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  1. APRIL 3, 2002 GAME 3 - INDIANS AT ANGELS ANAHEIM -- Cleveland Indians starter Chuck Finley was unable to make his scheduled start against the Angels Wednesday night so he could tend to family matters after his wife, actress Tawny Kitaen, was arrested on charges of spousal abuse and battery. Finley has 189 career wins, while his replacement Ryan Drese went into the game with one. But what looked like a break for the Angels instead worked in the Indians' favor, as Drese out-pitched Angels starter Aaron Sele in a 6-5 Indians victory before 18,194 at Edison Field. The Angels made things interesting by scoring two runs in the bottom of the ninth. But with the potential tying run on second base, Indians closer Bob Wickman struck out Troy Glaus to end it. Sele's debut with the Angels wasn't unlike the starts of Jarrod Washburn and Kevin Appier in the first two games of the season. Like Washburn and Appier, Sele lasted only five innings and made a lot of pitches -- 99. He wasn't terrible, but he wasn't good either. The Indians got eight hits off him, scored four runs and had at least one baserunner in every inning he pitched. Sele also had trouble getting the big out, as the Indians scored three of their four runs against him with two out. ''It was just one of those days,'' said Sele (0-1), who began last season with eight consecutive wins for the Mariners. ''I got the ball up and was battling it the whole game. You get the ball up to good hitters, they'll put the ball in play and that's what they did.'' Sele walked three, struck out two and fell to 5-8 against the Indians in his career. ''Right now it looks like our starters are having trouble getting their feet on the ground and pitching deep into games,'' Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. ''We know that'll flip-flop.'' Meanwhile, Drese escaped a first-inning jam having allowed only one run, then settled into a groove and lasted 5 2/3 innings. It was only his fifth career major league start, but he gave up just three runs and earned his second career major league victory. ''We knew he had a very good arm,'' Scioscia said. ''It was a gutty performance. In the first inning we had him on the ropes.'' In the first inning the Angels loaded the bases with nobody out on a single by Eckstein and walks to Darin Erstad and Tim Salmon. Garret Anderson popped to short for the first out. Glaus then lined a single to right field, but because the ball was hit so hard the runners advanced only one base, with Eckstein scoring. Brad Fullmer followed with a hard-hit one-hopper to second baseman Ricky Gutierrez, who began a 4-6-3 inning-ending double play. The Indians offense finished with 11 hits, including two each by Matt Lawton, Omar Vizquel, Brady Anderson and Gutierrez. The Angels also had 11 hits, two each by David Eckstein, Glaus and Bengie Molina. The Indians went ahead for good in the second inning getting four hits off Sele. Russell Branyan drove in one with a single and Lawton drove home two more with a two-out double for a 3-1 lead. Down 6-3 in the ninth, the Angels put together a rally against Wickman, starting with Adam Kennedy's leadoff double. He went to third on Eckstein's groundout, and after Erstad walked, Salmon singled to drive in Kennedy, moving Erstad to third. Anderson followed and swung at the first pitch, grounding out to second to score Erstad and move pinch runner Jeff DaVanon to second. But on a 3-2 count, Wickman struck out Glaus with a splitter, allowing the Indians to take two of three in the series. NOTEBOOK ANAHEIM -- Indians pitcher Chuck Finley, scheduled to start Wednesday's game against the Angels, was scratched from the lineup ''to take care of his family,'' according to Indians general manager Mark Shapiro. Finley's wife, actress Tawny Kitaen, was charged Wednesday with spousal abuse and battery for allegedly attacking him while the two drove home to Newport Beach from dinner on Monday night. ''She kicked him in the thigh, in the leg, in the arm, she grabbed his ear and twisted it,'' said Tori Richards, spokeswoman for the Orange County district attorney's office. ''At one point, her high-heel shoe was on top of his foot pressing the accelerator to the ground.'' According to Richards, after the couple arrived home a third party called 911. Police arrested Kitaen after they noticed abrasions and scrapes on Finley. Kitaen, who since marrying Finley in 1997 has gone by her given name of Julie, was released from Orange County Jail on Wednesday. If convicted of the two misdemeanor counts, Kitaen, 40, faces up to a year in jail and a $6,000 fine. A judge also issued a restraining order against Kitaen, ordering her to have no contact with Finley. Kitaen will continue to live in the couple's Newport Beach home. Finley, who signed with the Indians in 2000 after 14 seasons with the Angels, lives in the Ritz Carlton in downtown Cleveland when the team is home. Following Monday night's incident, Finley attended Tuesday's game at Edison Field. Indians manager Charlie Manuel said Finley ''seemed fine.'' But Finley called Shapiro Wednesday afternoon and said he couldn't pitch in the game. It would have been Finley's first start of the season. ''He did not feel like he'd make it to the ballpark,'' Shapiro said. ''And if he did he wouldn't be able to pitch. He's just trying to take care of his kids and family right now. ''My attitude is, he's the same as any player in our organization. Everyone has issues outside of being a major league player that you have to deal with in life. What he's going through is the regular ups and downs people go through in their personal lives. But it's tough to go through it when you're in an environment like this.'' Shapiro said he expects Finley to rejoin the team this weekend in Detroit. * Closer Troy Percival underwent an MRI and bone scan Wednesday because of lingering discomfort in his mid-section. Percival was diagnosed with a strained right intercostal muscle and will be out at least until Monday, when he'll be reevaluated. Before the results of the tests were known, Percival, who earned a save Tuesday night, wasn't concerned: ''It's no big story, it's something that's been bothering me for about three weeks. It's more for peace of mind.'' Percival said he first felt the discomfort pitching against Colorado in a spring training game in mid-March, but he ''tried to pitch through it.'' Percival's velocity on Tuesday was down to the 92-94 mph range, below his normal 95-98 mph. ''I haven't been able to jump on a pitch 100 percent,'' he said. ''It's been more like 90 percent.'' * Left-handed reliever Dennis Cook (bruised ribs) will throw in the season opener for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga today. If all goes well, Cook could be activated from the disabled list on Saturday. … ... The Angels are off Thursday and will begin a three-game series in Texas starting Friday. The Associated Press contributed to this story. View the full article
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  3. APRIL 2, 2002 GAME 2 - INDIANS AT ANGELS By Joe Haakenson, AngelsWin.com Contributor ANAHEIM -- Kevin Appier's first start as an Angel won't be one to tell the grandkids about years from now, but the end result was one the Angels will gladly accept. Appier, who came to the Angels from the Mets in a trade for Mo Vaughn Dec. 27, bobbed and weaved his way through five innings in the Angels' 7-5 victory over the Cleveland Indians Tuesday night before 20,055 at Edison Field. Appier gave up four runs (two earned) and four hits while making 106 pitches, which helped to cut short his first night in Angel red. The win, though, was more a result of the bullpen and the offense, which scored five runs with two outs. Ben Weber (two scoreless innings), Al Levine (one scoreless inning) and Troy Percival (first save) combined to throw four innings in relief of Appier, allowing one run and two hits. Russell Branyan homered off Percival in the ninth for the only run. The Angels got most of their offense from the top of the lineup, where David Eckstein and Darin Erstad combined for five hits, two stolen bases, four runs and three RBIs. Eckstein had three hits, scored three runs, stole a base and made an outstanding defensive play. Even Troy Glaus went to the opposite field, hitting a two-run double to right-center field in the seventh inning, providing the margin for victory. The Angels stole three bases and ran the bases aggressively all night. It was the type of offense Angels manager Mike Scioscia stressed during spring training. ''That's my style,'' Erstad said. ''Grind it out, scratch and claw, do the little things to win. A lot of guys did that today. We're going to win a lot of ballgames if we keep doing it.'' The game-winning run, though, came courtesy of Indians second baseman Ricky Gutierrez, who is taking over for Roberto Alomar (traded to the Mets). With two out in the sixth inning and the game tied at 4, Gutierrez dropped Bengie Molina's routine pop fly, allowing Glaus to score from third and give the Angels the lead for good. After being shut out by Bartolo Colon in their opener, the Angels got on the scoreboard in the first inning against Indians starter C.C. Sabathia. With one out, Erstad singled and stole second. Tim Salmon followed with an RBI double and 1-0 Angels lead. Appier made a lot of pitches in the first two innings (41) but didn't allow any runs or hits. In the third, though, Omar Vizquel had an RBI triple and Ellis Burks had an RBI single to give Cleveland a 2-1 lead, as Appier's pitch count continued to rise. He made 71 pitches through three innings, 83 through four. ''I didn't think I threw all that badly,'' Appier said. ''They made things really tough, working counts and taking pitches. Really, they were super disciplined at the plate.'' In the fifth, though, the defense betrayed Appier. With one out and no one on base, Matt Lawton hit a hard grounder to Eckstein at shortstop. Eckstein knocked the ball down, picked it up and threw in time to get Lawton. But Lawton was ruled safe because first baseman Benji Gil pulled his foot off the bag. Gil was charged with an error. It was a costly error, because the Indians went on to score two unearned runs in the inning. Burks drove in the first with an RBI single on a hit-and-run play, and Jim Thome drove in the second with a sacrifice fly. ''His pitch count was extremely high for the fifth inning, but Ape battled and made good pitches,'' Scioscia said. ''We didn't help him much with the error, but Ape kept us in the game.'' The Angels got the runs back in the bottom of the fifth by putting together a rally after two were out and no one was on base. Adam Kennedy drew a walk and stole second, and Eckstein followed with an RBI single to right field, cutting their deficit to 4-3. Erstad then ripped a double into the right-field corner, scoring Eckstein from first to tie the game at 4. ''Everybody wants to do it, and we definitely have to do it,'' Eckstein said of manufacturing runs. ''When you have a team that wants to do it, it makes you better. If you move runners over it makes it easier for the next guy.'' The Angels went ahead for good in the sixth scoring the unearned run on Gutierrez's error. The only hit of the inning was Brad Fullmer's first as an Angel. With Glaus (walk) on first and two outs, Fullmer singled to right, sending Glaus to third. Molina followed with the popup that was dropped. NOTEBOOK ANAHEIM -- The Angels decided during the offseason that they'd be better off spending money on offense, so they let reliable reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa leave. That opened the door for a variety of the organization's younger pitchers to try to win a job in the bullpen. Bart Miadich, Brendan Donnelly and Matt Wise were among those in the mix, but ultimately it was veteran Donne Wall who won the job during spring training. Wall pitched two perfect innings in his Angel debut on Sunday night, a good start in his effort to bounce back from a bad season in 2001 with the Mets. Wall was 0-4 with a 4.85 ERA in 32 appearances last year while battling through shoulder problems. ''I was very frustrated,'' Wall said. ''I tried to stay as positive as I could, but physically, my body wasn't doing what it was used to.'' Wall, 34, is healthy again, and the Angels are hoping that he returns to the form he showed from 1998-2000 with the Padres, when he served as closer Trevor Hoffman's set-up man. In those three seasons Wall went 17-10 with a 2.92 ERA. ''Our job in the bullpen is to get the ball to (closer) Troy (Percival) with the lead,'' he said. ''It doesn't matter if you come in in the third inning or the eighth, just get the ball to Troy.'' * Left-handed reliever Dennis Cook made 31 pitches during a simulated game Monday at Rancho Cucamonga, the Angels' Single-A affiliate. Cook, on the disabled list with bruised ribs, will throw again in the Quakes' season-opener on Thursday. If all goes well, Cook could be activated by Saturday in Texas. ''Oh yeah, I've been antsy,'' Cook said. ''I think I'm close.'' Cook, 39, was injured during the Angels' March 9 fight with the San Diego Padres. Starter Ramon Ortiz, in staying on a five-day pitching schedule, threw 90 pitches in a simulated game Monday at Rancho Cucamonga. He'll make his first start of the season Saturday in Texas. * Manager Mike Scioscia said the Angels' opening day dud should be something from which the players can learn. ''Opening day is probably as close as you're going to get to a playoff atmosphere,'' he said. ''You'd like the guys to use the experience to get used to it. Opening day is part of the season and the fanfare is part of the package. You want to use that energy for something positive because there might be a time during the season or in the playoffs when you'll be in the same situation.'' View the full article
  4. While waiting to see if and when the coronavirus shutdown will end and the MLB season will begin, we took some Angels questions via Twitter on Wednesday. If no season is to be played does (Anthony) Rendon have just six years left on the contract? Or seven still? I’m assuming six since Betts will be free agent this offseason. Sucks to be Dodgers if that happens. — @mattyball71 Anthony Rendon’s contract covers the 2020 to 2026 seasons, specifically, so if there is no 2020 season, the Angels simply lose a year of Rendon’s contract. Of course, they also won’t have to pay him his full salary in 2020, so they get some relief in that way. How many games do you think would be too little to even consider playing the season at all? — @TinaTigerl18 You would think that you would need at least 100 games or so for the season to be considered legitimate, but I wouldn’t be surprised if they play as few as 75. Most of the money from TV comes from the playoffs, so MLB is going to do whatever it can to still have the playoffs, even if they follow a significantly shortened season. Being optimistic that there will be baseball by Summer. How are (Shohei) Ohtani and (Griffin) Canning? — @dweinberger66 As of last week, Shohei Ohtani was throwing and still on track to be ready to pitch whenever the season begins. Griffin Canning was cleared this week to resume throwing, about four weeks after undergoing a platelet-rich plasma injection in his elbow. He could be on the mound by the end of April, and could be ready by the time the season starts. Which pitcher, not named Shohei, do you think will be a boost to our rotation and/or bullpen? — @Br3nd0714 I think the biggest potential improvement to the pitching staff might have come from Keynan Middleton. Middleton lost some velocity on his fastball when he came back from Tommy John surgery late in 2019, but in spring training he was again throwing 96-97 mph. He’s been very good when he’s been healthy, and he potentially gives the Angels three closer-caliber relievers, along with Hansel Robles and Ty Buttrey. A dominating bullpen can cover up a lot of issues with the rotation. Do you think there’s any possibility the Angels get rid of either Simba (Andrelton Simmons), (David) Fletcher, or (Tommy) La Stella for a pitcher above Junior Varsity level? — @RockyFalboa Andrelton Simmons and La Stella are both set to be free agents at the end of the 2020 season, so their value would be limited in terms of acquiring a front-line pitcher, even if there would have been a full season. Fletcher, on the other hand, could definitely be an attractive piece to help the Angels get a pitcher, if they were inclined to move him. With a possible lost season can AP (Albert Pujols) still get to 700 (home runs)? — @DeliriousDrew84 If there are no games in 2020, it will be just about impossible for Albert Pujols to reach 700 homers. He is currently at 656, so he needs another 44 homers. He isn’t hitting 44 homers in a single season at age 41 in 2021. Even if they play half a season in 2020, it will be tough (to reach 700), based on his age and the trajectory of his performance. Pujols was healthy the entire 2019 season, and he hit 23 homers. When the season starts, will the date correspond with the previous schedule? Or will we start from scratch against Houston? — @GeorgeKittle11 The schedule is a very complicated web, so restarting it would be virtually impossible. When the season started late in 1995, after the strike ended, they simply picked up the schedule where it was in late April. Wherever they pick it up, they’ll need to tweak it to make sure teams have the same number of games, and the same number of home and road games, but I suspect they would simply add games to existing series were they are off days now. How does a shortened, or even canceled, season affect (GM) Billy Eppler’s job? Would he have a better chance of getting an extension or a worse chance? — @FletchSZNN Only team owner Arte Moreno truly knows the answer to that one. If Moreno had decided before the season even began that this was going to be Eppler’s last year as general manager, then perhaps he could still make a change at the end of the season, regardless of what happens. However, if Moreno was truly waiting to judge Eppler based on what happened in 2020, then it would seem like he would at least give him a one-year extension if there is no 2020 season. Do you think MLB will change the playoff format now that all other leagues have at least 14 teams in the playoffs now and MLB is still at 10? — @WillieJ2323 The idea floated during spring training – six teams playing best-of-three series and one getting a first-round bye in each league – was probably going to happen, perhaps as soon as 2021, from my understanding. The TV partners like it, and the players like it, so that’s reason enough for it to happen. As for what happens in 2020, it’s anyone’s guess. It seems likely that they will do something besides the standard playoff system, just because extra playoff games would help make up some of the lost revenue from the shortened season. What’s your best lineup for this team? — @EricSpitz As a matter of fact, Strat-O-Matic has been running a simulation of the season using its computer game and I’ve been supplying the Angels lineup. I tweak it a little each day, but normally I’ve been using something like this: David Fletcher 2B, Mike Trout CF, Anthony Rendon 3B, Shohei Ohtani DH, Justin Upton LF, Albert Pujols 1B, Brian Goodwin RF, Andrelton Simmons SS, Jason Castro C. The hard part is balancing the playing time between Fletcher and Tommy La Stella. Manager Joe Maddon said in spring training that La Stella would play second against right-handers, so that means Fletcher was probably going to play right field, or else fill in for a Simmons, Rendon or Upton on the other days. How do you think the Angels organization is going to adjust using Shohei Ohtani in a shortened season or are they going to stay with the once every seven days model? — @darylbresach I don’t think the length of the season affects the Angels’ desire to have Ohtani pitch once a week. They are very cautious about the intensity of his workload, so they want him to have the day off before and after he pitches. If he pitches too often, that puts stress on his arm and takes him out of the lineup as a hitter too much. They believe that pitching once a week, and hitting as many as four days a week, is how they maximize his value at both. One potential change, however, is that the Angels had planned on using Ohtani to pitch before or after a scheduled off day as much as possible, so he could get the day off without missing a day in the lineup. Many of those days off may become game days in a truncated schedule. Related Articles Former Angel Jim Edmonds tested positive for coronavirus, but is now symptom free Angels’ Griffin Canning cleared to resume throwing Angels’ Andrew Heaney bides his time during coronavirus quarantine Former Angels star Jim Edmonds goes to hospital for coronavirus testing Angels minor leaguer uses coronavirus shutdown to build college recruiting site Do Arte (Moreno) and Billy (Eppler) really believe they can be contenders without an ace or a closer? Sorry, Heaney is not an ace and closers by committee don’t work. Another wasted Trout year. — @nohohomi First, Robles’ performance last year certainly warrants him getting credit for being a closer. As for the ace, the Angels tried to sign Gerrit Cole, Stephen Strasburg and Zack Wheeler and they tried to trade for Corey Kluber. They struck out on all of them. Instead, they tried to build a team around the offense and the bullpen, similar to what the Milwaukee Brewers have done each of the past few years. It’s not the ideal way to go about it, but it was the best option they had once they missed out on the front-line starters. What are some of the road trips that you look forward to covering when the schedule comes out each year? — @NCAngelsfan I always enjoy going to New York, because it’s unlike any other city. The crowds everywhere would drive me crazy if I lived there, but it’s a fun city for three or four days. I also love Seattle, and I’m fortunate enough to get three trips a year there (normally). I think Minneapolis is also highly underrated. The ballpark and the city are beautiful, as long as you don’t go in April and get snow. What’s your favorite food to grub on at Angel Stadium? — @badberny Cathy’s Cookies are pretty great. We started a tradition late last season in which a different writer would buy a bucket of the chocolate chip cookies each Saturday home game, and they would be shared throughout the press box. View the full article
  5. Jim Edmonds reported on Wednesday night on his Instagram account that he tested positive for the coronavirus, but he said that he’s now symptom free. Edmonds, who began his major league career with the Angels, posted a video in which he explained what happened to him after he was hospitalized over the weekend. “Just wanted to drop a quick note,” Edmonds said. “I appreciate everyone who has sent well wishes and wished me the best. I did test positive for pneumonia and test positive for the virus. I am completely symptom free now and doing really well, so I must have had it for a while before I got tested.” Edmonds, 49, posted on social media on Saturday that he’d undergone tests, but he didn’t report the results until Wednesday.Related Articles Angels’ Griffin Canning cleared to resume throwing Angels’ Andrew Heaney bides his time during coronavirus quarantine Former Angels star Jim Edmonds goes to hospital for coronavirus testing Angels minor leaguer uses coronavirus shutdown to build college recruiting site Reports: MLB, players union reach tentative deal to salvage 2020 season Edmonds urged people to see a doctor if they have shortness of breath. “Don’t take it lightly,” he said. “Take care of yourself.” A Gold Glove outfielder, Edmonds spent parts of his first seven big league seasons with the Angels. He was then traded to the St. Louis Cardinals, where he spent the next eight years. Since he stopped playing, Edmonds briefly starred with his ex-wife on the Real Housewives of Orange County. He has also worked for the Cardinals as a broadcaster. View the full article
  6. Angels starting pitcher Griffin Canning, who missed much of spring training with an elbow issue, was cleared to resume throwing after a follow-up evaluation this week, General Manager Billy Eppler said Wednesday. Canning underwent a platelet-rich plasma injection on March 6 after several rounds of diagnostic tests failed to show any structural damage that could explain the discomfort in his elbow. The tests showed only “chronic changes,” which amounts to simple wear. Canning will gradually increase the intensity of his throwing, and he could be pitching from a mound by the end of April, Eppler said. The Angels had been preparing to start the season with Canning on the injured list, but the coronavirus shutdown has pushed back the start of the season far enough that the former Santa Margarita High and UCLA standout could be available whenever the season begins. Related Articles Angels’ Andrew Heaney bides his time during coronavirus quarantine Former Angels star Jim Edmonds goes to hospital for coronavirus testing Angels minor leaguer uses coronavirus shutdown to build college recruiting site Reports: MLB, players union reach tentative deal to salvage 2020 season Angels manager Joe Maddon uses coronavirus shutdown to connect with people View the full article
  7. By Joe Haakenson, AngelsWin.com Contributor APRIL 1, 2002 - OFF DAY ANAHEIM -- After a good and relatively healthy spring, the Angels were excited to open the season Sunday night against the Indians. Probably too excited. The Angels lost, 6-0, but were done in during the first inning. Though settled down after it, starting pitcher Jarrod Washburn was erratic in the opening inning, during which he gave up a leadoff walk and five singles. A miscommunication on a relay play between right fielder Tim Salmon and shortstop David Eckstein resulted in an error, also in the first inning. After getting knocked woozy in the top of the first, the Angels simply were blown away by Indians starter Bartolo Colon after that. ''I love opening day,'' said Salmon, who went 0 for 4 with two strikeouts. ''But it seems like it amps you up too much or distracts you. You want to make it happen instead of being under control and taking nice, easy swings.'' About the error, Salmon said: ''I spin to throw to second (on a single by Omar Vizquel) and (Eckstein) is not there. Everybody's excited and we're all trying to be in the right place and make the right play. Sometimes that happens. Eck'll be there 99 percent of the time.'' * Going mostly unrecognized because of the poor start was the work of the bullpen on Sunday. Washburn was done after five innings, leaving three relievers to try to keep it close. Donne Wall, who struggled all of last season with the Mets after coming off shoulder surgery, threw two perfect innings Sunday, striking out two. Lou Pote, who had a poor spring (15.00 ERA), pitched a scoreless inning and didn't allow a hit. Lefty Mark Lukasiewicz gave up one run and three hits in the ninth. ''After the first inning we did some good things on the mound,'' Scioscia said. In case you missed the Angels season opener you can read about it here: View the full article
  8. As Andrew Heaney sits at his home in Oklahoma, working through a list of the top 100 movies of all-time and enjoying the tree blossoms he hasn’t seen in a while at this time of year, he yearns for the day when he can return to the baseball field. Even if it’s in an empty stadium. As the Angels player representative to the union, Heaney was involved in the conference calls that led to last week’s agreement between Major League Baseball and the players about the way this coronavirus shutdown is handled. One of the possibilities is that MLB games could return without fans in the ballparks, if the two sides determine that is a better alternative than waiting longer to begin the season. While Heaney said that “no player wants to play in an empty stadium,” he conceded it could be a good way to get baseball back sooner. “Baseball shows why it’s the national pastime in situations like this, difficult times for our country,” Heaney said via conference call Tuesday. “It seems to me that’s when the sport flexes its muscles. As players we understand that too. Maybe (the word) therapeutic is overboard, but it can be helpful for people in tough times, tough situations, to flip on a game and see their team play.” The scheduled opening day came and went last week, with players mostly quarantined in their homes, unable to so much as hold organized workouts together. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended no gatherings of 50 or more people through at least mid-May, which means the best-case scenario for the resumption of full-squad baseball workouts is a month and a half away. If restrictions on small groups are eased in May, but large groups are still prohibited, one of the options on the table for MLB is to play games in empty stadiums, just to get the season going. Heaney said he’d support that, as well as other changes that may be made at the back end, like a non-traditional playoff structure. “It’s definitely not a normal season, so I can see the benefit of having an abnormal playoff system that would be exciting and intriguing,” Heaney said. “I think there’s a movement within within baseball to start being a little bit more outside-the-box and not quite so traditional. It’s a very slow movement, but I think it’s getting there.” Heaney said he wouldn’t want to see anything “drastically” alter the system to the point that the regular season was rendered insignificant. This regular season will almost certainly be less than the normal 162 games, but Heaney said for now he’s trying to prepare for a full season. “That’s everybody’s goal,” he said. “It may seem far fetched, but that’s everybody’s goal. If you don’t have that mindset, you are going to get caught off guard. If you’re overprepared, it’s better than being underprepared.” Heaney said he’s working out back in Oklahoma with Garrett Williams, another Oklahoma State product whom the Angels acquired as the player to be named in the Zack Cozart trade with the San Francisco Giants. Heaney said he and Williams go for runs, lift weights and play catch in the street. So far he hasn’t thrown a bullpen, but they are “looking for a bullpen catcher in the next week or so,” perhaps using their connections at Oklahoma State. Related Articles Former Angels star Jim Edmonds goes to hospital for coronavirus testing Angels minor leaguer uses coronavirus shutdown to build college recruiting site Reports: MLB, players union reach tentative deal to salvage 2020 season Angels manager Joe Maddon uses coronavirus shutdown to connect with people Alexander: When baseball’s scheduled Opening Day … isn’t Heaney said he’s been texting and talking to some of his teammates, and they have a video conference upcoming. “It will at least be fun to see some people’s faces,” he said. “The quarantine has been tough.” Heaney said he’s ill-equipped for this much free time because he doesn’t play video games or do art or play any musical instruments. “Not a lot to better myself, if I’m being real honest,” he said with a chuckle. “Just kind of working out and watching movies and watching TV. I’m getting good at Monopoly, though, so that’s something.” View the full article
  9. We’re going to come back to advanced statistics in a bit, but for now, let’s take a break for the old-timers and focus on something a bit more vanilla: The Triple Crown statistics--batting average, dingers, ribbies--as well as runs scored and stolen bases. #14: Batting Average (Active Leaders) When you think of what Trout brings to the plate, batting average isn’t the first thing that comes to mind: he’s never led the league, never hit .330, although has settled in as a solid .300 hitter. That said, his .305 lifetime average is good for 4th among active players, behind only Miguel Cabrera (.315), Jose Altuve (.315), and Joe Votto (.307). #15: Home Runs (Through Age 27) Trout is known for his power, however, and is one of the most prolific young home run hitters in baseball history. HR Total Through Age 27 (1871-2019, all players) Alex Rodriguez 345 Jimmie Foxx 302 Eddie Mathews 299 Ken Griffey Jr 294 Mike Trout 285 Albert Pujols 282 Mickey Mantle 280 Mel Ott 275 Giancarlo Stanton 267 Frank Robinson 262 Trout hasn’t hit 50 in a season yet (although would have in 2019 if he hadn’t lost time injury), but he’s hit 40+ twice and 30+ six times. And here’s where we get to the second Amazing Trout Stat related to HR: Trout is one of only seven players to hit 30+ HR six or more times in major league history. Jimmie Foxx, Eddie Mathews, Alex Rodriguez and Albert Pujols did it seven times. Trout, Frank Robinson and Miguel Cabrera have done it six times. As far as the Angels franchise goes, with 285 he’s just 14 behind Angels leader Tim Salmon, with 299. Trout did it in 1199 games, compared to Salmon’s 1672. Only Troy Glaus, with 47 in 2000, has hit more in a single season, with Trout having the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, 11th, and 21st highest yearly totals as an Angel. #16: RBI & Runs (Through Age 27) Usually batting second in the lineup, Trout doesn’t get a ton of RBI opportunities, but he is still not-too-far down the all-time leaderboards for age 27: #16a: 752 RBI, 23rd all-time through age 27. He has scored quite a few runs: #16b: 903 Runs Scored, 10th all-time through age 27. #17: Stolen Bases (SB%) Trout is known for his all-around game, including speed. But after stealinig 49 bases in 2012, he’s only surpassed 30 in 2013 and 2016. That said, where he stands out in his basestealing percentage: Trout is 10th all-time at 84.713%. In case you missed our previous entries:
  10. Hello GoaTrout,

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  11. Jim Edmonds, who began his big-league career with the Angels, wrote on social media on Saturday that he is being tested for the coronavirus. “Held off as long as I could,” Edmonds wrote on Instagram, captioning a photo of him wearing a surgical mask. “Thought I was tough enough to get through. This virus is no joke. #gethealthy” Edmonds, 49, had done some broadcasting with the St. Louis Cardinals in recent seasons, including this spring. He had also become a reality television star via the “Real Housewives of Orange County.” Edmonds wrote that he was still unsure if he had the COVID-19 virus or was simply “super sick.” An eight-time Gold Glove winner, Edmonds broke into the big leagues with the Angels in 1993. He spent parts of seven seasons with the Angels before he was traded to the Cardinals. Edmonds played parts of 17 years in the majors, including stops with the San Diego Padres, Chicago Cubs, Milwaukee Brewers and Cincinnati Reds. View the full article
  12. While most of the country is sequestered at home trying to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Jack Kruger is using his time to spread something else: information. Kruger, a minor-league catcher in the Angels system, has devoted his downtime to enhancing an idea hatched a few years ago. Kruger has created a web site to help high school baseball and softball players through the recruiting process. A product of Oaks Christian High in Westlake Village, Kruger got little attention from college coaches during high school. Although he ended up at Oregon, it was only after he left Oregon and transferred to Orange Coast College that he realized he’d been doing it all wrong. Kruger, who ended up with a scholarship to Mississippi State, said his quest for a Division I college opportunity “grew like wildfire” the second time through. “That’s when I realized everyone needs to be doing this,” he said. “That’s when I knew we had something here.” These days, Kruger is dispensing advice on his site, ballerbuilder.com. All of the information is free, although he said he is working toward eventually selling some videos. “I’m basically trying to help people get out of their own way and understand this chaotic, fluid recruiting system that sucks up a lot of time and money from families that probably don’t have it,” Kruger said. Kruger, 25, got the idea to start helping kids with recruiting as soon as he landed at Mississippi State in the fall of 2015. The Angels drafted him in 2016, after one season with the Bulldogs, and he was focused on his career, which reached Double-A in 2019. In December, he began building the web site, which launched in February. A month later, Kruger suddenly had more time than he or anyone had expected. Kruger was in big-league camp with the Angels when the coronavirus pandemic shut down the sport. Because he’s now limited to doing gym workouts on his own, he said he is spending six to eight hours a day working on the web site. The site has articles about how players can create the most effective videos or write the most effective emails to send to college coaches. Subscribers can receive emails from Kruger a few times a week, highlighting various tips on the recruiting process. “The general principle is we are trying to create a list and write emails and make sure we send the right video,” Kruger said. “That sounds pretty straightforward, but there are a lot of intricacies within that system we can implement that I’ve never heard anyone talk about.” For example, Kruger said players should be sure to closely look at the players that a school currently has to determine the need. “If you’re a catcher and you’re messaging a school that has a freshman All-America catcher, you are kind of wasting your time,” Kruger said. Finding schools that need you is the key, Kruger said. “A lot of people feel they’re lucky if the school talks to them, but the college coaches need good players as much as players need schools,” Kruger said. “That gives players some more power.” Ironically, the same pandemic that has given Kruger time to devote to his site has also put a hold on the recruiting process that he’s trying to explain. Most high school players are unable to play now, and the NCAA currently has established a dead period so coaches can’t do any recruiting. Players are still free to contact coaches and send videos. Kruger said he recommends simply taking this time to prepare everything so as soon as the dead period ends, the emails and videos are ready to send. Related Articles Reports: MLB, players union reach tentative deal to salvage 2020 season Angels manager Joe Maddon uses coronavirus shutdown to connect with people Alexander: When baseball’s scheduled Opening Day … isn’t Angels make a few more roster moves There will be an Angels Opening Day result, thanks to Strat-o-matic Kruger said he has articles on the specific tasks players can be doing during the coronavirus shutdown, in terms of their development as athletes and in marketing their skills. “Its about gaining strength and athleticism,” he said. “Getting outside and continuing to build your body, even if you can’t work on (baseball) skills. I just reassured players that they aren’t falling behind. There is no one out there secretly playing in tournaments and meeting coaches. Everyone is pretty much at a standstill. But there are still things you can do to further your process.” View the full article
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  14. Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association have a deal, ESPN’s Jeff Passan first reported Thursday night. The players have voted on it already. MLB owners are expected to ratify it Friday. The deal draws a path forward as baseball tries to figure out when it will return from the stoppage because of the coronavirus pandemic. In the deal, MLB has the right to shorten the 2020 draft to five rounds, ESPN reported, citing unnamed sources. Additionally, it can delay the start of the international signing period until as late as January 2021. MLB also can shorten the 2021 draft to 20 rounds as well as push back the 2021-22 international signing period to January 2022 through December 2022, per the report. The most important thing for the players: In the event the entire 2020 season is canceled, they will receive full service time, meaning players entering the final year of their contracts such as Mookie Betts, Trevor Bauer, Marcus Stroman, J.T. Realmuto and others would become free agents in November regardless of whether games are played. In addition to the service time issue, because the season will clearly be shorter, the arbitration rules will be adjusted so players are not penalized for putting up counting stats that don’t stack up to past comparables from 162-game seasons. Related Articles Dodgers’ Andrew Friedman preaches ‘perspective’ amid ‘unknowns’ of coronavirus shutdown Angels manager Joe Maddon uses coronavirus shutdown to connect with people Alexander: When baseball’s scheduled Opening Day … isn’t Angels make a few more roster moves There will be an Angels Opening Day result, thanks to Strat-o-matic View the full article
  15. During this unexpected hiatus from what he is normally doing at this time of year, Joe Maddon has immersed himself in 21st century communication. In the past week, the Angels manager has created a video from the seat of his bike, held a video conference with all of his coaches and been interviewed by a pair of college students about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on baseball. “Anything to provide some content and make it interesting, if I can,” Maddon said. “I am trying to help everyone get through this, and promote Angels baseball. … Just trying to figure out a way to stay connected with everybody.” With much of the country quarantined to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus, Maddon has been mostly sequestered with his wife, Jaye, in their luxury recreational vehicle, which is still parked in Arizona. Technology, however, allows him to still reach out to a variety of audiences, including a class of graduate students at George Washington University. About six years ago, Maddon began talking to students – from junior high to college – via video conference. He said it was his way to help use technology to connect baseball to the next generation. Maddon estimated he’s done about 40 to 50 such sessions since then, mostly from hotels while on the road. They are arranged by Rick Vaughn, the former Tampa Bay Rays PR man who is now Executive Director of Respect 90, Maddon’s charitable organization. Vaughn worked for the Baltimore Orioles when he met former Orioles beat writer Mark Hyman, who is now a professor of management and tourism studies at GWU in Washington. Hyman was set to teach a class on the business of spring training. He had arranged for his class of 18 students to visit Arizona during the final week of spring training, but the coronavirus shutdown changed those plans. Hyman converted the class to one exploring the impact of COVID-19 on spring training, as told through the eyes of journalists, economists, political figures and – thanks to Vaughn – one manager. “I think it’s impressive that (Maddon) would take a half hour out of his day to meet with college students who he doesn’t know and he doesn’t have any particular connection to,” Hyman said. “From the perspective of a college professor, there is no substitute for students meeting people in decision-making roles.” Thomas Simpson, who is pursuing his Master of Business Administration, was one of the two students to interview Maddon. They will share the interview with their classmates, who are meeting remotely, next week. “Joe was amazing,” Simpson said. “We were really happy he would take this time during a time of crisis to speak with two graduate students.” Maddon, who also plans to video conference with kids this summer through a program run by the Angels, said he also gains something from those type of chats with students. “It’s fascinating to me to be challenged by guys like that,” he said. “They make you think about exactly what I’m doing.” Simpson said he and his classmate, Thomas Luther, spoke to Maddon for about 20 minutes using Blackboard, an app for online teaching. Maddon talked to them about the logistics of what happened when spring training was shut down, and also about leadership in general. “He was very engaging and very positive,” Simpson said. “He said, ‘This is how I view myself as a leader, not only in the baseball community, but in a time of crisis.’” Maddon has said on multiple occasions since the sport shut down that he feels it’s important to spread positivity and create a distraction at a time when there is so much bad news. That’s why he strapped a video camera on to his helmet for a 30-minute bike ride around the RV park in Arizona earlier this week. Maddon essentially told stories about his minor-league baseball career during a stream of consciousness monologue, allowing viewers to listen as they watched the scenery go by. Related Articles Alexander: When baseball’s scheduled Opening Day … isn’t Angels make a few more roster moves There will be an Angels Opening Day result, thanks to Strat-o-matic Memorable Opening Days from Angels seasons past Angels GM Billy Eppler said team still clear of coronavirus as players work out on their own Maddon said he plans to do more of that, perhaps narrating as he walks around various landmarks of Angels history in Arizona. He also may do a little cooking instruction with his crock pot in the RV, he said. Besides that, he has plans for continued video meetings with his coaches and players, all in an effort to keep everyone engaged and motivated while baseball is in an indefinite hiatus. “If you permit yourself, you can fill your day up pretty easily,” Maddon said. “This is something I have never really gotten into before. Right now, I think social media is as important as it’s ever been.” View the full article
  16. Years ago, Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post turned a collection of columns and essays on baseball into a book called “Why Time Begins On Opening Day.” If you follow the sport, I’m guessing you understand the premise of the title perfectly. But what if there’s no Opening Day? Thursday was supposed to be 2020’s grand beginning. The Dodgers were to play the Giants at home. Clayton Kershaw would be on the mound, a sign that the world had returned to normal, and the renovations to Dodger Stadium were to be open to the public. The Angels were supposed to start their season in Houston, likely the only place in baseball where the Astros would still have a friendly audience. Andrew Heaney would pitch and Houston resident Anthony Rendon, who had already tormented his hometown team last October as a Washington National, would be making his debut as Mike Trout’s protection in the lineup. Normal? We wish. Right now the world is anything but, and what had been a highly anticipated baseball season – especially in Los Angeles – is on hold for an undetermined period because of a pandemic unprecedented in most of our lifetimes. That is the worst part. The necessity of stopping spring training and shutting down camps means that when it’s safe to resume activity, whenever that might be, everybody will need at least a couple of weeks’ preparation time and maybe more before seasons open. Under those conditions, June 1 is an overly optimistic projection. We might be looking at mid-June, July 1 or even later, depending on when (or if) the novel coronavirus outbreak begins to wane. And when it’s safe to play ball again, what happens then? A 100-game schedule, packed with doubleheaders? An 80-game dash? An expanded playoff field at season’s end? Or some kind of crazy-quilt postseason format of which none of us would have dared dream? Maybe it will be a postseason that lasts into November or even December, played exclusively in warm weather cities or domes. Or best-of-five series across the board. Or maybe multiple play-in games with four or more wild card teams, or even an “everybody plays” wild card tournament. From this hiatus, and this crisis, could spring an inventiveness we’d never envisioned from the Lords of Baseball. Nah, probably not. Yes, we’re in uncharted territory. But this is the sport that had to be convinced to let the kids play, and that message still hasn’t gotten through to everybody in MLB. The issue isn’t necessarily thinking outside the box as much as getting all of the stakeholders to agree. Meanwhile, how might this delay affect the 2020 All-Star Game currently scheduled for July 14, the extravaganza that the Dodgers have waited to host for, oh, only 40 years? Does MLB scrub it for a year and give the Dodgers the 2021 game instead? Or, in echoes of 1981 when the All-Star Game in Cleveland was the first game back after a 50-day strike, would the 2020 All-Star Game become the sport’s Opening Day? (Worth noting: In that ’81 game in Cleveland, there were six Dodgers on the National League roster. You put six Dodgers on the NL roster this time, whenever the game takes place, and you won’t be able to contain the joy in The Ravine.) There are so many variables to ponder. Would a shorter season bring the Dodgers back to the National League pack, the advantage of their roster depth neutralized? Would it help the Angels, perhaps masking their starting pitching deficiencies and allowing Shohei Ohtani to be the ace from day one? Or might another team emerging from back in the pack – the Padres, let’s say – take full advantage of that all-out sprint, or an altered playoff format, to steal a series and perhaps even a championship? (Remember: Under more normal circumstances in 2019, the Nationals almost got Manager Dave Martinez fired early in the season. They entered the eighth inning of the NL wild card game trailing Milwaukee 3-1 and facing down Josh Hader. They were down two games to one to the Dodgers in the best-of-five division series. They didn’t win a home game in the World Series, and they still wound up winning the whole thing. Anything is possible.) Beyond those considerations, here’s something that will make Dodger fans shudder even more: If the season somehow is canceled completely, as The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reported on Wednesday, the deal being negotiated between management and the Players Association would give players the same amount of service time in 2020 that they had earned in 2019. In other words, Mookie Betts could become a free agent without having ever played a game for the Dodgers. The flip side: How would a canceled season affect clubs’ ability to offer the kind of contract Betts would ask for? Again, nobody knows. But in all of this uncertainty it is safe to assume this: When and if this season finally starts, anyone offering excuses should be publicly shamed. It’s not fair and it’s not ideal, but they’re dealt this hand and they’ll play it. “How many times have you guys heard this: ‘It’s a long season.’ ‘It’s a marathon.’ ‘It’s early,’” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said during a YouTube session this week with team announcers Joe Davis and Orel Hershiser. “Once we get going in ’20, you better not hear that. You won’t hear that from our guys. It’s going to be a sprint. Yeah, it’s interesting to see how we’re built for the course of 162 (games), and you talk about depth and all that stuff. But once that season gets shortened, it’ll be a sprint. It’ll be interesting to see how it all plays out.” We can hardly wait. But we know that we must. View the full article
  17. We’re not quite done with WAR yet. In previous installments, the focus has been on Mike Trout in terms of all-time WAR and single season WAR. What about peak era? Specifically, how does Trout match up against his peers over his career, and how does his full-time span of eight years match up against all-time greats? #12: Dominance Over Peers (2012-19 WAR) Trout has been a full-time player since 2012, a span of eight years. The first Amazing Trout Stat in this installment is 2012-19 WAR. Here are the WAR leaders during Trout’s full-time career: Top Ten WAR Leaders: 2012-19 Mike Trout 72.7 Buster Posey 47.1 Josh Donaldson 41.8 Paul Goldschmidt 38.6 Andrew McCutchen 37.7 Mookie Betts 37.2 Bryce Harper 35.1 Joey Votto 34.9 Jose Altuve 34.8 Robinson Cano 34.7 Now consider what that means: Not only has he contribute +25.6 WAR above everyone else, or +3.2 per year, but he has contributed more WAR value than any two players ranked #6 or lower. Meaning, add #6 (Betts) to anyone below him, and Trout has contributed more value than both players combined. Let’s look at this visually: I think that image speaks for itself. While Posey is solidly above the rest of the field, everyone else evenly tapers off. Trout is a giant among lesser men. But to add one more number to the mix, Trout’s 72.7 WAR is 154% better than #2 during that same time-span, Buster Posey. Meaning, he’s more than one-and-half times the value of the second most productive player of his era. #13: Eight-Year Spans (1871-2019) How does Trout’s eight-year span compare to other all-time greats? Well, I calculated every eight-year span in the history of baseball going back to 1871, and came up with the following list (note that I only included the very best span of each player): Best Eight-Year Spans (1871-2019) Babe Ruth 89.7 (1920-27) Ted Williams 77.1 (1939-42, 46-49*) Rogers Hornsby 76.9 (1920-27) Honus Wagner 76.0 (1902-09) Barry Bonds 75.6 (1997-2004) Willie Mays 75.3 (1958-65) Lou Gehrig 74.1 (1927-34) Mike Trout 72.7 (2012-19) Mickey Mantle 72.1 (1954-61) Ty Cobb 72.0 (1910-17) *For Williams I didn’t include the absent or partial years lost to WWII. As you can see, the only comparable players in the post-WWII era are Mays, Mantle, and Bonds. Every one else played in the first half of the century, in a very different context (e.g. eight-team leagues, no black players, fewer relief pitchers). In other words, Trout truly is the modern era version of Mays or Mantle, and doing so while playing in a more difficult context. As a side note, if you’re wondering where Bonds would rank with only pre-1998 spans, his best “untainted” eight-year span is 1990-97, when he accumulated 69.5 WAR—still good enough to be #10. One final note: While this is an exciting statistic to contemplate, it is highly unlikely that Trout will ever do better. His first two years are also his highest WAR totals at 10.1 and 10.2, in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Still, I think he looks just fine as the eighth-best eight-year span in major league history (or 32nd best if you count every span of every player), or the second best of the post-WWII era. View the full article
  18. A day before the season was scheduled to begin, the Angels made a few more roster moves to slightly clear up the picture of how they envision their roster when the season finally starts. The Angels optioned pitchers Luke Bard and Ryan Buchter, outfielder Michael Hermosillo and first baseman Jared Walsh to Triple-A. With Opening Day at least two months away because of the coronavirus pandemic, it might be too early to read too much into these moves. It’s also possible that the season will open with teams having expanded rosters, which means there could be more spots up for grabs for the players who have already been optioned. Buchter, a non-roster invite, was just added to the 40-man roster, a move that allows the Angels to keep him in the organization regardless of whether he’s in the majors. Optioning Hermosillo could mean the Angels plan to use David Fletcher a significant amount of the time in right field, so Fletcher would essentially be the fourth outfielder. Sending down Walsh likely means that Matt Thaiss has the inside track on the job at first base when Albert Pujols is on the bench or the DH. Walsh had missed time with an elbow injury before the shutdown, so Thaiss had been in the driver’s seat in that competition. Taylor Cole, who had been designated for assignment to create a 40-man spot for Buchter, also cleared waivers and remained in the organization. Related Articles There will be an Angels Opening Day result, thanks to Strat-o-matic Memorable Opening Days from Angels seasons past Angels GM Billy Eppler said team still clear of coronavirus as players work out on their own Angels add lefty reliever Ryan Buchter to 40-man roster Angels scouting director Matt Swanson preparing for draft, even with coronavirus shutdown leaving no games to scout View the full article
  19. Strat-o-matic, the company that produces the classic sports simulation games, will be simulating the 2020 season to help fans get through the absence of real games because of the coronavirus pandemic. Each day at 11 a.m. PT, starting on the scheduled Opening Day on Thursday, Strat-o-matic will release on its website and other social outlets the results of that day’s simulations. Strat-o-matic was created in 1948 as a board game, with cards representing each player and dice used to determine the results. It’s all calculated so the players will perform as they did in real life during a given season. Now, the game also has a computer version, which they will use to run the 2020 season simulation. The company has also enlisted the help of fans and some media members to help them with the most realistic lineups to feed into the computer. I gave them their Angels lineup for the opener against the Houston Astros, who will start right-hander Zack Greinke: David Fletcher 2B Mike Trout CF Anthony Rendon 3B Shohei Ohtani DH Justin Upton LF Albert Pujols 1B Brian Goodwin RF Andrelton Simmons SS Jason Castro C The starting pitcher will be LHP Andrew Heaney. I don’t think this is exactly the lineup that Joe Maddon would use, because I think he wants Tommy La Stella to play second against all right-handed pitchers. If Fletcher were to crack Maddon’s Opening Day lineup against a righty, it would probably be in right field. Check out the results on Thursday and see how my lineup performed. Related Articles Memorable Opening Days from Angels seasons past Angels GM Billy Eppler said team still clear of coronavirus as players work out on their own Angels add lefty reliever Ryan Buchter to 40-man roster Angels scouting director Matt Swanson preparing for draft, even with coronavirus shutdown leaving no games to scout Angels manager Joe Maddon optimistic about season despite coronavirus shutdown View the full article
  20. The Angels were supposed to be opening the 2020 season on Thursday in Houston against the Astros, with a powerful offense led by three-time MVP Mike Trout and newcomer Anthony Rendon. Like any Opening Day, the optimism would have been high around the Angels, even though some figured they may not have enough pitching. Unfortunately for the Angels and their fans, the question of pitching now seems trivial compared with what the baseball world – the world, actually – faces. The coronavirus crisis has shut down much of the country, including the national pastime. With no baseball Thursday, and no guarantee the season will start at all in 2020, we are taking a look back at some of the most memorable Angels openers in their first 59 seasons. April 27, 1961 Of course, you have to start at the beginning. Three years after the Dodgers brought Major League Baseball to Southern California, the region saw the debut of an American League expansion team, the Angels. They opened their inaugural season on the road in Baltimore. On April 11, Eli Grba took the mound for the Angels against an Orioles team that was building its way toward being a dynasty later in the decade. Ted Kluszewski, a former home run champ who was starting what would be the final season of his career, belted homers in each of the first two innings, helping the Angels to a 7-0 lead. Grba pitched a complete game, allowing six hits, and the Angels would roll to a 7-2 victory. Unfortunately for the Angels, they lost the next eight games, including their home debut. Former Angel owner Jackie Autry, Angel right fielder Tim Salmon and Dr. Tom Amberry, 42 year Angel season ticket holder, raise the official World Championship flag before the start of the home opener in 2003.March 30, 2003 Never mind that the Angels lost 6-3 to the Texas Rangers in a nationally televised Sunday night opener. Most of the 43,525 fans who filled Angel Stadium that night likely were satisfied with the evening before the first pitch, because the Angels celebrated their World Series title from 2002. It took the franchise 18 years to even make the playoffs, and another 13 years to win a postseason series, so the fans were starved for a title. They unfurled the championship banner in a pregame ceremony. The crowd chanted “USA, USA, USA,” as baseball fandom mingled with national pride amid the Gulf War. But once the game began, it didn’t go the Angels’ way. John Lackey, who had won Game 7 of the 2002 World Series, started the 2003 season on the same mound and was charged with five runs in five innings. April 6, 1999 In the first inning of the season, the Angels’ new $80 million man, Mo Vaughn, fell into the first-base dugout chasing a foul ball and twisted his ankle. Vaughn would miss the next two weeks. It was the fitting start to what would be one of the more tumultuous seasons in the franchise’s history. By the time the season was over, the Angels would have a player mutiny that led to the resignation of manager Terry Collins. They finished 70-92, a season that still stands as their worst since 1980. However, despite that ominous start to the opener on April 6, the Angels actually won a thrilling 6-5 game over the Cleveland Indians. The Angels scored twice in the seventh to tie the game and once in the eighth to take the lead, overcoming a rare out when Tim Salmon was hit by a batted ball running the bases. Troy Glaus then doubled home the go-ahead run. Troy Percival finished it off with a perfect ninth, retiring Roberto Alomar, Jim Thome and Manny Ramirez. Alomar and Thome are in the Hall of Fame, and the steroid-tainted Ramirez has Hall of Fame numbers. Los Angeles Angels’ Chris Iannetta drives in two runs with a single off Cincinnati Reds relief pitcher J.J. Hoover in the 13th inning of an opening day baseball game, Monday, April 1, 2013, in Cincinnati. Los Angeles won 3-1. (AP Photo/David Kohl)April 9, 2013 Mike Trout was unanimously selected as the Rookie of the Year in 2012, but he wasn’t on the roster on opening day, so the April 1 opener marked Trout’s first appearance on a big-league roster to start the season. It was also Josh Hamilton’s debut in an Angels uniform. In retrospect, Hamilton’s tenure with the Angels came up far short of expectations, but back when the 2013 season began, there were high hopes for a team that could put Trout, Hamilton and Albert Pujols in the middle of the lineup. The game was also historic because the Angels were visiting the Cincinnati Reds in the first interleague game on Opening Day. The Houston Astros had been moved from the National League to the American League that season, leaving 15 teams in each league and requiring at least one interleague game each day. Jered Weaver got the start for the Angels, the fifth of his his seven Opening Day starts. Weaver gave up one run in six innings, long gone by the time the Angels pulled out a 3-1 win in 13 innings, equaling the Angels’ longest opener. Chris Iannetta drove in all three Angels runs, with a homer in the third and a two-run single in the 13th. Anaheim Stadium, known as “Big A,” is seen at full capacity on the first day of its opening as the California Angels host the San Francisco Giants in an exhibition game on April 9, 1966. The 230-foot-high letter “A,” with a halo at its top, in left field serves as a scoreboard support. (AP Photo)April 1, 1998 Angel Stadium had been through a few different looks since the club began playing at its current site in 1966, but in 1998 it opened to what is essentially its current design. The renovation had taken more than a year. Related Articles Angels GM Billy Eppler said team still clear of coronavirus as players work out on their own Angels add lefty reliever Ryan Buchter to 40-man roster Angels scouting director Matt Swanson preparing for draft, even with coronavirus shutdown leaving no games to scout Angels manager Joe Maddon optimistic about season despite coronavirus shutdown Angels contribute $1 million for employees who miss work because of coronavirus shutdown Edison Field, as it was known at the time, played host to the New York Yankees for the April 1 opener. The weather put something of a damper on the festivities, though. Rain throughout the day forced the Angels to bring in two helicopters to hover over the field to try to dry it out more quickly. The game began nearly an hour late because of the weather, but the Angels then came out and beat the powerful Yankees 4-1. Chuck Finley gave up one run in seven innings, and the Angels scored all their runs in the fourth. They beat the Yankees 10-2 the next night, hanging two losses on a team that would go on to win 114 regular-season games and the World Series. The plaque outside Angel Stadium from 1998 commemorating when Anaheim Stadium was rededicated as Edison International Field of Anaheim and the Angels were called The Anaheim Angels.///ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: AngelsName Ð 12/31/14 Ð LEONARD ORTIZ, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER – _LOR5927.NEF – his story is about the 10th anniversary of the Angels name change from Anaheim Angels to Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Please take photos at the Angels team store at the stadium. The vast majority of merchandise states Angels only. There’s one T-shirt and hat that has a retro LA on it from the days when team was actually in LA. You’ll see a row of T-shirts/hats in the middle with a bunch of retro logo items.On the outside of the stadium near the store, there are some plaques with city of Anaheim and Anaheim Angels reference.Around the stadium, there are signs that state Angel Stadium of Anaheim — on the outside of the stadium at main entrance and on the big A.View the full article
  21. As the previously scheduled Opening Day of the major league season approaches on Thursday, Angels players are scattered around the country, doing little baseball activity because the start of the season is nowhere in sight. “We are really limited as to what we can do,” General manager Billy Eppler said via conference call on Tuesday. “The health and safety of everybody in the Angel organization is paramount and that’s where your mind goes first. Then how do we keep them in shape as best as we can knowing there’s not a lot of resources.” On the former point, no Angels players or staffers have shown any of the symptoms of the coronavirus, Eppler said. As for the latter, the facilities at Angel Stadium and in Tempe, Ariz., are both closed to all players except those rehabbing from injuries. The rest of the players are on their own, isolated because of the COVID-19 crisis that has shut down much of the nation. “I caught wind of a couple guys running some hill sprints or doing a little hill jogging,” Eppler said. “Pitchers are keeping their arms activated. A few guys are getting off the mound.” Eppler said the starting pitchers have been asked to throw two bullpen sessions within the next six days, likely using the resources they have at their disposal in a normal winter. They could be throwing at a local college or high school, borrowing a catcher. Eppler said the Angels actually shipped out baseballs to some of the pitchers who needed them. Griffin Canning may resume throwing sometime next week, once he gets four weeks beyond the platelet-rich plasma injection he received on Mar. 6. Canning was shut down early in the spring because of elbow discomfort, which so far has not been attributed to any sort of structural damage. “All indications are he feels great,” Eppler said. Shohei Ohtani has been playing catch on flat ground, and could be throwing off a mound in a couple weeks, Eppler said. Ohtani is expected to return to two-way duty this season after missing last season as a pitcher because of Tommy John surgery. The Angels had planned on delaying the start of his season as a pitcher until mid-May anyway, and now no one will play any games before then. Otherwise, Eppler said he’s been in contact with the coaches, other parts of the baseball operations department and Major League Baseball, which has held regular conference calls to help plot out the uncertain return to action. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that no gatherings of at least 50 people occur before May 10, so that likely delays the start of season until late May, at the earliest. Related Articles Angels add lefty reliever Ryan Buchter to 40-man roster Angels scouting director Matt Swanson preparing for draft, even with coronavirus shutdown leaving no games to scout Angels manager Joe Maddon optimistic about season despite coronavirus shutdown Angels contribute $1 million for employees who miss work because of coronavirus shutdown Reviewing our 5 Angels questions before the coronavirus shutdown With players still unable to prepare normally, Eppler said they are planning to adjust on the fly whenever MLB gives them the green light. Teams are expected to get at least a few weeks for another “mini spring training” before the season starts. “People always talk about or always think about what’s ideal and what you would prefer to have,” Eppler said, “but I tend to look at it as if there’s more than one way to try to solve a problem. If we’re given X amount of time, we’ll make whatever amount of time we’re given work. There’s so many things that MLB can do to assist clubs. If we’re given a shorter window to get ready, maybe one of the considerations is a bigger roster size. I think there’s a number of things that people could discuss and get our players and get us in the position where we’re not putting people at risk, but we’re able to begin playing sooner rather than later. I think that’s what everybody would want.” View the full article
  22. Hello Jay1203,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

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  23. Hello Davepool,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

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  24. #7-11: 8, 9, and 10 WAR SEASONS For this installment we'll combine several variations on the Wins Above Replacement (WAR) metric with regards 8, 9, and 10 WAR seasons, each of which deserves its own entry as Amazing Trout Stats. But first, some context. If you want to skip to the five Amazing Trout Stats, they're summarized at the end. 8+ WAR And What It Means Historically One of the things I like about WAR, and probably why it has become so ubiquitous in baseball discussion, is that it is a statistic that factors in everything a player does, and represents it with a single number that has representational meaning. As a general rule, a 2-3 WAR player is an average regular. Or more exactly, the median among all qualifying players in a given year is around 2.7 WAR. 3-4 are good players, 4-5 are borderline stars, 5-6 all-star caliber, and somewhere between 6 and 7 WAR transitions into superstars, with 7 WAR and above being bonafide MVP candidates. If a player has an 8 WAR or above, he’s a candidate for the best player in the majors. But 9 WAR is where we get to truly special seasons, and 10 WAR is historic. From 1871 through 2019—a span of 149 years of recorded data—there have been 15,444 qualifying player seasons. Of those, only 54 have been 10 WAR or higher; 140 have been 9 WAR or higher and 277 8 WAR or higher. Meaning, historically speaking, there’s been about one 10 WAR season every three years, one 9 WAR season per year, and two 8+ WAR seasons a year. But what about recently? Over the last decade, 2010-19, there have been four 10 WAR seasons, nine 9+ WAR seasons, and twenty-two 8+ WAR seasons. Or to sum up: A 9 WAR season happens usually only about once per year, or a bit less. There are two, occasionally three, 8 WAR seasons in a given year. For the sake of context, here are the numbers for the last decade, including all 4,466 player seasons with at least 100 PA: WAR Distribution 2010-19 (100+ PA) 10 WAR: 4 (one every 0.4 years) 9 WAR: 9 (one every 0.9 years) 8 WAR: 22 (2.2 every year) 7 WAR: 53 (5.3 per year) 6 WAR: 115 (11.5 per year) 5 WAR: 238 (23.8 per year) 4 WAR: 440 (44 per year) 3 WAR: 764 (76.4 per year) 2 WAR: 1320 (132 per year) 1 WAR: 2160 (216 per year) 0 WAR: 3400 (340 per year) Negative WAR: 1066 (106.7 per year) Why 100 PA? Because that cuts out just about every NL pitcher, and it also is a solid, if arbitrary, number to represent any player who spent significant time in the major leagues. Of those 4466 player seasons, only 1429—about a third—are qualifying (502 PA), but 100 PA is as good a number as any to represent “major leaguer,” whether full or part time, injured or healthy. To put that in context, 8 WAR seasons represent just under half a percent (0.49%) of all player seasons with at least 100 PA—or one out of every 200 major leaguers (100+ PA). Among qualifiers, it is 1.54%. 9 WAR seasons are even more rarified: 0.2% of 100 PA seasons, or 0.63% of qualifiers. 10 WAR? 0.09% of 100 PA, 0.28% of qualifers. So we’re in rare company, indeed, when we get to 8 WAR. 10 WAR has a certain magic to it, but the vast majority of those were distributed in the first half of major league history, as single season WAR has tightened up, probably due to higher quality of competition (meaning, there are fewer outliers). Remember that Babe Ruth only faced seven different pitching staffs in every year of his career, staffs that relied on starters pitching most or all of the game, without fresh relievers and specialists coming in later in the game. Or let's look at it visually: Ruth is the only player to surpass 13 WAR, which he did four times, including a ridiculous 15.0 in 1923 (that lone green box way up above everything else). He has two more 12 WAR seasons, with Barry Bonds (twice), Lou Gehrig and Rogers Hornsby filling out the ranks of the ten 12 WAR seasons. What about 11 WAR? There have been 25 in all, but from 1949 to the present--the last 71 years--there have been only seven such seasons: two by Mickey Mantle in the 1950s, one by Carl Yastrzemski in 1967, one by Joe Morgan in 1975, and three by Barry Bonds in the early 2000s. The point being, aside from Bonds’ asterisked later years, there hasn’t been an 11 WAR season since 1975—that’s 45 years ago. This, again, is likely due to the wider distribution of talent. As I said earlier, there’s been about one 9 WAR per season historically, although in the latter half the rate has gone down to about one every year. In other words, 9 WAR is quite special. If you reached 9 WAR, chances are you were the best player that year. If you reach 8 WAR, you're one of the two or three best. If you reach 7 WAR, you're great--an MVP candidate--but probably not the best player in the game. What About Trout? But this series is about Mike Trout, right? All of the above is context to, once again, highlight just how amazing #27 is. Trout has played eight full years, although in one (2017) he missed significant playing time, appearing in only 114 games, but just enough to qualify (507 PA). In seven of those eight seasons, he surpassed 8 WAR. In five seasons, 9 WAR, and in two seasons, 10 WAR (Baseball Reference is slightly different, giving him six, four, and three, respectively). What that means brings us to this amazing statistic, the first of our Amazing Trout Statistics: #7a - Share of Great Seasons (1901-2019): Mike Trout accounts for two (or 3.7%) of the 54 10 WAR seasons, five of the 140 9 WAR seasons (3.6%), and eight of 277 8 WAR seasons (2.9%). In other words, Trout alone has contributed one out of every 29 or so truly great seasons in major league history, plus or minus a few, depending upon which benchmark you use. #7b - Share of Great Seasons (1970-2019): If we narrow to the last half century, when the outliers diminished greatly, Trout's accomplishments are even more impressive: Two of 13 10 WAR seasons (15.4%), five of 48 9 WAR seasons (10.4%), and eight of 110 8 WAR seasons (7.3%). There are many ways to slice the cake, all of which very favorable for Trout. How many players in major league history have a similar resume of great seasons? Well, this brings us to three more Amazing Trout Stats: #8 - Players with seven 8 WAR seasons: Ruth and Willie Mays 11 each, Bonds 10, Honus Wagner, Rogers Hornsby, Lou Gehrig, and Ted Williams 8, Eddie Collins and Mike Trout 7 each. #9 - Players with five 9 WAR seasons: Ruth 10, Hornsby and Bonds 8 each, Mays 7, Wagner, Williams, and Alex Rodriguez 6 each, Collins, Ty Cobb, and Trout 5 each. #10 - Players with two 10 WAR seasons: Ruth 9, Hornsby 6, Bonds 5, Mays and Williams 4 each, Cobb and Mantle 3 each, Wagner, Gehrig and Trout 2 each. Look at that list—every single one of them (in bold-face)--except for Trout--are in the top 14 of career WAR: Babe Ruth 168.4 Barry Bonds 164.4 Willie Mays 149.9 Ty Cobb 149.3 Honus Wagner 138.1 Hank Aaron 136.2 Tris Speaker 130.4 Ted Williams 130.4 Rogers Hornsby 130.3 Stan Musial 126.8 Eddie Collins 120.5 Lou Gehrig 116.3 Alex Rodriguez 113.7 Mickey Mantle 112.3 47. Mike Trout 73.4 And now for the fifth in this installment: #11 - The Sacred Seven: Trout is one of only seven players in baseball history who reached all three benchmarks -- along with Honus Wagner, Babe Ruth, Rogers Hornsby, Ted Williams, Willie Mays, and Barry Bonds Meaning, Trout is one of seven players--arguably the seven greatest in baseball history--to reach all three benchmarks. Collins, Cobb, Gehrig, and Rodriguez miss the cut in at least one category.Perhaps even more impressive is who is notably absent from any of the three benchmarks, inner circle Hall of Famers such as Hank Aaron, Tris Speaker, Stan Musial, Mel Ott, Mike Schmidt, Rickey Henderson, Frank Robinson, Joe Morgan, Jimmie Foxx, and everyone else. In other words, in terms of the number of MVP caliber or better seasons, Trout has—through only his age 27 season—established himself among the very best of the best. And at 28 this year, he’s far from finished. Among other feats of prowess, he has a good chance of becoming only the fourth player with double-digit 8 WAR seasons (along with Ruth, Bonds, and Mays). SUMMARY OF AMAZING TROUT STATS #7-11: #7a - Share of Great Seasons (MLB History): Among 12,991 qualifying seaons from 1901 to 2019, or 119 years, Mike Trout accounts for two of the 54 10 WAR seasons (3.7%), five of the 140 9 WAR seasons (3.6%), and eight of 277 8 WAR seasons (2.9%). In other words, Trout alone has contributed one out of every 29 or so truly great seasons in major league history, plus or minus a few, depending upon which benchmark you use. #7b - Share of Great Seasons (Modern Era): Among 6,988 qualifying seasons from 1970-2019, or 50 years, Trout has contributed two of 13 10 WAR seasons (15.4%), five of 48 9 WAR seasons (10.4%), and eight of 110 8 WAR seasons (7.3%). #8 - 8 WAR Seasons: He's one of only nine players with seven 8 WAR seasons. #9 -9 WAR Seasons: He's one of only ten players with five 9 WAR seasons. #10 - 10 WAR Seasons: He's one of only ten players with 10 WAR seasons. #11 - Combination of 8-9-10 WAR Seasons: He's one of only seven players with least seven 8 WAR seasons, five 9 WAR seasons, and two 10 WAR seasons.
  25. My dear friends & AngelsWin.com family, I don't normally post content on our Blog that is non-Angels or Baseball related, but after getting permission to interview one of our members at AngelsWin.com, it would be a disservice to all and criminal not to share. What you're about to read below is from one of our own who has been on the frontline as a firefighter in LA County for 30-years and has been through the riots, more firestorms than he can ever tell you, earthquakes, and just about every single kind of call of distress that you can imagine. According to our AngelsWin.com member @PattyD22: This virus is like nothing anybody has ever seen. I was exposed and had it in early February, and was sick for about 5 days. This was WAY before the media dedicated coverage on it 24/7 and long before the President and our own department even knew much about it. I’m 52 and I’m in good health, so I beat it, but I still have a residual, chronic dry cough. I'm still working my shifts and we currently have 11 guys who have tested positive so far and are under quarantine. When it’s all said and done, our medical director of the LA County Fire Dept thinks we will have anywhere between 500-1000 first responders testing positive and subsequently, we may have a few die from it. Disclaimer: The information provided below is from Mark Henderson, a nuclear physicist who has dealt with world diseases for some time and was Integral with the CERN in Switzerland. He is now working on nuclear fusion with the ITER project as documented in the film "Let There Be Light" which will be viewable on Amazon Prime. You should always consult with a licensed physician over any information that is passed on, you hear on the news or read online, including the content provided below. This virus could mutate or newer tests could reveal that the practices listed below could deem unsuccessful. The WHO (World Health Organization) received information from a young researcher who had been transferred from Shenzhen to Wuhan to collaborate with the task force that is fighting the coronavirus epidemic. We want to receive and willingly transmit to all of this clear, simple and accessible information, which describe exactly what it is. The virus, how it transfers from one person to another and how it can be neutralized in everyday life. Corona virus infection does not cause a cold with a dripping nose or catarrhal cough, but a dry and dry cough: this is the easiest thing to know. Consuming hot drinks such as tea, herbal tea and broth during the day, or simply hot water: hot liquids, including water consumption, helps to maintain a healthy immune system along with sufficient sleep. 1. The virus crown is quite large (diameter about 400-500 nanometers), therefore most medical quality masks can stop it. If you are not exhibiting symptoms, wearing a mask has little value unless you are in contact with infected patients so the situation is different for doctors and health professionals who are exposed to heavy virus loads and have to use special equipment. If an infected person sneezes in front of you, three or more meters away, they will drop the virus on the ground and should prevent it from landing on you in an open-air environment. Closed quarters may require additional physical distance, so be mindful and use common sense and practice social/physical distancing. 2. When the virus is found on metal surfaces, it survives for about 12 hours. So when you touch metal surfaces such as handles, doors, appliances, supports on trams, etc., wash your hands well and disinfect them carefully. 3. The virus can live nested in clothes and fabrics for about 12 hours: normal detergents and a sufficient wash cycle should help to mitigate the virus but again wash your hands before and after doing laundry if you suspect your clothes may be contaminated. How it manifests itself: 1. The virus first installs itself in the throat, causing inflammation and a dry throat sensation: this symptom can last for 3 to 4 days. 2. The virus travels through the humidity present in the airways, descends into the trachea and installs in the lung, causing pneumonia. This step takes about 5 to 6 days. 3. Pneumonia occurs with high fever and difficulty breathing, it is not accompanied by the classic cold. But you may have the feeling of drowning. In this case, contact your doctor immediately. How can you avoid it: 1. Virus transmission occurs mostly by direct contact, touching tissues or materials on which the virus is present: washing hands frequently is essential. The virus only survives on your hands for about ten minutes, but in ten minutes many things can happen: rub your eyes or scratch your nose for example, and allow the virus to enter your throat ... So, for your own good and for the good of others, wash your hands very often and disinfect them! 2. You can gargle with an antiseptic mouthwash, hot salt water or any doctor recommended solution that eliminates or minimizes the amount of the virus that could enter your throat: in doing so, you can potentially flush it before it goes down into the trachea and then into the lungs. 3. Disinfect the PC keyboard and mobile phones. The new coronavirus NCP may not show signs of infection for many days, before which it cannot be known if a person is infected. But by the time you have a fever and / or cough and go to the hospital, your lungs are usually already in 50% fibrosis and it's too late! Taiwanese experts suggest doing a simple check that we can do on our own every morning: Take a deep breath and hold your breath for more than 10 seconds. If you successfully complete it without coughing, without discomfort, a sense of oppression, etc., this is an indication that there is no fibrosis in the lungs. In such critical times, do this check every morning in a clean air environment! To reiterate, if you believe you have the symptoms of coronavirus, contact a trained medical doctor/physician and obtain expert advice, your health is paramount. Share this information with your family, friends and acquaintances, for solidarity and civic sense!