AngelsWin.com

Administrators
  • Content Count

    261,902
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Everything posted by AngelsWin.com

  1. Hello JBR,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  2. Hello DMax,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  3. Hello tntoriole,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  4. When Anaheim released details of a proposed Angel Stadium deal on Wednesday, Dec. 4, the praise and criticism began almost immediately. The topic of debate is a potential agreement through which the city would sell the 153-acre Angel Stadium property, stadium included, for $325 million; the buyer is a business entity in which team owner Arte Moreno is a partner. Moreno would also commit his team to play baseball in Anaheim until at least 2050, and the city has requested other benefits that are being hammered out. The deal, which still needs the Anaheim City Council’s approval, would essentially put a ring on it after months of will-they-or-won’t-they drama, as the two sides prepared to negotiate for the 53-year-old stadium. Opinions diverge as to whether the proposal is good for everyone involved, but those who want to share theirs will have to speak up soon, with the council expected to vote on the land sale portion of the deal Dec. 20. So how are people evaluating a possible deal that’s worth millions to Anaheim taxpayers and hard to put a price on for Angels baseball fans? ‘A home run’ Anaheim Council members Lucille Kring and Trevor O’Neil said they think the proposal is fair and, importantly, gets the city out of the stadium business. When you’re the landlord, “You’re the one who fixes the toilets and you’re the one that does everything, and when it’s vacant you’re the one that takes the loss,” Kring said. Anaheim officials have said the stadium needs an estimated $150 million in repairs and upgrades, and the current lease requires the city to pay six figures annually for maintenance. If the deal goes through, Kring said, “The residents, the taxpayers do not pay one single dime.” Besides the lump sum from the land sale, the city will get ongoing revenue from property and sales taxes as the land around the stadium is developed with homes, restaurants and shops, and other businesses, O’Neil said – and all that money can help pay for police service, parks and other things residents want and expect. “Everything that I hear from people in the community is all about keeping baseball in Anaheim, and we’ve accomplished that,” O’Neil said. “It’s a home run as far as I’m concerned.” Not so fast But the speed with which the deal was drafted and will be brought up for a binding vote leads Councilman Jose Moreno to conclude it’s being done “in the dark of night under a cloud of secrecy.” (Jose Moreno and Arte Moreno are not related.) Moreno has waged a months-long and largely unsuccessful campaign to open the negotiation process more to the public: the council majority declined to release the appraisal before a potential agreement was reached, and on Tuesday, Dec. 3, it wouldn’t agree to hold a public workshop on the draft deal at its regular Dec. 17 meeting, three days before the first key vote. (Moreno said he’ll hold his own community meeting.) Paul Kott, who owns a local real estate business, acknowledged he doesn’t know all the details but questioned the appraised land value – which ranges from $225 million to $475 million – and the price Anaheim seems willing to accept. The city deal would work out to $2.1 million an acre, but Kott said properties in or near the Platinum Triangle area where the stadium sits have gone for more than twice that. “I would say that those values (in the appraisal) are way too low based on what properties in that area are selling for recently,” he said. Add in that the final price tag on the prime developable acreage will likely be reduced to compensate the buyer for land-using benefits the city is requesting – extra park space and affordable homes – and Moreno considers the $325 million offer “laughable.” How does it compare? It’s unusual but not unique for Major League Baseball teams (or their wealthy owners) to own their own parks, said ballparkdigest.com publisher Kevin Reichard, noting that about eight teams – including the Dodgers – are their own landlord. Anaheim’s proposed deal seems in line with how other cities have helped spur money-making development around their stadiums, he said, and it avoids often-criticized taxpayer subsidies. “This is definitely a big-picture deal for both Anaheim and the Angels,” Reichard said. “By and large, these sports entertainment districts have proven to be pretty successful.” From a taxpayer’s perspective, the deal could certainly be worse, said Neil deMause, coauthor of “Field of Schemes,” a book about public financing of sports venues. He noted a 2013 draft agreement that might have let Arte Moreno develop the parking lot land under a long-term lease for $1 a year; city officials have said it was simply a discussion starter. But the new proposal’s unknowns – such as how much the city’s asks for the community will cost – make it hard to evaluate, deMause said. “I’m concerned that whenever you get something done in a rush like this, it’s a recipe for a bad deal.” Related links Angels agree to stay in Anaheim through 2050, stadium to be sold for $325 million Angel Stadium talks: What constitutes a ‘fair’ lease deal for Anaheim? Stadium maintenance, debt eat into Anaheim’s revenue from hosting Angels baseball After second meeting with Angels over stadium lease, mayor says ‘it’s clear’ they share same goals For the Angels, the proposed stadium sale would certainly help achieve a key objective, which team spokeswoman Marie Garvey described as “being able to control our destiny and create a great fan experience.” And about those fans? Much of the social media reaction expressed relief or satisfaction that the Angels’ future seems settled – before posters turned to questions of the team name or how to improve its record. “If I’m a fan, I’m just tickled pink that the two scenarios right now are the team staying in a renovated ballpark or the team playing in a new ballpark” on the same site, Reichard said. (Angels officials said they’re looking at all options for the stadium.) But he cautioned fans not to get too excited yet – big real estate and development projects often take longer than expected. View the full article
  5. The Angels, like millions of us here, have always been renters. At birth, they rented Dodger Stadium from the Dodgers. Since 1966, they rented Angel Stadium from the city of Anaheim. Now, on the verge of their 60th year of existence, the Angels will finally own their own home. It’s an authentic Southern California story. Under a monumental proposal announced Wednesday, the stadium and the 153 acres of land around it would be purchased by SRB Management, LLC, of which Angels owner Arte Moreno is a partner. The proposed agreement would keep the Angels in Anaheim until at least 2050. It must be formally ratified by the Anaheim City Council on Dec. 20 to take effect. The devil is always in the details. We can’t make a full assessment of those details until they’re codified by the city. But the two sides agreed enough on the basics to announce them Wednesday, as first reported by colleague Alicia Robinson. Optional extensions allow the Angels to play in Anaheim until 2065. Affordable housing and parkland would be part of the site development. SRB Management can cast its imagination upon most of the area between State College Blvd. on the west, Katella Ave. and the Amtrak/Metrolink rail lines on the north, the Santa Ana River on the east, and Orangewood Ave. on the south. It might imagine a new ballpark someday. The best part of this proposal? The $325 million going to the City of Anaheim would benefit residents who have never watched a baseball game and never will. Anaheim mayor Harry Sidhu, who campaigned on a promise to fight to retain the Angels, touted the ancillary revenue that comes from having a Major League Baseball team in town. Wednesday, the city of Anaheim estimated those tax revenues would net $7 million annually. Now this amounts to a bonus – not a means for justifying this deal to all of Anaheim’s 358,000-plus residents. Coincidentally, the proposal fell on the same day that St. Petersburg (Fla.) mayor Rick Kriseman made an announcement of his own. The Tampa Bay Rays had been contemplating a “shared season” agreement with Montreal, Canada. The particulars of splitting 81 home games between two cities in two countries were always difficult to grasp. The net effect would have been a major loss for St. Petersburg, which has long needed to replace the light-industrial warehouse known as Tropicana Field. Kriseman announced that any two-city arrangement will not happen before 2028, if it takes effect at all. He also said Rays officials declined an offer to explore full-time stadium locations throughout the Tampa Bay region, including Hillsborough County and the city of Tampa. This is emblematic of the kind of impermanent, incremental “progress” that hovered like a dark cloud above the Angels’ fate for years. In St. Petersburg, the Rays’ existence is steeped in nonsense. They occupy the second-largest city in their market. The Tropicana site is separated by several miles from the Tampa Bay waterfront, which is several miles removed (by boat or by car) from Tampa, the largest city in the region. By not exploring full-time stadium locations elsewhere in Hillsborough County (which includes Tampa but not St. Petersburg), the Rays invite more questions than answers. The big question: if the best place for a ballpark isn’t located closest to where most fans in the region live, where is it? So it went in Anaheim. In 2013, city officials failed to re-negotiate the stadium lease with the Angels. Plans for the team to refurbish its stadium in exchange for developing and profiting off the surrounding land were dashed. Moreno then explored the possibility of moving the team to Tustin. Against Moreno’s wishes, former Anaheim Mayor Tom Tait negotiated with developers who envisioned apartments, offices and a hotel towering over the American League’s second-oldest ballpark. Those development plans were never formalized. Still, the Angels opted out of their stadium lease in Oct. 2018, allowing them to explore another move. Then in January, the City Council extended the deadline, but the Angels and Anaheim faced from a Dec. 31 deadline, by which the Angels would have to give the city a year’s notice if they planned to quit the current lease early. Related Articles Angels acquire Dylan Bundy from Baltimore Orioles for 4 minor league pitchers Angels agree to stay in Anaheim through 2050, stadium to be sold for $325 million Angels non-tender catcher Kevan Smith MLB’s era of ‘load management’ is just getting started Angels’ Shohei Ohtani cleared to begin throwing off a mound It wasn’t just fans who felt moved by these clouds of impermanence. The mayor of Long Beach, Robert Garcia, approached the Angels about building a park on an undeveloped waterfront site near his city’s convention center. This move never passed the basic geography test. But if basic geography matters so little in Tampa, or in Montreal, or in Oakland, who’s to say it would carry the day in Southern California? The site that always made the most sense was the same one the city of Anaheim purchased from three farmers in 1964. Now – or at least soon – the Angels will sign a contract that formalizes what fans intuited all along. View the full article
  6. The Angels filled one of the holes in their starting rotation by acquiring right-hander Dylan Bundy from the Baltimore Orioles on Wednesday, a source confirmed. The Angels sent four minor-league pitchers to the Orioles, including right-hander Kyle Bradish, who was ranked the Angels’ No. 21 prospect by MLB Pipeline. None of the other three pitchers – right-handers Isaac Mattson, Kyle Brnovich and Zach Peek – were ranked in the top 30. Bundy, 27, was considered one of the top prospects in baseball for a few years after being selected fourth overall in the 2011 draft. He’s never quite lived up to that in his time with the Orioles. Bundy has a career 4.67 ERA, including a 4.79 mark in 2019. He has been durable lately, though, starting 89 games over the past three seasons. Bundy started 30 games last season, striking out 162 in 161 2/3 innings. The Angels did not have any pitcher make more than 18 starts, and Trevor Cahill led the team with 102-1/3 innings. The Angels have shown a preference for pitchers with high spin rates, and Bundy fits that criteria. His fastball spin was in the 86th percentile in the majors each of the past two seasons. General manager Billy Eppler said last month that the Angels’ preference was to acquire two starting pitchers. Their rotation currently includes Andrew Heaney, Griffin Canning and Shohei Ohtani, who is in the final stages of his rehab from Tommy John surgery. They also have Jaime Barría, José Suarez, Patrick Sandoval and Dillon Peters to compete for starts at the back of the rotation or as spot starters. Certainly, the Angels will need to sign at least one upper-tier starting pitcher if they hope to be considered contenders in 2020. Related Articles Angels agree to stay in Anaheim through 2050, stadium to be sold for $325 million Angels non-tender catcher Kevan Smith MLB’s era of ‘load management’ is just getting started Angels’ Shohei Ohtani cleared to begin throwing off a mound After second meeting with Angels over stadium lease, mayor says ‘it’s clear’ they share same goals They have been widely connected to Gerrit Cole. The top free-agent pitcher, Cole is an Orange County native. The Angels have already had at least one meeting with Cole and his agent, Scott Boras, according to a source. Boras also said last month that he had had lunch with Angels owner Arte Moreno. Bundy is projected to make $5.7 million in arbitration in 2020, which would leave plenty of payroll space for the Angels to add a pitcher of Cole’s caliber. If they miss out on Cole, they could make a run at Stephen Strasburg, Madison Bumgarner or Hyun-Jin Ryu. Zack Wheeler, another top starter who had been connected to the Angels, agreed Wednesday to a deal with the Philadelphia Phillies for $118 million over five years, according to multiple reports. More to come on this story. View the full article
  7. Anaheim’s hometown baseball team would continue playing in Angel Stadium for another 30 years, and the city would sell the stadium and 133 acres around it to a business partnership including team owner Arte Moreno for about $325 million, under the proposed outline of a deal that Anaheim City Council members were briefed on Tuesday, Dec. 3. Negotiating teams for the city and the Angels reached agreement on key deal points after meeting just three times in November, although both sides spent months preparing for talks. The sale proposed in the three-part deal is a significant departure from the status quo: the city built the stadium in 1966 and has at times faced criticism over what some say are generous lease terms for a reportedly profitable baseball team and its billionaire owner. “For every fan who told us to keep the Angels, this proposal would do exactly that,” Mayor Harry Sidhu said in a statement. “This proposal reflects what we’ve heard from the community – keep the Angels, a fair land price, money for neighborhoods, ongoing revenue, affordable housing, parks and jobs for Anaheim.” Any deal was expected to hinge on the sale or lease and development of property around the stadium, and the land still likely will be developed with apartments and condos, restaurants, hotels and entertainment businesses – but the city now will make money from increases in property and sales taxes rather than getting a direct cut of stadium or development revenue. The draft agreement also is expected to provide other specified community benefits, but those details are still being worked out, city spokesman Mike Lyster said. The council is expected to vote on the land sale portion of the deal at a special meeting Dec. 20, with a development agreement and community benefit provisions to follow in the spring. The purchaser, SRB Management LLC (which includes Moreno and other undisclosed partners), would need city approval of development plans for the property – those are expected to emerge in the next few years. Angels officials are still considering whether to renovate the stadium or build a new one, team spokeswoman Marie Garvey said. They’ve hired HKS Architects – which designed Minneapolis’ recently opened NFL stadium and is working on a new ballpark for the Texas Rangers – to explore their options. “We appreciate the mayor’s leadership in working to keep the Angels here in Anaheim, which has been our home for over 50 years,” Moreno said in a statement. “Today is the first step in enabling us to invest in our future by building a winning team and delivering a high-quality fan experience.” The team’s existing lease was drafted in 1996, when the Walt Disney Co. owned the Angels, and it lasts through 2029, with optional extensions through 2038. Earlier attempts to negotiate a new deal between 2013 and 2016 failed. In fall 2018, the Angels announced they’d be opting out of the stadium lease this year. That sent city leaders scrambling to arrange fresh talks with the goal of keeping the team. But after the newly elected Sidhu got the council in January to reinstate the old lease and extend the opt-out window, there was little visible progress for months. While they’re still working out some details of a deal that will last decades, city information describes provisions including: Commitment of the team to play in Anaheim through 2050, with optional extensions adding up to 15 more years. Sale of 153 acres, including parking lots and the 45,483-seat stadium, to SRB Management for $325 million. Community benefits including affordable housing, parkland in addition to what’s already required of new developments, and a local hire agreement for construction; the housing and parks would be given a dollar value that would be subtracted from the land’s selling price. As the stadium’s owner, Moreno’s partnership would be required to provide parking at the current level of 12,500 spaces, which will likely require building a costly parking garage as development moves forward; the team also would be solely responsible for either making millions in stadium repairs or building a new venue. Other impacts to the city’s bottom line, such as canceling its annual stadium maintenance fund payment of about $700,000; Anaheim would still be on the hook to pay about $523,000 in debt left over from an ill-fated addition of exhibit space in the late 1980s. The news of a deal puts to rest the suggestion the team might move to Long Beach, where city leaders months ago had sought to woo the Angels to a proposed waterfront stadium. It also eases some pressure both sides faced from a Dec. 31 deadline, by which the Angels would have to give the city a year’s notice if they planned to quit the current lease early. City leaders have touted the ancillary revenue, such as spending at restaurants and shops, that come from having a resident Major League Baseball team that reportedly sells more than 3 million tickets a season. But with debt payments and maintenance obligations eating into any direct revenue, Anaheim has made little from the stadium, netting only about $626,000 in total over the last two decades. City leaders have yet to discuss how the millions from selling the stadium would be spent, but an ongoing effort led by a nonprofit connected to the Anaheim Chamber of Commerce has been surveying residents on the needs in their neighborhoods. Related links Angel Stadium talks: What constitutes a ‘fair’ lease deal for Anaheim? Stadium maintenance, debt eat into Anaheim’s revenue from hosting Angels baseball After second meeting with Angels over stadium lease, mayor says ‘it’s clear’ they share same goals Anaheim councilman raises questions, sets out priorities for potential Angels lease View the full article
  8. By Robert Cunningham, Angelswin.com Senior Writer For the Angels starting rotation, 2019 was not a kind year. Unfortunately, the Halos starters were last out of all 30 MLB teams in total Wins Above Replacement (WAR) with a measly 3.3 WAR. Other peripheral indicators support the poor performance. For reference, the Nationals led all of baseball with a total 21.4 WAR. So what do the Angels do to fix this situation? For reference, the table below shows a leader board of qualified starters, sorted by Wins Above Replacement on a per G (WAR/G) basis, over the last three seasons: If Moreno is serious about increasing payroll and making this team more competitive, as the hiring of Joe Maddon suggests and by his very own words, the Angels will need to invest a majority of their off-season payroll into starting pitching. It is the general consensus of the baseball community that the Angels will be in, heavily, on free agent ace Gerrit Cole or possibly Stephen Strasburg. Not only is Gerrit the agreed-upon available top starter, he throws 95+ mph heat, has an arsenal of wicked off-speed pitches, and took his team deep into the post-season this year. Strasburg helped carry his Nationals to a World Championship over Cole's Astros. Both are high-caliber options. Cole will cost a lot of money, likely something on the order of 30M+ average annual value (AAV) and $230M+ in total salary commitment over, probably, a 7-8 year deal. Strasburg will probably require a 5-6 year, $150M-$180M ($30M AAV) deal to secure his services. Either of these outlays will result in the Angels exceeding last years starting payroll number, thus the clear need for Arte to open the wallet if the team truly wants to contend in 2020. In the Finances article of the Primer Series we argued for a payroll increase to make significant improvements. The current starting point is approximately $162M for 2020 Club Payroll and $151M in Actual Club Payroll (AAV) and, in order to make big moves with Simmons and Cozart still on the books, Moreno will be forced to approach or, more remotely, exceed the Competitive Balance Tax (CBT) threshold barring an unexpected trade of Andrelton or Zack. Thus, if the club can acquire one or more game-changing stars (and it should be stressed that Arte would only exceed the CBT threshold for a high-end player), the author believes Moreno could possibly approach or exceed the CBT threshold of $208M and potentially go as high as the 1st Surcharge threshold of $228M, where the penalty is minimal (20% tax on the difference between AAV and the threshold of $208M, so no more than a $4M surcharge tax fee for 2020). Again, to reemphasize, this would only happen if Arte allows it and the player or players in question are first-rate acquisitions, so this is a low probability outcome that should be discussed but not expected. As a large market team the Angels have not significantly played in the payroll clouds (Luxury Tax) before, so this would be a complete break from previous seasons despite the fact that doing so now, in the new era of Mike Trout, could pay dividends across the board, particularly with the available slate of quality free agents this year and a complete dearth of them in next years market. In the end, though, Moreno has consistently authorized high payrolls but, rather than believing in the dream scenario, Angels fans should temper their expectations that the Opening Day payroll will exceed $208M and in all probability will be no more than $190M-$195M, give or take. It is the latter we will focus more on in this article and the remainder of the Primer Series. So, as MLBTradeRumors.com discussed, the Angels are likely to acquire a free agent front-of-the-rotation starter such as the aforementioned Gerrit Cole or Stephen Strasburg. For the purposes of this article, the author is going to assume that the Angels acquire one of them at $35M or $30M Average Annual Value (AAV) for Cole and Strasburg, respectively. Assuming a back-loaded contract ($20M-$25M in 2020), this puts the Angels 2020 Club Payroll and Actual Club Payroll (AAV) at $182M-$187M and $181M-$186M AAV respectively, without any other transactions taking place to start 2020. Grabbing a top-shelf starter to compliment Ohtani and lead this rotation is a must-have in the author's opinion. A 1-2 punch at the top will help win more games and increase overall team confidence that, on any given start, the Top 2 starters will get the job done. Based on previous seasons, the Angels would be really smart to create solid depth here. Bringing in 2-3 starters from free agency and/or trade will allow Eppler and Maddon to build not only a strong rotation but also a very deep pitching bench. Depth has been a crippling issue over the last handful of years and it is high time the Angels address it directly with the application of a payroll increase and/or creative trades to add more at the top and in the middle of the rotation and supplement and perhaps even trade (no more than 1-2 starters) off of the back-end supply they currently have. Andrew Heaney, coming off a sterling peripherals season (28.9% K% rate, which is approaching elite-level), will make a fine #3 type behind a Top 2 set-up. Adding another free agent or trade acquisition such as Zack Wheeler, Madison Bumgarner, Cole Hamels, Hyun-Jin Ryu, Jon Gray, Dylan Bundy, or Robbie Ray, would create a very competitive Top 4 and the Angels could easily round out that starting five with an in-house candidate such as Griffin Canning, Jaime Barria, Jose Suarez, or Patrick Sandoval for example. Rumors have placed Wheeler's projected salary at 5 years, $100M ($20M AAV). This seems high because when you look at a recent comparable, Nathan Eovaldi, Zack is a year older and enters his free agent year with a 3.96 ERA versus Nathan's walk-year where he had a more pristine 3.33 ERA and signed a 4-year, $68M ($17M AAV) contract. ERA certainly isn't an insightful tool but results matter and Wheeler's fatigue near the end of the season may add a touch of doubt to his market. However, in terms of velocity, Wheeler throws about as hard as Cole and Nathan and is only about one year older, albeit with his Tommy John Surgery (2015) in the rear-view mirror. Gerrit is likely to pull in a 7-year deal, so would teams be willing to throw in a 6th year for Zack to bring the offer to nine figures? Seems really unlikely but there is a broad market for his services. All that being said, Eovaldi may have taken a slight discount to go to the Red Sox, and this market appears to be highly competitive, but it appears that Wheeler will get that fifth, or maybe even sixth, year and climb to $100M or more. The author expects Zack to pull in a 5-year deal worth anywhere from $90M-$100M ($18M-$20M AAV) which may, if Arte spends above the tax threshold, be a plausible acquisition behind Cole/Strasburg. If a sixth year is attached, it could possibly inch over $100M (think 6 years, $102M, $17M AAV for example). Realistically, the other mid-tier free agent starters like Bumgarner, Ryu, and Hamels will probably command contracts with an AAV range of $15M-$18M per year, give or take. Including Wheeler, all four of them may be priced out of the Angels budget simply because a Cole or Strasburg acquisition automatically puts the Angels, as mentioned above, in the $181M-$187M range. Adding one of the above, would vault next year's payroll into the $195M-$210M realm and Moreno may not be willing to stomach the ticket price. It may be more practical for the Angels to snag one of Cole or Strasburg and then trade for a lower-salaried front or mid-tier starter and then shop in the lower-end of free agency or trade for a third back-end piece. If the Angels go this route, available trade targets might include names like Jon Gray, Jake Odorizzi (in trade, now that he accepted the Qualifying Offer, although this is unlikely), Dylan Bundy, Jose Quintana, Danny Duffy, Jose Urena, Matthew Boyd, Daniel Norris, Jakob Junis, Robbie Ray, Jeff Samardzija, Chris Archer, and Joe Musgrove, among many others. On the free agency side, names like Homer Bailey (93 mph FB), Andrew Cashner (94 mph FB), Rich Hill (Approximate 21% K%-BB% rate over last three years on limited innings pitched each of those seasons), Dallas Keuchel (Career 58.9% GB% rate), Matt Moore (touched 94 mph in 10 IP before knee surgery cut his 2019 season short), Martin Perez (50% GB% rate and 94 mph FB), Michael Pineda (18.7% K%-BB% rate but serving Performance-Enhancing Drug Suspension to start the 2020 season), Tanner Roark (14.8% K%-BB% rate), Michael Wacha (93 mph FB), Alex Wood (Career 49% GB% rate), Gabriel Ynoa (93.5 mph FB), and/or Brett Anderson (56.8% GB% rate) might have some level of appeal, particularly in terms of salary fit. So, as an example, say the Angels sign one of Gerrit Cole or Stephen Strasburg and then trade for a lower-salaried, controllable starter like Jon Gray or Dylan Bundy (each will make approximately $5.5M-$6M in arbitration for 2020) and then sign someone like Homer Bailey, Matt Moore, Rich Hill, or Alex Wood in the $5M-$10M range on a one to three year deal. This would push 2020 Club Payroll and Actual Club Payroll up toward the $200M mark which is high but still below the CBT threshold of $208M. The Angels would still have room for one or two low-level moves (such as an inexpensive catcher for example) but this would allow the team to spend significantly (as Moreno indicated was possible) while still sliding under the Luxury Tax at least up until the Trade Deadline where more information will be available to determine if the Angels should go further in improving the 2020 squad for a playoff push (which may then result in an overage over the CBT threshold). Rebuilding the rotation this off-season, by acquiring an ace, will set the stage for a more stable starting five, along with corresponding quality depth, for a long time to come. Strategically it will allow the Halos to enter a new window of contention immediately. Prioritizing starting pitcher additions for 2020 and beyond is the greatest need Eppler must address and, in fact, may be the only area he seriously deals with based on how far Moreno extends the payroll leash. Likely Outcome: Angels will sign one of Cole or Strasburg and then trade for a mid-tier type such as Gray, Bundy, Ray, or Boyd. From there they may sign a third starter such as Moore, Pineda, or Bailey but that will be dependent on payroll space. If three starters are acquired, this will allow the Angels to trade off one, or maybe two, of their back-end starters in trade with the likely candidates being Barria, Sandoval, or Suarez. The remainder of those candidates, not traded, would line up with the rest (Canning, Madero, Peters, et. al.) as quality rotation depth in the Minors and that depth does not even consider high Minor League players not on the 40-man roster like Chris Rodriguez, for instance. Hypothetically, if the Angels miss out on one of the Big 2, they can go to the backup plan of signing two of the remaining Tier 2 starters such as Wheeler, Bumgarner, Hamels, or Ryu and still trade for a mid-tier type as mentioned above. That won't be quite as strong but it will still improve the rotation considerably. Author's Choice: Gerrit Cole is a must have signing from my perspective. Nothing is promised in the off-season but Cole strikes me as a similar comparable to Scherzer and speculatively it feels like Gerrit will provide a lot of value over his next contract. Additionally, if Moreno extends the payroll leash, signing Zack Wheeler would be a huge plus, too. Beyond that, trading for one of Jon Gray, Matt Boyd and Robbie Ray would be a solid acquisition. Signing Matt Moore has some dangers but his velocity was great before his injury so that is a gamble I would like to see the Angels take but Pineda, Hill, or Bailey (in that order) would be perfectly fine outcomes as a third pickup, if wanted and/or needed. Assuming the Angels acquire three starters as speculated at, above, I would like to see a trade executed involving one (or possibly two) of Jaime Barria, Jose Suarez, or Patrick Sandoval (in that order, probably) as shown in the two independent examples below: Angels send MIF Zack Cozart, SP Jaime Barria, 3B/1B Matt Thaiss, 2B/OF Jahmai Jones, OF Orlando Martinez, and OF D'Shawn Knowles to the Orioles in exchange for 1B/COF Trey Mancini and LHR Tanner Scott Why? The Orioles are in a full rebuild and need to hoard prospects and players with multiple years of team control. By taking on all of Cozart's 2020 salary they get not only the veteran shortstop they are looking for, they also obtain a young starting pitcher in Barria, to add to their rotation with 5 years of team control. In addition they get Thaiss who can play the infield corners, a high quality prospect in Jones, and two upside OF prospects in Knowles and Martinez. Buying prospects through a salary dump is rare, but not unprecedented, as seen here and here. For the Angels, in this particular season with the situation our payroll is in, the ability to shave Zack's salary, based on his negative surplus value, would be a huge help in navigating this off-season, if Eppler can manage it. Additionally, a move like this, would give the Halos a tested, and possible breakout, bat in Mancini (his 2019 peripherals point to significant improvement) who can play first base and the corner outfield positions in a pinch for at least 2020 and possibly the succeeding two seasons based on how high his arbitration cost rises. Acquiring Trey lowers total team production risk, by allowing Walsh to develop further (and act as quality depth at 1B) in the Minors, while adding another power option to the lineup behind Trout. Finally it would also give the Angels five controllable seasons of a powerful lefty bullpen arm in Scott who would improve the bullpen's potential to close out games in the later innings of a game. Angels trade LHP Jose Suarez, OF Trent Deveaux, and RHP Cooper Criswell in exchange for LF/1B Kyle Schwarber Why? The Cubs reportedly need to trim payroll and Schwarber represents a potential $8M savings that can be replaced internally by Bryant or Happ for example. Certainly Chicago would miss his bat in the lineup but by all accounts cutting dollars is important for them this off-season. It allows the Cubs to bring in one Major League ready young, controllable left-handed starter, a prospect outfielder with upside and another right-handed pitching prospect, all while shaving the aforementioned salary and giving up the final two years of arbitration control over Kyle. For the Angels it would bring in a left-handed power bat (more so versus RHP) they can place at 1B and serve as a depth option for Upton in LF. Assuming Schwarber does well they could retain him for one more season in 2021 or potentially extend him if that is Eppler's desire. Conclusion: The Angels have no choice but to take two routes here in the author's opinion - Sign or trade for two starters, one of which is an ace-level pitcher like Cole and Strasburg, with the other a mid-tier type like Gray, Ray, or Boyd, or Sign or trade for three starters, two of which are upper (like Cole or Strasburg) or mid-tier (like Wheeler, Archer, Bumgarner, Gray, Ray, or Ryu) types and one additional mid-tier or lower-tier guy. In the first scenario the Halos can get by with a rotation of, for example, Strasburg, Ohtani, Heaney, Boyd, and Canning. The second scenario might be a rotation of Ohtani, Wheeler, Heaney, Ray, and Pineda, which isn't as strong at the former but is still a greatly improved starting five. Both options would improve bench depth. As fans we work with really imperfect information regarding the free agent and trade markets. If Eppler receives real interest in some of his back-end starters (Barria, Sandoval, Suarez, et. al.) the Angels would probably best be served by acquiring three starters and then trading one off for other areas of need, otherwise two rotation pieces, one an ace, is the most likely path. The former, spending more for three starters, will allow the Angels to more effectively open additional doors to address other concerns and will build natural depth all around the diamond (through the aforementioned trades). Again everything will rest on how much of the proverbial yacht fuel Moreno is willing to sacrifice in pursuit of these targets. If he does not commit to significant spending, Arte may find himself setting sail on the 2020 season rather than pulling into the playoffs port for the first time in a long while. If the rumors of Texas' interest in Anthony Rendon are true, the A.L. West is about to get really competitive across the board, so the Angels need to position themselves as a contender in the Division by taking an aggressive posture now. This off-season all eyes are on the moves Eppler makes for the starting rotation, as it is the crux of our success in 2020. View the full article
  9. Hello Halos61,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  10. Hello Condor1984,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  11. The Angels non-tendered catcher Kevan Smith, leaving them likely in the market for another catcher this winter. The only two catchers left on the 40-man roster are Max Stassi, who might not be ready for Opening Day after hip surgery, and Anthony Bemboom. The Angels tendered their remaining eight arbitration-eligible players: pitchers Andrew Heaney, Hansel Robles, Cam Bedrosian and Noé Ramírez, infielder Tommy La Stella, outfielder Brian Goodwin. Smith was projected to make about $1.3 million in 2020. The 31-year-old hit .251 with five homers and a .710 OPS in 191 at-bats last year. He missed time with a concussion and a hand injury. The list of available free agent catchers includes Robinson Chirinos, Jason Castro and Martín Maldonado. Maldonado, a former Angel, could be an attractive target as part of the Angels’ plan to lure free agent Gerrit Cole. Maldonado was Cole’s personal catcher during their two months together with the Houston Astros. Related Articles MLB’s era of ‘load management’ is just getting started Angels’ Shohei Ohtani cleared to begin throwing off a mound After second meeting with Angels over stadium lease, mayor says ‘it’s clear’ they share same goals Angels add Jahmai Jones, Hector Yan to 40-man roster Alexander: Mike Trout, Cody Bellinger help SoCal corner the market on MVPs View the full article
  12. By Robert Cunningham, Angelswin.com Senior Writer To classify this off-season as the most important one in Eppler's career, to-date, is not an understatement. Moreno has not yet publicly extended Billy's contract, which means 2020 is the last year under his current deal and he could be looking for a new position in the coming months if the off-season does not go as planned and/or the Angels get off to a terrible start in the upcoming season. On top of that Arte has expressed a clear need for this team to push itself into a new window of contention after years of languishing in mediocrity in the A.L. West standings. Moreno wants to see action (fans in the seats too) and is helping Eppler's situation by promising to increase team payroll for 2020 and the acquisition of an experienced skipper in Joe Maddon (Billy might dispute the latter but the author's gut feeling is that Arte made the right move here). So in order to understand the areas that need improvement (if they are not clear already) let us take a look at how the starting rotation, bullpen, defense, and position players (against both left and right handed pitching) fared in 2019: 2019 Team Starting Rotation Wins Above Replacement (WAR) So right off the bat (pardon the pun), it is clear that the starting rotation needs significant improvement, as the Angels ranked dead last in total WAR production as a group. Certainly the tragic passing of Tyler Skaggs contributed to the issue but overall the team failed to pitch meaningful innings and it showed in the end-of-year results. Fixing this issue will be Eppler's #1 priority this off-season without a doubt. 2019 Team Bullpen WAR Here the Angels were more middle-of-the-pack in overall performance. In spite of the fact that relief pitching is so volatile by nature, Eppler has consistently done well in establishing competent bullpens during his tenure as General Manager of the Angels. Fortunately the Angels will be retaining some of their key pieces from 2019 and Keynan Middleton should return full-time in 2020 which should help bolster the unit as a whole. The Angels front office has also consistently performed well in identifying inexpensive bullpen acquisitions via waiver and other means so it is likely that Eppler's team will continue to comb the wire, Rule 5 Draft opportunities, and even add-on's via trade that can help build a strong relief unit next season without expending significant resources to do so. 2019 Team Defense Using FanGraphs 'Def' Here the Angels did well above average, ranking 7th out of all 30 Major League clubs according to FanGraphs 'Def' rating. Ultimate Zone Rating per 150 innings (UZR/150) also supports the notion that the Halos were a strong defensive unit. Billy has clearly stated in the past that team defense, particularly up-the-middle positions (C, SS, 2B, and CF), is the foundation of success for any team he builds and the above numbers reflect that philosophy. Of course there is always room for improvement so it would not be surprising to see Eppler continue to tweak the roster and put good defensive players in a position to provide maximum on-field value, including any potential new acquisitions. 2019 Team Batting vs. Left-Handed Pitching (LHP) Against LHP, the Angels struggled a bit throughout the season, ranking 19th overall out of all 30 Major League teams with a Weighted Runs Created Plus (wRC+) of 98. Of course Trout led the charge, followed by names like Smith, Simmons, Goodwin, Pujols, and Ohtani who all performed well. This will almost certainly be an area that Eppler will try to improve upon but it is unlikely to be an area that he expends significant team resources on, because only about 30% of the teams at-bat's are against lefties during most seasons. The addition of another bat or two that can pummel lefties would be nice, but not a must have, so there will probably be some marginal refinement during the off-season to address this need and could simply involve the addition of one or two farm assets (e.g. Ward, Adell, et. al.). 2019 Team Batting vs. Right-Handed Pitching (RHP) Here the Halos were slightly above average, ranked 12th out of all 30 Major League teams with a wRC+ of 99. Of course, once again, Trout dominated against RHP (188 wRC+) and was distantly followed by La Stella, Ohtani, Upton, Calhoun, Goodwin, and Fletcher. Improvement here will be more important than against LHP so the expectation would be that the Angels will try to replace the loss of Calhoun's bat either directly at his position in RF or by filling another spot around the diamond with a player that can handle RHP. Eppler will probably not expend a large amount of resources doing this unless he pursues a big bat at a position of need in free agency such as a 1B/LF/RF type like Castellanos, one of the Big 2 at the hot corner (Rendon or Donaldson), or even a trade opportunity like Schwarber, Bell, or Turner, for example. So expect Billy, barring the mystical Moreno unicorn payroll increase, to use 40-man roster players, farm resources, or lower-level signings to improve in this area. Observations So it is crystal clear that the starting rotation is where Eppler needs to focus most of his off-season attention and resources (this is not new news to most). Building a strong starting five plus bench depth is sorely needed and it will not be a successful off-season if the Angels do not significantly improve in this area through the acquisition of at least 2-3 quality starters with at least one being a top-of-the-rotation type ace. Beyond the rotation our offense will need to improve, too, but likely in a less resource intensive manner. By declining Kole's option year, the Halos have set the stage for Brian Goodwin to man right field until the May/June time frame when the Angels gain the extra year of control over young Jo Adell and he gets called up to take over the position (likely full-time). That alone should provide some needed firepower, although fans should temper their expectations as Jo has some swing and miss in his game right now that will be tested by opposing teams in his first year in Anaheim. All that being said, Adell is a really exciting five-tool prospect, full of potential, that can make a long-term impact in Anaheim. So, based on where the Angels put David Fletcher, 2B or 3B may see a platoon set-up via a free agent signing or low-level trade for a proper partner to one of our internal candidates. For example if David mans the keystone, third base might wind up being a platoon of Tommy La Stella (who hits well against RHP) and Zack Cozart (good defense) or even a free agent or trade acquisition that can crush LHP. Alternatively if Fletcher mans the hot corner, a platoon of Luis Rengifo (good against righties) and Cozart or another outside candidate that can manage lefties might be the best choice. Of course, if Eppler has more payroll space than currently advertised, the hot corner could be improved even more than described above, particularly because the market lacks a quantity of good free agency and trade choices over the next few years. Catcher may be a position where Eppler and the front office value defense so much that they purposely punt on offensive needs to get the best defensive catching tandem they can muster. Stassi grades out very well on defense so he seems a likely piece for next season but finding the right partner may be a challenge if the team does not apply the resources for a top-tier target in free agency (Grandal and Zunino were good examples before they signed with the White Sox and Rays, respectively) or trade (the latter seems more plausible with the activity in the catching market this off-season). Also, the Angels could pick up a left-handed bat for first base if they do not feel that Jared Walsh or Matt Thaiss can provide the needed, immediate, production. Free agency has some interesting names that could be had on the cheap or, if the Angels want to expend more resources, the trade market has options too. Both of our internal candidates have potential but this may be too much risk for the front office to take in such a critical off-season so keep an eye out for what happens at that spot. The bullpen could use a touch of reinforcement (perhaps a good lefty?) but the current cast the front office has assembled has a lot of potential to repeat and even improve upon the 2019 results. Robles, Buttrey, Ramirez (Noe), Bedrosian, Cole, Pena, Anderson, Middleton, et. al., form the basis of a strong core unit that may only need some polish added through the addition of 1-2 more relievers prior to the end of Spring Training. Probably an area where Eppler, as is his tradition, will expend only minimal resources, if any. Finally, the only other position that we should probably discuss is shortstop. Simmons is entering his final year of control and it seems likely that Eppler will use this off-season to make a material decision about the future of the position. Extending Andrelton is certainly a possibility and would not be a shocker at all but there are a couple of options out on the trade market that could entice Billy to trade Simba rather than retain him for this year or even longer term through the aforementioned extension. Ultimately this is not a decision that Eppler can afford to wait on from a strategic point of view so it will be interesting to see what Billy does here for the future of the franchise. Ultimately Eppler will roster-build based on his available resources (payroll, MLB players, prospects, and International Bonus Pool money) but it is Moreno's budget guidance that will really factor into how dynamic our off-season will or will not be. This will likely fall into four general categories: Under $190M (2020 Club Payroll with Actual Club Payroll not to exceed $208M, most probable) Under $208M (Both 2020 Club Payroll and Actual Club Payroll, less probable) Under $228M (1st Surcharge Threshold, unlikely) Under $248M (2nd Surcharge Threshold, very unlikely) The first two options represent the more likely scenarios and do allow sufficient room to improve the team enough to make an impact in 2020. The latter two are much less likely unless Arte has decided to go all-in for the next two seasons (2020-2021), knowing that the team can sneak back under the Competitive Balance Tax (CBT) threshold in the 2021-2022 off-season once Pujols contract comes off of the books (not an impossibility). When you consider that Moreno has only exceeded the CBT threshold once, nearly 15 years ago, the odds of it happening seem remote. As much as this would be a great time to do it, particularly when you see such a barren free agent market next off-season, history shows that Arte has been very reluctant to cross that line, even by a smidge (to be fair though he has consistently supported high payrolls unlike some other owners). Realistically, he might do it now or consider it closer to the trade deadline if exceeding the CBT threshold, for the right player, would improve the teams odds of making the playoffs but that is the author's speculation and shouldn't be relied upon as part of our discussion. In the final article of the series we will do some payroll scheme examples for the four scenarios above to give you an idea of the limits and possibilities. So, now that we have gotten some of the pleasantries out of the way, lets dive into a position by position examination and discussion to see what plausible options the Angels have to consider when building next seasons squad as we continue to plunge into the 2020 Angelswin.com Primer Series! View the full article
  13. Hello Barb,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  14. By Robert Cunningham, Angelswin.com Senior Writer As the Angels enter the 2019-2020 off-season, Billy Eppler is faced with the daunting task of taking Moreno's proposed increase in team payroll and creating a contending club out of the available resource pool. Currently, the Angels 40-man roster stands at 40 players as of November 28th, 2019. In order to begin the discussion about available finances, the author has examined the Angels 40-man roster and assuming the Angels retain the current set of 40 players and use MLBTradeRumors.com's estimated arbitration salaries, 2020 Club Payroll will be approximately $162M and Actual Club Payroll (Average Annual Value (AAV) payroll) will be approximately $151M as seen below: A couple of notes regarding the table above: Injured List $$ indicates a nominal number for MLB players that spend time on the Injured List and is an educated guess based on information provided by the Orange County Register's Jeff Fletcher. Payouts refers to any and all money expended on players no longer on the 40-man roster. In this case the $1M number was Kole Calhoun's option year buyout. Subtract Non-Roster is simply the 14 players not on the 26-man roster making League-minimum salaries that do not count toward the total payroll numbers. In this case 14 x $600K = $8.4M Benefits refers to Player Benefit Costs and is an educated guess (also based on information provided by Jeff Fletcher) on how much every team pays toward that fund. Below is the relevant excerpt of the Collective Bargaining Agreement that shows how it is applied to the payroll calculation: To be clear this estimate is exactly that, an educated guess. The only difference between '2020 Club Payroll' and 'Actual Club Payroll' is that in the latter you are accounting for the multi-year guaranteed contracts (average annual value of them) and how close that places the team to the Competitive Balance Tax (CBT) threshold for that season (in this case $208M for 2020). So Eppler starts the season with approximately $147M in 2020 Club Payroll and $136M in Actual Club Payroll (AAV) and when you adjust for Player Benefits, non-roster players, Injury List (IL) payout estimates and Calhoun's $1M option buyout, the Angels start the season at $162M (2020 Club Payroll) and $151M (Actual Club Payroll). This means that, based on Moreno's own words about raising 2020 Club Payroll, the team probably has at least $25M+ to spend in free agency and trade and likely that number is closer $30M-$40, if not more. Fortunately, because of this, the Halos have more options this off-season in terms of money and resources (both MLB-ready players, farm prospects, and International Signing money) to address their needs and create better depth across the roster. If the Angels really are courting Gerrit Cole (and they should be), he will likely get the Angels close to their spending limit all by himself on a back loaded contract. In order to make other moves, Eppler will have to get creative in the trade market as well as executing savvy low-level free agent signings to fill in the rest of the roster. This may require Moreno to get awfully close to, or even exceed, the Luxury Tax threshold of $208M, although the team will likely stay under that number, barring a truly unexpected all-in over the next two seasons (a precise window they can escape by the way once Pujols contract expires after 2021). Expectations are high for Eppler to create a winner in his current, last year as General Manager so Angelswin.com members and fans should expect at least one large free agent signing with perhaps 1-3 lower-level pickups. In addition to that it will not be surprising to see 1-3 trades executed to bring in additional pitching and positional needs. All of this will be covered further as we dive deeper into the 2020 Angelswin.com Primer Series! View the full article
  15. By Robert Cunningham, Angelswin.com Senior Writer So I almost didn't write the series this year. A lot of things happened, one of which the company I worked for, Vector-Launch, unfortunately shut down in mid-August due to the loss of our primary financial backer, Sequoia. This was a real loss to me because that was the best damn job I ever had and likely will ever have the remainder of my career. It is rare that you find a position where you enjoy the work so much that you don't even feel like it is work, you have a supervisor that respects and mentors you, and you have fantastic relationships with virtually all of your coworkers to the point that they become family and you even hang out with them outside of work. Vector was all of that and it is a damn shame that it had to go. There are parallels to that situation with the 2019 Angels. The Halos, at the start of the season seemed locked in. Our new manager, Brad Ausmus, was at the helm and seemed to have a good grasp of how to manage the team and appeared to have the respect of the players. Most importantly the team seemed to gel well and the clubhouse atmosphere seemed loose and fun. However, as we are all aware, injuries, ineffectiveness, and a lack of leadership at the top ravaged the 2019 Angels team. Players like Matt Harvey and Cody Allen, larger ticket players Eppler signed on one-year deals in the off-season, failed to produce and were eventually cut. The Angels tragically lost Tyler Skaggs mid-season to a deadly concoction of opioids and alcohol. Justin Upton, Mike Trout, Shohei Ohtani, Luis Rengifo, and Tommy La Stella all hit the Injury List (IL) at various points in the season creating a discontinuity in the field and lineup that was reflected in the Angels very poor win-loss record at the end of the year. These losses certainly added up to a recipe for disaster in Anaheim that seems, on the surface, difficult to overcome in 2020 and proved fatal to Brad Ausmus' tenure. Like Vector-Launch, they had to close it down. So, once again, it will be up to Billy Eppler in what could be his last year as General Manager, and the front office staff to set a path for success this off-season if the Angels will have a real chance at post-season play. One very bright point is the signing of future Hall of Fame candidate Mike Trout to a career-long extension at the beginning of the 2019 season. The Angels now have the premier player in baseball locked up and can rest easy knowing that he is the centerpiece to build the remainder of the team around as they look to contend in 2020 and beyond. Some of these pieces are already here. Despite Justin Upton's poor offensive performance in 2019, he is still signed for three more seasons making him a likely complimentary piece in left field for next year. Andrelton Simmons will be entering his final year of control and, barring a trade, will man shortstop again in 2020 with the possibility of an extension contract in his future. Kole Calhoun turned out to be a luxury the Angels couldn't afford in an off-season where they need a lot of starting pitching but fortunately, the Angels have Brian Goodwin to fill their right field need to start the season. Other complimentary players like Zack Cozart (if healthy), David Fletcher, Luis Rengifo, Matt Thaiss, Taylor Ward, Jared Walsh, and Tommy La Stella should help fill one or more holes in the infield not called shortstop. Catcher may turn out to be a patchwork again manned by some combination of Max Stassi (who probably won't be ready to start the season), Anthony Bemboom, Kevan Smith, and perhaps one or more other, yet-to-be-acquired, backstops. Shohei Ohtani should be ready to pitch again, along with Andrew Heaney, giving the Angels a decent base to create a rotation with the likes of Griffin Canning, Jaime Barria, Patrick Sandoval, Jose Suarez, Dillon Peters, and possibly others like Felix Pena filling up the back-end of the starting five. However, it should be clearly noted that the free agent starting pitching market has some very attractive players that the Angels will almost certainly target to create a strong rotation for 2020. Our relief corps will probably contain names like Ty Buttrey, Hansel Robles, Noe Ramirez, Cam Bedrosian, Luke Bard, Justin Anderson, Keynan Middleton, Jake Jewell, and Taylor Cole among potential others. In fact this group may be enough to rely upon for the 2020 season, making it one potential area that the Angels need not worry about this off-season in terms of expending resources. The rebuilding process in the Angels Minor League system has actually been underway for some time now. Eppler has been steadily building it up and there are some notable names that have joined or are on the verge of joining Trout in Anaheim. Potential stars like Jo Adell and Brandon Marsh, along with contributing pieces like Luis Madero are making strides to join the big league club in 2020 or after. Adell in particular appears to be the closest to the Majors and is likely, based on Calhoun's option being declined, a call-up in the May/June time frame. Other potential contributors like Luis Pena (bullpen), Jahmai Jones (2B/OF), and Chris Rodriguez could accelerate fast if they have a productive start in 2020. The unexpected replacement of Ausmus with Joe Maddon and Moreno's recent comments that there will be an increase in payroll this off-season clearly points to a sea change and acceleration to push the Angels into a window of contention that many fans have been awaiting for a long time. Based on the groundwork laid to date, owner comments, and a largely new, but experienced, coaching staff, it seems highly probable that there will be at least one or more significant free agent signings and/or complimentary trades to help position the Angels to fight for a playoff spot in 2020. The Astros and A's still pose a significant threat in the Division but an improved Angels squad will make for a much more interesting race in the A.L. West. In terms of team needs, clearly the Angels need to add at least one top-of-the-rotation starter and likely an additional mid-tier type to create solid depth. Adding a high-quality defensive catcher, to compliment one of Stassi (likely), Smith (maybe), or Bemboom (unlikely), would be a nice add to receive all of those pitches from the revamped rotation. The infield will need to be reinforced, likely at the corners with third base a long-term strategic concern for Eppler. Right field will be open to competition with Jo Adell in the mix (and the future of the position) but likely only after the Angels retain the extra year of team control on him (thus the projected May/June call-up). Adding another reliever or two to the mix, even if they are waiver claims or Rule 5 picks, will add depth. The question will ultimately be how high will Moreno let Eppler spend? Is it a modest increase or something much more significant that would take us into Luxury Tax territory for the next two years? Will a poor free agent market in the 2020-2021 off-season drive spending now? What moves can be made in free agency and trade to strengthen the team? Can the team supplement from the Minors in key areas throughout the season to create the missing depth that recent Angels squads have lacked? All that and more in what is sure to be an active Angels off-season in the subsequent installments of the 2020 Angelswin.com Primer Series! View the full article
  16. Hello roberta,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  17. In 1998, a record 96 pitchers qualified for an earned-run average title. Major League Baseball had just expanded to 30 teams. There were more players, and more pitchers, than ever. In the years that followed, the number of ERA qualifiers – pitchers who threw at least 162 innings in a season – hovered in the eighties and nineties. Then after the 2014 season, a funny thing happened. Qualifying for an ERA title became somewhat rare. Only 78 pitchers qualified in 2015, then 74, then 58. By 2018, MLB had only 57 qualifiers or fewer than any individual season from 1901 to 1944 (when there were only 16 teams!). This coincided with a similar trend among position players. To qualify for a batting title, a hitter must make 3.1 plate appearances per team game. The trend line since 1998 isn’t as steep or as steady. Still, from 2018 to 2019, the number of batting-title qualifiers fell from 141 to 135 – the lowest number since 1992, the final season of the 26-team era. On a fundamental level, this forces us to think differently about what to expect when we watch a baseball game. It’s long been true that a starting pitcher isn’t expected to complete all nine innings, save for rare occasions. Now it’s also true that only two pitchers per team on average will throw 162 innings in a season. The Angels, in an extreme example, saw only one pitcher (Trevor Cahill) throw even 100 innings in 2019. For many clubs, the idea of using a consistent third, fourth and fifth starter over a full season is a chimera. The same goes for the bottom of every batting order. Only four and a half players per team, on average, received enough plate appearances in 2019 to qualify for the batting title. The rest of a lineup is more of a rotating cast than ever. Except when it comes to the best of the best players, managers and general managers seem content to divide their team’s workload at the cost of individual accolades. What’s going on? Injuries are partly to blame. The number of days lost to the injured list (formerly the disabled list) shot up 24 percent among position players in the last year, according to Spotrac. For starting pitchers, IL days lost increased by 4 percent. Something else is at work, too. It’s tied directly to the collection of analytical data by major-league front offices. The specifics differ from team to team, but the end result is the same: The days of the 250-inning starting pitcher, or the batter who plays all 162 games, “are gone,” said Dr. David Altchek, an orthopedic specialist with the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. “There’s not going to be a sudden reversion,” Altchek said. “We have our highest-paid players not playing. It’s ridiculous.” Welcome to MLB’s era of “load management.” The hottest buzz phrase in the NBA has been part of baseball’s fabric forever, if not its lexicon. Take the five-man starting rotation. This built-in system of rest has been the norm for generations of pitchers. Ask Danny Ozark about Steve Carlton’s “load management,” however, and he might assume you said stevedore by mistake. The change has really taken hold among position players – and not just back-of-the bench substitutes. Some degree of load management has become the norm, even among stars. In the last 11 seasons, four position players won a Most Valuable Player award while playing fewer than 140 games. That equals the number of sub-140-game MVPs from 1964 to 2008, excluding strike-shortened seasons. “Load management is probably another term for recovery,” Altchek said. “Just like any athletic endeavor, or your own training, if you go too hard too often, you start to go backwards instead of forwards. Baseball season is very long and very repetitive. It’s a challenge because you have to let these athletes recover. Nobody has a scientific measure of how much recovery they need, or don’t need. We tend to base it individually on past history.” Altchek went on to make an important distinction. Teams are collecting plenty of biomechanical data on their players these days. The proliferation of wearable tech has provided reams of information about the forces baseball players exert swinging a bat and throwing a ball. This is more true for minor leaguers than major leaguers, whose union prohibits teams from collecting certain data without the player’s permission. The question guiding baseball’s load management movement is what to do with all that data. Nestled in Altchek’s quote is a rather damning conclusion: teams are still relatively clueless. “Everyone’s more in a measurement phase than an execution phase,” he said. “Nobody really knows yet. We’re more in a data-collection phase, the first inning of this sport science phenomenon.” Related Articles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani cleared to begin throwing off a mound Free agent lefty Rich Hill had elbow surgery, out until midseason 2020 Del Mar consensus picks for Saturday, Nov. 23 After second meeting with Angels over stadium lease, mayor says ‘it’s clear’ they share same goals Alexander: Lancaster loves the JetHawks, but MLB may shut them down Absent any sophisticated specificity, then, we see a general trend toward more rest. A manager might hope that sitting his third baseman on Monday will make him more effective on Tuesday, but for now it is still a hope. The hard data to support that conclusion just isn’t there yet. This is more true for position players than pitchers, whose velocity, spin rate, and spin efficiency might offer clues about his health. Still, said one MLB pitching coordinator, there’s “still a lot of work to be done.” None of this will console the fan who came to the ballpark expecting to see his or her favorite player, only to learn he got the day off because he’s played 20 games in a row. Maybe 20 games is a bit too ambitious for 2019. Cal Ripken Jr. famously holds the record for most consecutive games played, with 2,632. That record will never be broken. Entering the 2020 season, the active leader in consecutive regular-season games played is Kansas City Royals outfielder/second baseman Whit Merrifield. Merrifield has played 247 consecutive games. View the full article
  18. Shohei Ohtani, whose rehab from Tommy John surgery was interrupted in September by knee surgery, has been cleared to throw from a mound, Angels general manager Billy Eppler said Tuesday. Ohtani is expected to throw from the mound for three to four weeks before concluding his rehab, which will allow him about a month and a half of rest before the start of spring training. The Angels are hoping to have Ohtani resume his role as a two-way player in 2020, most likely pitching one day a week and serving as the designated hitter three or four days a week. Ohtani spent the 2019 season as a hitter only because of the rehab from Tommy John surgery, which was performed Oct. 1, 2018. In September, with the Angels out of the race, the club and Ohtani opted to shut him down for surgery to repair a bipartite patella in his left knee. The congenital condition, in which the knee cap is split into two bones, had been bothering Ohtani since spring training, although not enough to warrant surgery until nearly the end of the season. At the time, Ohtani was nearly done with his throwing rehab. The increase in throwing intensity off a mound aggravated the knee condition, so the Angels opted to stop his throwing and have him undergo knee surgery. It pushed back his total rehab time by about two months. Related Articles After second meeting with Angels over stadium lease, mayor says ‘it’s clear’ they share same goals Angels add Jahmai Jones, Hector Yan to 40-man roster Alexander: Mike Trout, Cody Bellinger help SoCal corner the market on MVPs Angels’ Mike Trout named AL MVP for 3rd time Angels open to trading young players to fill holes like starting pitching View the full article
  19. Hello BigMikeMVP,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  20. Welcome to this year’s version of the AngelsWin Top 30 Prospects. As with last year, it is a group effort: the following is a composite list of several AngelsWin.com members and writers, with eight participants this year. The method is simple: the list is an average of eight lists. The benefit of taking such an approach is that not only do we tend to even each other’s biases out a bit, but we also get a range of approaches: from relying mostly on stats, reading other scouting reports, and eye-witness scouting. Unlike last year, I’m going to include the age the player will be for the 2020 season, meaning how old they are on July 1, 2020. A note on Ranking Trends: it is simply the different rankings by the eight participants. Most such lists don’t include the “raw wiring,” but as with last year I thought it would be interesting for people see because the range of numbers say a lot about the prospect. Prospects with a relatively narrow range tend to be more predictable, while those with a wider range may also have a wider range of outcomes and greater volatility. Finally, a big thanks to Scotty Allen (aka "Second Base") for providing the insightful Best Known For quotes. On to the list… 1. JO ADELL OF (age 21) Stats: .289/.359/.475, 10 HR in 76 games in A+/AA/AAA. Ranking Trends: Consensus #1. ETA: 2020. Comments: The second year in a row as the consensus #1 Angels prospect, Adell is now considered one of the top five prospects in all of baseball – despite missing the first couple months of the year with a rather freakish double whammy hamstring/ankle injury. MLB Pipeline currently has him at #5, while Baseball America has him at #2. Adell’s stat line above is somewhat diminished by a relatively poor showing in AAA at the end of the year (.264/.321/.355 in 27 games), but his performance in AA (.308/.390/.553, 8 HR and 173 wRC+ in 43 games) is more indicative of his talent level. Adell is a tremendous athlete with prodigious power and great make-up; if there’s one knock on his game its that he doesn’t make as much contact as you’d like, and has only average plate discipline; but both should improve as he matures. He’s the real deal, the best Angels prospect since Mike Trout, and will make his debut in Anaheim sometime in 2020. Best Known For: Blend of power, speed, and athleticism at such a young age. 2. BRANDON MARSH OF (age 22) Stats: .286/.367/.407, 7 HR and 19 SB in 101 Rookie/AA games. Ranking Trends: Consensus #2. ETA: 2020. Comments: Somewhat overshadowed by his friend and team-mate Adell, Brandon Marsh is an excellent prospect in his own right. That stat line is marred by a 1-21 streak in Rookie ball rehabbing an injury; he hit .300/.383/.428 in AA. He has not yet hit for power, but he’ll hit his share of extra base hits and should at least develop average HR power in the majors, possibly more. Despite having less impressive raw tools, in some ways Marsh is a more well-rounded prospect than Adell, with better contact and plate discipline, and at this point is a superior defender. Like his soon-to-be AAA Salt Lake team-mate, he’ll probably make his major league debut sometime in 2020, if he gets the opportunity. Best Known For: Well-rounded game. Beard, and tantalizing power-speed potential. 3. JORDYN ADAMS OF (age 20) Stats: .257/.351/.369, 8 HR and 16 SB 109 R/A/A+ games. Ranking Trends: Seven #3s, one #4. ETA: 2023. Comments: Considering that Adams was a two-sport player and more committed to football than baseball a year and a half ago, the fact that he held his own in single A as a 19-year old is room for optimism. There’s a lot to like in his performance: not only is he flashing Adell-esque tools (and he’s even faster), but his 56 walks in 109 games is very heartening. Perhaps most importantly, Adams seemed to improve as the year went on: after a slow start, he hit .287/.369/.414 from May 10 on, and .325/.406/.504 from July 13 on. Expect for a breakthrough year in A+ Rancho Cucamonga this year. While Adams is still raw, he’s learning quickly and is on the fast track. Best Known For: One of the top prep football players in the nation coming out of high school. Also, “The Dunk”. Also, the highest upside prospect in the system. 4. CHRIS RODRIGUEZ RHP (21) Stats: 0.00 ERA, 3 GS, 9.1 IP, 4 walks, 13 strikeouts. Ranking Trends: Four #4s, three #5s, one #9. ETA: 2021. Comments: Chris Rodriguez’s high ranking might come as a surprise due to the fact that he’s only pitched 9.1 innings in the last two years, all within 2019. But the stuff is real: Aside from possibly Jack Kochanowicz, he has the highest ceiling in the minor leagues. The question is whether he can stay healthy, and that is a big question. If he does, his ascendency to the majors will be fast and furious. Best Known For: Mid-90’s fastball, and mid/front of the rotation upside. 5. PATRICK SANDOVAL LHP (23) Stats: 5.03 ERA, 39.1 IP, 19 walks, 42 strikeouts in the majors. Ranking Trends: 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 7. ETA: 2019. Comments: When Sandoval came over to the Angels in July of 2018, from the Astros for Martin Maldonado, the general view was that he was a classic high-floor but low-ceiling starter, the type of guy you don’t mind having as your 5th starter but not much more. In his nine starts in the majors, he showed flashes of something more, a bonafide mid-rotation starter, if everything comes together. Best Known For: His fastball climbing 4-5 mph in the last two years since the Astros traded him. 6. JEREMIAH JACKSON SS (20) Stats: .266/.333/.605, 23 HR in 65 games in Orem (high Rookie ball). Ranking Trends: 5, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 9. ETA: 2023. Comments: I think the key phrase would be “cautiously excited.” 23 HR in 65 games for a 19-year old is impressive, but its all accompanied by 96 strikeouts and a mediocre .266 BA. He walked 24 times, which is a decent rate; given his swing and miss, developing plate discipline may be the key to Jackson becoming a star. Best Known For: Breaking the Pioneer League HR record as a 19 year old. 7. JOSE SORIANO RHP (21) Stats: 2.51 ERA, 82.1 IP, 51 walks, 92 strikeouts in Rookie and A ball (Burlington). Ranking Trends: 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 23. ETA: 2021. Comments: Soriano and Rodriguez are often mentioned in the same breath. While on one level it is a ceiling/floor comparison, Soriano’s ceiling isn’t that much lower, and his floor seems quite a bit higher. If his control develops, he could be in Anaheim rather quickly. Best Known For: Mid to upper 90’s fastball and wipeout slider. 8. JAHMAI JONES 2B (22) Stats: .234/.308/.324, 5 HR and 9 SB in 130 games in AAA Salt Lake. Ranking Trends: 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9 ETA: 2021 Comments: Jones not only had a very bad year statistically speaking, it was also his second year in a row of declining performance: his OPS slipped from .794 in 2017 (A/A+), .717 in 2018 (A+/AA) to .631 in 2019 (AA). That said, he did improve later in the year, both hitting well in the Arizona Fall League (.302/.377/.509 in 61 PA), but also towards the end of the regular year, hitting .306/.385/.414 from July 5th on, or 51 games. So while he didn’t make that jump into elite prospect status that we might have hoped for after 2017, he’s still a good prospect. Depending what the Angels do with Andrelton Simmons and Tommy La Stella after 2020, don’t be surprised if the 2021 infield includes Fletcher, Rengifo, and Jones. Best Known For: Power-speed potential as a middle infielder, and the younger brother of NFL Wide Receiver T.J. Jones. 9. KYREN PARIS SS (18) Stats: .300/.462/.400 in 13 PA in Rookie ball (AZL). Ranking Trends: 6, 9, 9, 10, 10, 10, 13, 14. ETA: 2024 Comments: While it is rather early to be too excited about Paris, the upside is real: this is a talented young baseball player who just turned 18 a couple weeks ago from this writing, on November 11. He’s a toolsy shortstop, a good defender for his age, and really only lacks power – although that could develop. Before the draft last year, when he went 55th overall (2nd round), websites and analysts had him anywhere from #34 (Fangraphs), #48 (Keith Law), #70 (Baseball America), and #75 (MLB Pipeline). There’s a lot of volatility at this point; a couple years from now he could be another Livan Soto—a defense-first middle infielder who profiles as a major league bench player—or he could be an elite prospect, if the bat develops as hoped. Stay tuned. Best Known For: Delivering one of the better post-draft interviews with Victor and Gubi. A very well spoken young man. 10. WILL WILSON 2B/SS (21) Stats: .275/.329/.439 in 46 games in Rookie ball. Ranking Trends: 7, 8, 8, 8, 9, 10, 10, 29. ETA: 2022 Comments: At this point it is difficult to say whether the tepid view on Wilson is warranted in that, on one hand, he seems like another unexciting college draft pick with limited upside in the tradition of Matt Thaiss and CJ Cron; on the other, not only is he rather young for a college player, but the scouting reports on his bat are promising. At the least, he deserves a chance to prove himself before calling him an over-draft. Wilson could be better than expected, so let’s see how he hits with a full season of experience: he could move fast. Best Known For: The Angels first round draft pick from this last draft. Bat first middle infielder. 11. JACK KOCHANOWICZ RHP (19) Stats: Did not play professional baseball. Ranking Trends: 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 12, 15, 17. ETA: 2024. Comments: Upside, upside, upside. At 6’6” and 220 lbs, Kochanowicz can bring the heat. In my mind, he is the pitching equivalent of Kyren Paris: a couple years from now he could be #1 on this list, or another cautionary tale about getting too excited too soon. But the stuff is real, and he’s very young. He’ll be one of the most exciting prospects to watch in 2020. Best Known For: Hitting upper-90’s at Fall Instructs. One scout said that he believed Kochanowicz would go top five in the draft three years from now had he decided to go to college instead. 12. AARON HERNANDEZ RHP (23) Stats: 4.46 ERA, 72.2 IP, 46 walks, 81 strikeouts in A+ ball (Inland Empire). Ranking Trends: 11, 11, 12, 13, 13, 15, 15, 20. ETA: 2021. Comments: Hernandez simply needs more minor league innings, and should be in Anaheim before you know it. He’s got the upside to be a mid-rotation starter, but may settle in a bit below that, or as a reliever. But he seems to have a rather high floor for a pitching prospect and, one way or another, should be part of the major league team within the next year or two. Best Known For: Other than sharing a name with an unfortunate soul mid-90’s fastball with movement and a strong finish to the 2019 season. 13. HECTOR YAN LHP (21) Stats: 3.72 ERA in 109 IP, 52 walks, and 148 strikeouts in A ball (Burlington). Ranking Trends: 11, 12, 13, 13, 14, 16, 16, 16. ETA: 2022. Comments: Take a look at those strikeouts and walks, and you see why Yan is ranked where he is. 12.2 Ks per 9 innings is no joke, but neither are 4.3 walks. We can hope that Yan can remain a starter, but his path to the majors may be as a relief pitcher. Either way, he’s one of a handful of pitching prospects in the organization with legitimate upside. Best Known For: Recently being added to the Angels 40 man roster from A Ball. Sidearmer with mid-90’s fastball. 14. D’SHAWN KNOWLES OF (19) Stats: .241/.310/.387 in 64 games in Rookie ball (Orem). Ranking Trends: 12, 12, 13, 16, 16, 18, 21, 28. ETA: 2023 Comments: Remember when D’Shawn was an after-thought to Trent Deveaux? He had a surprising 2018, but fell back to earth in 2019 – a rather disappointing follow-up. He doesn’t seem to have Deveaux’s elite athleticism, but may also have that “it factor” to become more than the sum of his parts. At 19 years old and with Adell, Marsh, and Hermosillo ahead of him, he’s got plenty of time. Best Known For: Being the “other” top international signing from the Bahamas two years ago. 15. MICHAEL HERMOSILLO OF (25) Stats: .243/.330/.466 in 64 games in A+/AAA; .139/.304/.222 in 18 major league games. Ranking Trends: 11, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 22, 28. ETA: 2019. Comments: Hermosillo seems like the type of player that could become a fan favorite, the Brock Holt of the Angels. Or at least that’s his upside. He’s got the tools to be a terrific 4th outfielder, and could even be a starter on some teams. But he’s got to make more contact first, and may be destined for another organization to get regular playing time. Best Known For: Prep exploits on the gridiron and overall athleticism. 16. KEVIN MAITAN IF (20) Stats: .214/.278/.323 in 123 games in A Burlington. Ranking Trends: 11, 12, 18, 18, 20, 20, 20, 26. ETA: 2023. Comments: If you didn’t know about the hype from a few years ago, Maitan would be an intriguing prospect – and he is. But it is hard not to get around the ridiculous comparisons that were thrown around, like Miguel Cabrera and Chipper Jones. Imagine being a 16-year old and hearing that. The hitting tools are there to be a major leaguer, and it is important to remember that he’s still quite young for his level – according to Baseball-Reference the league differential last year was -2.2. So while he isn’t the Promised One that the Braves originally thought he was, he still has a lot of time to actualize the good potential he does possess. Best Known For: Being one of the more hyped international signings in recent memory. Big time power. 17. STIWARD AQUINO RHP (21) Stats: 6.87 ERA in 36.2 IP, 16 walks and 49 strikeouts in Rookie ball. Ranking Trends: 8, 14, 16, 17, 19, 22, 25, 27. ETA: 2023. Comments: Another live arm with a wide range of possible outcomes, which is well-reflected in the ranking trends. Aquino’s numbers don’t look impressive, but he flashed good potential at times. His game log displays erratic performance, so hopefully with more innings he’ll settle down. Another pitcher whose future might be in the bullpen. Best Known For: A great name and a mid-90’s fastball. 18. ALEXANDER RAMIREZ OF (17) Stats: .234/.328/.429 in 39 games in the Dominican League (Foreign Rookie). Ranking Trends: 15, 15, 15, 17, 17, 19, 28, NR. ETA: 2025. Comments: There’s not a lot to go on at this point, but there’s a reason Billy Eppler gave the young Dominican a $1 million signing bonus upon turning 16 years old. He should be coming States-side in 2020, so look for him in the AZL. He is very young, just 17 in August, and has a ton of young outfielders ahead of him, but is at least worth having in the back of your mind as a high-ceiling prospect to look forward to. Best Known For: Angels top international signee from last year. Power and speed are more advanced than originally anticipated. 19. KYLE BRADISH RHP (23) Stats: 4.28 ERA in 101 IP, 53 walks and 120 strikeouts in A+ Inland Empire. Ranking Trends: 12, 15, 21, 21, 21, 23, 24, 25. ETA: 2021. Comments: Bradish may forever be paired with Aaron Hernandez, as he was drafted right after him. Like Hernandez, he’s a college pitcher who projects as a major league starter, but is considered to have a lower ceiling. Clearly he has to work on his control, but after a solid first professional season, he’s establishing a solid floor to build from. Best Known For: Advanced college arm that will climb the minor league ladder quickly. 20. JARED WALSH OF/1B/RHP (26) Stats: .325/.423/.686, 36 HR in 98 AAA games (Salt Lake); .203/.276/.329 in 31 major league games. Pitching: 4.15 ERA, 13 IP, 5 walks and 9 strikeouts in AAA; 1.80 ERA, 5 IP, 6 walks, 5 strikeouts in the majors. Ranking Trends: 12, 18, 19, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27. ETA: 2019 Comments: It is hard not to like Walsh. Not only did he absolutely kill AAA pitching, but he is also trying to make it as a two-way player in the majors. Unlike Taylor Ward, this gives him a flexibility that might give him a longer leash as a useful—even ideal-- “26th man” on the major league roster next year. Best Known For: Being the Angels “other” two-way player. 21. TRENT DEVEAUX OF (20) Stats: .238/.320/.422 in 60 games in Rookie ball (AZL, Orem). Ranking Trends: 13, 17, 18, 19, 21, 23, 29, NR. ETA: 2023. Comments: After a disappointing season in 2018 (.199/.309/.247 in 44 AZL games), Deveaux adjusted well to States-side professional baseball, showing flashes of the potential that led the Angels to sign him. There’s a lot to like here, but he simply needs time to develop. He’s probably got both a higher ceiling and lower floor than his fellow Bahamanian, D’Shawn Knowles. He’s a good candidate for a breakout season in 2020, which should be his first full season in A ball. Best Known For: Being the Angels top international signee from two years ago. Bahamian with 80-grade speed. 22. OLIVER ORTEGA RHP (23) Stats: 4.14 ERA in 111 IP, 57 walks and 135 strikeouts in A+/AA ball. Ranking Trends: 14, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 26, NR. ETA: 2021. Comments: Ortega seemed to come out of nowhere and reminds us that players do indeed rise up from the Dominican League through the minor leagues. He’s on the verge of the major league radar. Best Known For: Bursting onto the scene at the end of last year and beginning of this year with mid-90’s fastball. 23. AROL VERA SS (17) Stats: Did not play. Ranking Trends: 14, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24, NR, NR. ETA: 2025. Comments: A top international signing, the word on Vera is that he’s a tall (6’2”), lean, and promising switch-hitting shortstop with a strong hit-tool. He’s a long way away, but fits in a similar category with Alexander Ramirez. Best Known For: Angels most expensive international signee since Roberto Baldoquin (not counting Kevin Maitan). Great power projection from both sides of the plate. 24. WILLIAM HOLMES OF/RHP (19) Stats: .326/.431/.488 in 11 Rookie games; 5.18 ERA, 24.1 IP, 20 walks, 38 strikeouts. Ranking Trends: 17, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 26, NR. ETA: 2023. Comments: The third two-player in the Angels system, along with Ohtani and Walsh. Holmes is the player formerly known as William English. There’s a lot to like here, with a nice showing with the bat and some promise on the mound. Best Known For: Being the rare draftee from Detroit, also happens to be a two-way player with scattered intriguing skills on both sides of the ball. 25. LUIZ GOHARA LHP (23) Stats: Did not play (injuries). Ranking Trends: 16, 17, 19, 22, 24, 28, 29 NR. ETA: 2018. Comments: Released by the Braves, the Angels signed the Brazilian Gohara as a free agent in August. He’s pretty much the definition of a potential “clean peanut,” which also makes him really difficult to assess. Before the 2018 season, Baseball America ranked as the #23 prospect in all of baseball—that was after dominating A+ and AA, and getting a solid taste of AAA, even five starts in the majors at the age of 20 years old. But then his troubles began, and he didn’t perform well in the minors and eventually missed all of 2019 with a shoulder injury. While it is easly to get excited about his upside, the Braves released him for a reason. We can hope that they made a terrible mistake, but don’t count on it. Gohara goes into the 2020 season as perhaps the biggest in-house wildcard that could make a surprise impact on the major league pitching staff. Best Known For: Being one of the top prospects in all of baseball only a little over a year ago. Used to have upper-90’s heat before shoulder injury. Currently rehabbing from surgery. One of the very rare Brazilian baseball players. 26. ROBINSON PINA RHP (21) Stats: 3.83 ERA, 108 IP, 61 walks, 146 strikeouts in A ball (Burlington). Ranking Trends: 13, 20, 20, 25, 27, 27, 30, NR. ETA: 2023. Comments: Given his performance in 2019, it is almost surprising that Pina isn’t ranked higher. But if he continues this level of play in A+ and above, he could leapfrog several pitching prospects by year’s end. Definitely one to watch, with major league potential. Best Known For: Tall and lanky. Herky-jerky motion. Misses lots of bats. Reports indicate low-90’s fastball . 27. LUIS MADERO RHP (23) Stats: 5.03 ERA, 105.2 IP, 31 walks, 98 strikeouts in A+/AA. Ranking Trends: 10, 20, NR, NR, NR, NR, NR, NR. ETA: 2022 Comments: Madero was a bit of a darling among Angelswin prospects hounds after his breakout 2018 campaign (3.49 ERA, 27 walks and 95 strikeouts in 105.2 IP in A/A+). While his ERA rose substantially, his peripherals held steady and perhaps we’re being a bit too bearish on him. He isn’t far from being on the major league depth chart. Best Known For: Mid-90’s fastball. Added to the Angels 40-man ahead of last year’s Rule 5 Draft. 28. LIVAN SOTO SS/2B (20) Stats: .220/.304/.256 in 311 PA in A/Rookie ball. Ranking Trends: 14, 24, 30, NR, NR, NR, NR, NR. ETA: 2024. Comments: The second of the “stolen” Braves prospects, Soto had a disappointing follow-up to his promising first year in the Angels farm system. Right now he projects as a very weak-hitting but solid fielding middle infielder, but he’s also got some physical development ahead of him. 2020 should give us a better sense of his ultimate potential. Best Known For: Being the “other” prospect the Braves lost that the Angels signed. Defensive wizard. Weighs about as much as a women’s olympic gymnast. 29. ADRIAN RONDON IF (21) Stats: .266/.317/.378 in 69 games in Rookie/A ball. Ranking Trends: 25, 25, 26, 27, 30, NR, NR, NR. ETA: 2023. Comments: We’ve got a Rondon! Eppler seems to like former highly regarded international prospects; while never quite as lauded as Maitan, Rondon’s story is similar: the Tampa Rays gave him a $3 million signing bonus in 2015, but he struggled in the minor leagues. He held his own last year, but nothing exciting – so far. There’ still untapped potential and relative youth on his side. Best Known For: One of the more hyped international signees in recent memory. Angels traded practically nothing for him. Great bat speed, recently moved to 3B. 30. GARRETT STALLINGS RHP (22) Stats: Did not play. Ranking Trends: 22, 25, 29, 29, 29, NR, NR, NR. ETA: 2022. Comments: The Angels’ 5th round pick in 2019, Stallings is a bit of a sleeper pick who could reach the majors relatively quickly. He probably projects as a back-end starter, but is one to keep an eye on. Best Known For: Brilliant performance in the heavily scouted Cape Cod League. Could climb the minor league ladder very quickly. Other Ranked Players: Jeremy Beasley, Jose Bonilla, Denny Brady, Sadrac Franco, Jake Jewell, Orlando Martinez, Isaac Mattson, Leonardo Rivas, Jose Rojas, Andrew Wantz, Austin Warren.
  21. Hello kerthii,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  22. Anaheim Mayor Harry Sidhu presented his vision for a long-term relationship with the Angels in a second round of talks between the city and its hometown baseball team on Friday, Nov. 22. “We want to keep baseball here, see fair market value for land and added benefits for our city,” Sidhu said in a prepared statement released after the several-hour meeting. “It’s clear that the Angels share these goals and have heard the input of our City Council.” Friday was the second formal face-to-face meeting between the two sides’ negotiating teams, but beyond their statements officials continue to offer few specifics of what could be a decades-long deal for Angel Stadium. “We were pleased to meet with the negotiating team today and continue to make progress in our talks regarding our future in Anaheim,” Angels spokeswoman Marie Garvey said. The rest of the council got a closed-door briefing on Nov. 19 on the first meeting, which was Nov. 15, and will repeat that process Dec. 3 with an update on what happened Friday. City spokesman Mike Lyster said the negotiating parties may meet next week, but a date hasn’t been set. The Angels have played in Anaheim’s stadium since 1966, and their current lease gives them until Dec. 31 to opt out or stay through 2029. Earlier attempts to craft a new lease fell apart in 2016. The acres of parking surrounding the stadium – and their potential for development – is widely expected to figure in any new deal. The city recently had the land appraised, but has not made the results public. City officials have said they expect the stadium to someday help anchor a vibrant sports/entertainment district, filled with restaurants, shops, homes and hotels. Anaheim could sell or lease the land to the Angels, and development revenue could help pay to improve or replace the aging stadium. Others would like to see for an agreement that guarantees community benefits, such as preferences for hiring local businesses and workers or direct support for community programs and facilities. The Angels notified the city last fall they were opting out of their lease, which would have meant they’d be out of the stadium by this October. But in January, the council – at Sidhu’s direction – reinstated the original lease and gave the team until the end of this year to opt out. Some critics, Councilman Jose Moreno chief among them, have questioned why it took 10 months for the city and team to start negotiations, and they’ve worried the process will be rushed and lacking in transparency for the public. But in statements after both meetings, Sidhu said any proposed agreement “would go before the City Council for open, public consideration” and would be made public in advance. Related links Anaheim leaders report encouraging first meeting with Angels over stadium lease Anaheim council agrees on key stadium issues ahead of future meetings with Angels Angel Stadium talks: What constitutes a ‘fair’ lease deal for Anaheim? Stadium maintenance, debt eat into Anaheim’s revenue from hosting Angels baseball View the full article
  23. Hello RobotWillie,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png

  24. The Angels added infielder Jahmai Jones and left-hander Hector Yan to their 40-man roster before Wednesday’s deadline, protecting them from the Rule 5 draft while leaving fan favorite José Rojas exposed. Jones, 22, is currently ranked the Angels’ eighth-best prospect, according to MLB Pipeline. Drafted as an outfielder but moved to second base in 2018, Jones spent all of the 2019 season at Double-A Mobile (Ala.), hitting .234 with a .636 OPS. Yan, 20, posted a 3.39 ERA at Class-A Burlington (Iowa) last season, with 148 strikeouts in 109 innings. MLB Pipeline ranked him 17th in the Angels’ system. With the two additions, the Angels’ 40-man roster is full. Angels top prospects such as Jo Adell and Brandon Marsh did not need to be protected from the Rule 5 draft because they haven’t been in the system long enough. Players are eligible after their fourth season if they signed at 19 or older, and after their fifth season if they were younger. The Rule 5 draft will be on Dec. 12, the final day of the winter meetings. Players selected in the Rule 5 draft need to be kept on the major league roster all season, or else they must be offered back to their former club. Typically, only 15 to 20 players in all of baseball are selected in the major league portion of the Rule 5 draft. Of the prospects the Angels left vulnerable, Rojas drew the most fan interest. A 36th-round pick out of Vanguard University of Costa Mesa, Rojas .293 with 31 homers and a .938 OPS this season at Triple-A Salt Lake. Rojas, 26, bounced around several different defensive positions, failing to establish himself at any. MLB Pipeline does not list Rojas among the organization’s top 30 prospects. Last year the Angels left Jared Walsh unprotected after a similar Triple-A season, and Walsh went unselected in the Rule 5 draft and made his debut with the Angels in 2019. The top pitching prospect left unprotected, according to MLB Pipeline, is right-hander Oliver Ortega, who is ranked 18th. Ortega, 23, struck out 123 in 94-1/3 innings at Class-A before struggling in five games at Double-A in 2019. Related Articles Alexander: Mike Trout, Cody Bellinger help SoCal corner the market on MVPs Angels’ Mike Trout named AL MVP for 3rd time Angels open to trading young players to fill holes like starting pitching Scott Boras had lunch with Arte Moreno, sparking speculation about Angels’ pursuit of Gerrit Cole Mets’ Jacob deGrom, Astros’ Justin Verlander win 2nd Cy Young Awards; Dodgers’ Hyun-Jin Ryu finishes 2nd View the full article
  25. Hello Stewie88,

    Welcome to AngelsWin.com. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others.

    To kick things off, introduce yourself to the community of Angels fans here: 

     

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    Best Regards,

    AngelsWin.com

    emailheader.png