andrew Heaney did it in 2018 and Ricky Nolasco in 2017. Bundy said he’s learned how to manage himself physically to get through a season. And he continues to tweak it, with a more rigorous throwing program this winter that he hopes will help him get off to a quick start. “We’ll see,” he said. “I feel great so far.” View the full article
  10. TEMPE, Ariz. — Justin Anderson spent all winter working on strengthening one part of his core, only to have another fail him before spring training had really begun. After a trapezius injury cost him the end of the 2019 season, Anderson suffered a grade 2 sprain of his left oblique that will land him on the injured list to start the season, Angels manager Joe Maddon said Thursday. Anderson, 27, felt the injury Tuesday, the day before the Angels’ first full squad workout. “It was just a casual day of playing catch,” the right-hander said. “I had two throws left in my throwing program and the next thing I know, someone stabbed me in the side, it felt like.” Anderson’s disappointing start to the spring followed a winter in which he’d worked with a doctor and two strength coaches because of last year’s trapezius injury. “I felt stronger than ever,” Anderson said. “I felt strong, ready to go, and then this happened. It sucks.” PROSPECT UNDERGOES TOMMY JOHN SURGERY José Soriano, who was named the No. 7 prospect in the Angels system by Baseball America, reportedly underwent Tommy John surgery, which will cost him most of the next two seasons. Soriano, 21, spent last season at Class-A Burlington, posting a 2.55 ERA in 77-2/3 innings. He struck out 84, but walked 48. Soriano has a 2.76 ERA in his minor-league career. Soriano’s injury not only extends the time frame for eventually reaching the majors, but also deprives the organization of a talented prospect they may have been able to use in a trade. ALSO Maddon said he hasn’t settled on how he’d like the middle of his lineup to look with Mike Trout, Anthony Rendon and Shohei Ohtani. He said he’s most likely to keep Trout in the No. 2 spot, but he could have Ohtani and Rendon hit in either order in the Nos. 3-4 spots. … Related Articles Alex Bregman, Jose Altuve apologize for Astros’ sign-stealing scheme Shohei Ohtani is OK with Angels’ plan, but says he could have been ready sooner Angels’ Andrew Heaney unloads on Astros in wake of sign-stealing reports Angels GM Billy Eppler, after failed Dodgers deal, says ‘nothing active right now’ Angels’ Shohei Ohtani expected to start pitching in May Jason Castro, who missed the first workout because of the flu, participated Thursday. Patrick Sandoval is still out sick. … Although the first official full squad workout isn’t until Monday, Justin Upton was among the position players who got in some work Thursday. Upton did a series of outfield drills. … Last spring Angels pitchers threw all their bullpen sessions in spring training with Rapsodo devices recording data like velocity and spin rate, but they were notably absent in the first two days this spring. “Those are tools that can be utilized when it’s appropriate,” Maddon said. “I don’t think it’s necessary to shove it every time.” Maddon said pitching coach Mickey Callaway will determine when to use them. View the full article
  11. WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Houston Astros players Alex Bregman and José Altuve said Thursday the team is sorry for its sign-stealing scheme that was investigated and punished by Major League Baseball. “I am really sorry,” Bregman said. Astros owner Jim Crane and new manager Dusty Baker – who replaced the fired AJ Hinch – also spoke at a news conference at the team’s spring training facility. “We cannot take back what happened,” Crane said. MLB did not punish any players for the cheating and Crane said he stood by that. We’re not going to do anything to the players,” the owner said. Altuve said there was a full team meeting Wednesday to discuss what happened. MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred disciplined the Astros after he found the team broke rules by using electronics to steal signs during its run to the 2017 World Series championship and again in the 2018 season. The Astros were fined $5 million, the maximum allowed under major league rules, and forfeited their next two first- and second-round amateur draft picks. The investigation found that the Astros used the video feed from a center field camera to view and decode opposing catcher’s signs. Players banged on a trash can to signal to batters what was coming, believing it would improve chances of getting a hit. View the full article
  12. TEMPE, Ariz. — A day after the Angels revealed their plan to give Shohei Ohtani a late start as a pitcher, Ohtani said it was not a concession he needed. “I was getting prepared to start on Opening Day, but if that is what the team wants me to do, then I’ll be prepared to delay my debut,” Ohtani said through his interpreter after the first official workout of the spring on Wednesday. “I don’t see any problems.” Ohtani finished his rehab from Tommy John surgery in December, three months later than scheduled because of knee surgery. The Angels decided to give him more rest, and also preserve his innings for later in the season, so they are opting to have him wait until mid-May to begin pitching in major league games. Ohtani said he “probably could’ve made it (by Opening Day), but they told me a while ago that I’d be waiting until mid-May, so that’s where my mindset is right now.” Also on Wednesday, Major League Baseball officially released its 2020 rule changes, including the two-way player designation that essentially applies only to Ohtani. Because Ohtani qualifies as a two-way player, he does not count against the limit of 13 pitchers that a team can carry on its 26-man roster. INJURY UPDATES Félix Peña, who had knee surgery last August, said he is not sure if he will be ready for Opening Day. “I don’t have a date yet,” he said through an interpreter. “I’m not too certain, but I’m working hard for (Opening Day).” Peña has been throwing off a mound. He said he’s cleared for all baseball activity, and he will even start fielding practice soon. Max Stassi said he is hoping that he’ll be back from his hip surgery in time for the opener, although he’s still slightly behind the other catchers in camp. “I anticipate myself being ready for opening day,” he said. “I feel better than ever, honestly, with the rehab that I’ve done and the surgery that I’ve had.” Related Articles Angels’ Andrew Heaney unloads on Astros in wake of sign-stealing reports Angels GM Billy Eppler, after failed Dodgers deal, says ‘nothing active right now’ Angels’ Shohei Ohtani expected to start pitching in May Report: Angels owner Arte Moreno pulled plug on proposed trade with Dodgers Angels 2020 spring training preview: Did they get enough pitching over the winter? ALSO Patrick Sandoval and Jason Castro missed the first workout because of the flu. A few other players have also been sick, to a lesser degree, Manager Joe Maddon said. … Fox Sports West will again broadcast almost all of the Angels’ spring training games. The only games they won’t show are on split-squad days, when they will air just one of the games. Terry Smith and José Mota will again handle the play-by-play. View the full article
  13. TEMPE, Ariz. >> Andrew Heaney, who will always be among the league leaders in honesty, unleashed a torrent of emotions on the Houston Astros on Wednesday morning. The revelations from the past winter about electronic sign stealing used by the Astros didn’t sit well with the Angels’ left-hander. “I am not going to make excuses for those guys,” Heaney said before the Angels first official workout of the spring. “I know how it is. You get caught up in something. I’m sure they look back now and say ‘Oh (expletive) ,we really took that overboard.’ “But I think that somebody in that locker room had to have enough insight to say ‘This is not OK.’… Somebody in that locker room had to say, ‘This is (messed) up. We shouldn’t be doing this.’ For nobody to stand up and nobody to say, ‘We’re cheating other players,’ that sucks. That’s a (expletive) feeling for everybody. I hope they feel like (expletive).” Heaney, in fact, needed only to look to the other side of the room to find one of them. Max Stassi, who was acquired by the Angels last July, had been up and down with the Astros since 2013. The catcher was back in the majors from mid-August 2017 to the end of the season, during which the Astros were reportedly at the peak of their sign-stealing. Stassi said he was too inexperienced in his big league career to do anything to stop the practice. “I saw what was going on,” he said. “When you’re a lower man on the totem pole, you just show up and you go out there and play. I apologize to all those around the game, the people who were affected by it, the fans, coaches. Especially the kids who look up to us. We’re supposed to set an example and do the right thing. We didn’t do that.” Stassi added: “It was wrong. I feel terrible. I think that looking back, that every single person that was part of that team, or in that clubhouse, regrets what was going on. If we could all go back, I’m sure they’d never even thought of the idea.” Stassi was up for the entire 2018 season and the first four months of 2019, before he was traded. He said he “didn’t see anything going on past 2017.” Heaney isn’t so sure. “I still don’t think we really know everything that happened,” Heaney said. “I don’t think necessarily everybody wants us to know everything that was going on. That’s the tough part.” Heaney didn’t even pitch in Houston in 2017, because he missed most of the season rehabbing from Tommy John surgery. He has only pitched three times in Houston since then, with a 5.14 ERA. That’s too small of a sample to infer much. His overall ERA in the past two seasons is 4.41. Heaney said it was a “poorly kept secret” that the Astros had been stealing signs. There were times that he was suspicious, but it was more when there were runners on second base. “I would go back and look at video and say ‘Am I doing something in my glove? Am I showing anything?’” Heaney said. “I can’t say if they are banging on an (expletive) trash can or not. I don’t know. I am not paying attention to that. I am not going to sit here and say I feel victimized. I’m not going to make that excuse. I think it’s part of your job to cover that up, and be on top of it. But it’s not your responsibility to make sure teams aren’t stealing your (expletive) illegally.” Related Articles Angels GM Billy Eppler, after failed Dodgers deal, says ‘nothing active right now’ Angels’ Shohei Ohtani expected to start pitching in May Report: Angels owner Arte Moreno pulled plug on proposed trade with Dodgers Angels 2020 spring training preview: Did they get enough pitching over the winter? Angels 2020 spring training preview: Who’s here? Who’s gone? The Angels are now set to open the 2020 season in Houston, giving them the first opportunity to take on the team that seems be universally reviled in baseball. Asked if he thinks baseball, and specifically the Astros, will be free of such sign-stealing now, Heaney shrugged. “I think they still have a lot of work to do,” he said. “Personally, I think they’re trying to, but we’ll see what’s going on with the video and in-game stuff and see how that gets sorted out. Because I think that’s something that needs to be addressed.” View the full article
  14. Hello LPJ,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  15. Hello AngelfanSince75,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png