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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/2021 in all areas

  1. 17 points
  2. Ohtani is slap bang in his prime; Trout is approaching the end of his and may already be declining, our elite 3rd baseman Rendon will be 32 next year. We have the outfield we've been talking about for years in Adell, Trout and Marsh, and an infield set on both sides of the ball aside from Short-stop (where we have promising youngsters only a season or two away). We finally have a conveyor belt of promising pitching coming up from the minors, with three (or four if you include Canning) ready for the rotation to add to Ohtani's ace-like arm, and some interesting guys for the bullpen. Surely now, this off-season, is the time to go all-in. To use some of the farm depth we've built up for trades and to blow the budget open for a year until Upton is off the books to put the pieces around Trout, Ohtani and a very good supporting cast that are needed to make the Angels genuine contenders. I can't see how the window will be any more open in 2023 than it is for 2022: the time is now.
    14 points
  3. I think people get waaaaay too upset about the Angels failures from November to February. You really don’t become a good team by what you do in the winter. You become a good team by the way you develop your own players (minors and majors) during the season. The guys you acquire are a small piece of the puzzle and they’re probably going to balance each other out by some being good and some being bad. So you need to lift the floor that those guys sit on by having a lot of young guys from your system providing value. So you’ve always got an 85-win base and if your acquisitions work better one year it goes to 95. There’s no way you can count on acquisitions lifting you enough if you have a 75-win base.
    13 points
  4. I don’t know about the rest of you all but I am kind of looking forward to seeing what he and Trout can do in the line up when they’re both healthy
    13 points
  5. As bad as this season was, today the AP contract is officially behind them. You gotta call that a win.
    13 points
  6. 13 points
  7. Looks like a throwback to a time when people could only afford to eat meat once a week.
    12 points
  8. Agree with a lot of the stuff being said here.
    12 points
  9. It would be worth considering if Ohtani weren't one of the most marketable players in all of professional sports. And it's not just an 'arte marketing' thing but I think any franchise with such a high profile player would have to get such a boat load of prospects that I'm not sure you could ever achieve proper value. Maybe from a value to the 'team on the field' but perhaps not to the overall value to the franchise. Here's a funny statement (or at least I think it is). The Angels have players that have either been too good or too bad to trade.
    12 points
  10. Knock Seattle out of the postseason. All hands on deck. Angels need to man up this weekend and get it done! Finish this season with some pride and satisfaction.
    12 points
  11. I wanted to tease out a specific element from this thread, specifically a remark from Dan O'Dowd that I addressed in a long post on the second page, but had a follow-up thought that I wanted to develop more fully. Dan O'Dowd said: "It's not just about spending money in this game, it's about developing an organization that operates wholly, from every aspect to make your big league team good." This "holistic approach" is key, and what separates the really successful organizations from the pack. Or rather, I would posit three general types of organizations: The contenders: These are the teams that understand the holistic perspective, who are perennial contenders or, at least, go through cycles of contention and short fallow periods between. The pretenders: These are teams that, on paper, should contend--they have the resources and certainly at least make a show of doing so--but for whatever reason, rarely seem to get there, and only for short periods of time. The fakers: These are the organizations who clearly aren't really trying, with owners for whom their teams are just cash-cows. Now it is really more of a spectrum and not every team can be so cleanly categorized, but think it is clear from the above which category I'd place the Angels in, but just to be blunt, they're a classic "pretender." During the first decade of the century, they looked like they had finally arrived as a "contender," but then that horrible 2010-13 phase occurred in which the front office flailed in trying to get back to previous glory, making moves that proved to be devastating for the next decade. But to return to the O'Dowd quote, what set me off to start a new thread is that I saw several posts discussing whether or not the Angels would be able to attract a top free agent starter. I mean, we all remember losing out to Gerrit Cole a couple years ago, which prompted the Angels to sign Anthony Rendon, and most of us remember losing Zack Greinke to free agency, which led to the ill-fated Josh Hamilton contract. There is an obvious similarity in the two, separated by seven years: You want one thing that your team actually needs, and if you don't get it, you go after the shiniest consolation prize available (another such instance that comes to mind is the Beltre/Wells debacle of 2011). What a I see happening, time and time again, is that fans, including myself, are caught in a vicious cycle that echoes this repeating GM error: We recognize clear needs that the Angels have, and then feel a kind of almost desperation that either the Angels get what they need, or all is lost, which leads to the kind of surrogate compensation like Wells, Hamilton, and Rendon. (As an aside, to be fair to Rendon, he was and presumably still is a very good player, who should be expected to bounce back next year. Meaning, I don't think he's a Wellsian or Hamiltonian blunder, just a very expensive player that the Angels probably didn't absolutely need, and thus those resources--$35M a year--could have been spent more wisely elsewhere) But here's the key point: the problem is not that the Angels don't get the guy they desperately need, it is that they desperately need him in the first place. Meaning, the problem is holistic: that the organization doesn't have the depth to churn out the players it needs from within. If you look at the very top orgs, they often seem to sign big free agents or trade for star players that they don't need. Did the Dodgers "need" MVP-candidate Trea Turner or Cy Young candidate Max Scherzer? Not really, but they're great players and not only solidified their playoff chances, but improve their already very good chances of going deep into the postseason. The point being, they were acquisitions made not out of desperation, but more a sense of augmentation. They added to what was already a very good team. The Dodgers were 62-43 (.590) on July 30, the day they acquired Scherzer and Turner, just three games behind the Giants and 6.5 games ahead of the second wildcard. Meaning, they were probably already going to make the playoffs; Scherzer and Turner just made them even better, and the team went on a 44-13 (.772) run. What we can learn from this, and probably many other similar instances, whether during the season or offseason, is that premier free agents should not be acquired as a way to make a bad or mediocre team good; they should be acquired to improve an already good team. Why? Because they are just one player. I think you could say that almost all of the Angels big free agents and trade acquisitions over the last decade were made from the perspective of hoping that the "big splash" would turn the team from mediocrity to contention. Compound that with the fact that such moves were often made in desperation and/or as consolation prizes and, well, you get Vernon Wells, Albert Pujols, Josh Hamilton, and even Justin Upton and Anthony Rendon, to some extent. SO here's my recommendation for Perry Minasian and even Arte Moreno. No single free agent is going to get the organization to where we all want it to get to. No two or even three free agents. If the Angels make the playoffs next year, the primary reason likely will not be whoever you acquire this offseason, but who you already have and how they developed and played. Meaning, the homegrown and already present core: the big three of Trout, Ohtani, and Rendon; the complementary players like Fletcher, Walsh, and Stassi; the young starters like Ohtani (again), Sandoval, Suarez, and Canning; and the talented up-and-comers like Adell and Marsh, Detmers and Rodriguez. And furthermore, the increasing depth on the farm, which is seeing the upper levels fill out with, if not future stars, then at least a bunch of players who could play a role over the next few years. And a deepening farm system with higher upside talent in the low minors. In a way, it comes back to what we all know (or should know): Build from within, supplement from without. And, to say it once more: The problem is not missing out on the free agents you want, but in desperately needing them in the first place, and compounding that problem by spending big on guys you don't really need or aren't very good. In a way it is as if the Angels keep making the same mistake: "Going for it" before they're ready, as if they can fake it until they make it. Thankfully Perry seems to be taking a slightly different approach*, thus the lack of long-term contracts last offseason. Hopefully he continues, and doesn't start working out of desperation to please the big man (Arte) or the illogical fan-base, or even the superstars (Trout and Ohtani). I hope Trout means what he says, that he trusts Perry. And moreso, I hope that Perry deserves our trust, in undestanding the dynamic that I've laid out here. Only time will tell. This offseason won't make or break the Angels--that is kind of part of my point--but it will tell us a lot about where Perry's head is, and to what degree he understands what O'Dowd said, and I tried to elaborate on. *Addendum: Just to expand upon this a bit more, I will repeat what I said last offseason, when some were disappointed that Perry hadn't made a "big splash." I said that my guess was that he is taking a year to assess the organization, to really get to know it, how it runs, what its strengths and weaknesses are. This was implied by short-term deals and no major commitments. I think that is still basically true and, the silver lining of this past year, now should have a better sense of how to proceed forward.
    11 points
  12. so I have almost all of October off right?
    11 points
  13. I hope the Angels are good someday so we can talk about baseball again.
    11 points
  14. While this has been yet another disappointing year, for those wondering what to be happy about, here's a list of things to consider. First and foremost, the performance of Shohei Ohtani. Yes, his bat has been weak for the last two months, but he had a better season than anyone expected and pretty much fulfilled the best-case scenario: healthy and excellent as both a hitter and pitcher, finishing around 8 WAR. The development of Reid Detmers and Chris Rodriguez. Yes, there were bumps along the way, but Detmers will be just fine, and Rodriguez showed he can handle major league hitters, after not facing anyone above A+. Worst-case scenario and he's a really good reliever. Young pitching, folks. Brandon Marsh and Jo Adell holding their own in the majors. Marsh looked like a major leaguer from day one and while he obviously has stuff to work on, he has the makings of a very good major leaguer. As many have noted, Adell looked completely different this year and should continue to improve. Neither are stars yet, but both should--at least--be quality major league regulars, and maybe more. The emergence of Patrick Sandoval and Jose Suarez. Maybe neither will be more than #3s, but nothing to complain about cost-controlled, young #3 starters. Jared Walsh and Max Stassi have both been pretty good. They might not be stars, but Stassi has the 9th highest WAR (3.0) among all catchers with at least 100 PA, and the highest among all catchers with fewer than 350 PA. Walsh started super hot, then was terrible, then equalized and his overall line is pretty good: a solid, league average first baseman, which is better than Pujols was for years. Or to put it another way, Walsh's 2.3 WAR is better than all but two of Albert's Angels seasons (2012 and 2014). While there are as many disappointments, there have been some positive developments and surprises in the minors: Michael Stefanic, Brandon Davis, Davis Daniel, Kyren Paris, Arol Vera, Edgar Quero, and several others, including a pitching heavy draft that includes Sam Bachman and Ky Bush, plus a bunch of possibly useful pitchers. So it isn't all bad. Obviously there are serious concerns about the team and organization in general, but there are also still reasons to be--if not optimistic--then hopeful for next year and beyond.
    11 points
  15. I would like to see MLB deaden the ball more and put further limits on the number of pitchers you can have on your roster. These have to happen together. If a team needed to get through a game with 2-3 pitchers instead of 4-5, the pitchers would have to be more efficient and pitch to contact. They could pitch to contact more easily if they weren’t worried so much about homers. The biggest problem in MLB, IMO, is there are too many pitches where nothing happens. Walks and strikeouts both stink. Throw the ball over the plate and let them put it in play. I don’t think this would happen overnight, but I’d like to see the game move in that direction.
    10 points
  16. I don't think those are handicapped seating.. so that's a good sign.
    10 points
  17. From a fan's point of view (mine), it just seem like the Angels are a disorganized mess. Before the season we were fed lines about defense and the importance of a good catcher, and playing 1985 style baseball, but not much about the season reflected any of that. Then came the injuries (lots of them and to key players) and what appeared to be miss-information about how long players would be out, etc. Along the way, we learned the scouting department was reduced dramatically and then we had issues come to light in the media with how the minor leaguers were supposedly being treated. The Skaggs stuff resurfaced. Calloway happened. Renigfo's issues made the news. The trade deadline came and went and players many thought would be traded for prospects - didn't get traded for one reason or another. The inactivity was alarming to some. From a fan's point of view - there's nothing happening that gives us much confidence that things will get better. When one of the season's bright spots was releasing Albert Pujols, you know it's not a great season. In the back drop is this belief/notion that Arte meddles with the front office. There's the poor track record of acquiring top of the rotation pitching via free agency and the lack of developing that from within (although that seems to be a bit better now). We watched the defense implode. We watched the pitching suffer. We saw more new names in the lineup than we can ever remember. At times it felt like the Angels were having open try-outs for guys who were playing in some beer league. You know your team sucks when Jack Mayfield makes the most headlines of late... Just for fun, we saw Darron Sutton dismissed and a guy with zero previous play by play experience fill in for a mid-season acquisition - who spends his weekends announcing football games (I can't even remember his name). We spent game after game, wondering what in the heck Joe Maddon is doing. Granted, we do that with every manager - but this season it seemed like that was happening more than ever before. I'm probably leaving some stuff out - but it's enough to make us all wonder... "What's next?" I'm still a fan, but my interest in the team was less than I can ever remember. It seems like uncertainty surrounds the future. That's not fun.
    10 points
  18. McTheKnife

    Colin Powell ded

    Wow! Wake up call for me. I, too, have Multiple Myeloma. I've been getting too comfortable around people and family that aren't masked and/or vaccinated. Even though I'm fully vaccinated,,my medical specialists have warned me time & again to act like I'm not. The antibody protection the vaccine produces dissipates quickly with those that are immunocomprised. I'm currently in 2 studies (John Hopkins & Leukemia - Lymphoma Society) that measures antibodies produced by the vaccines at different time stages. My 1st Pfizer gave me a small amount of antibodies but the 2nd one kicked it up to >250 U/ul. However at my 6 month lab draw it had fallen to 64 U/uL. Fortunately, my 3rd vaccine kicked way up to >2500 U/uL I feel safer from Covid but not entirely. Let's face it, we're all gonna die of something down the road. I just don't want it to be Covid, something I can control if I rationally approach it. Stay safe everyone!!
    9 points
  19. 9 points
  20. One of the things I don't like about Maddon is that he seems to love the spotlight. Mike Scioscia never did. Whenever the networks did interviews in the dugout - Scioscia always had one of his coaches do it instead of him. I know that has nothing to do with managing, but it says something about the difference between the two. Maddon is the better interview and some fans love that stuff. It's one of the reasons I never liked Tommy Lasorda... because he's another guy who loved to make it about him. I could go on and on about why I like Mike Scioscia... from the way he handled the Nick Adenhart tragedy to way he dealt with problem players like Jose Guillen. And when he had his kind of players - he won. When he lost his autonomy, the Angels started to lose. It's funny because Maddon talked about playing 1985 style baseball... well, that was Mike Scioscia style baseball. Put the ball in play, force the issue on the bases, etc.
    9 points
  21. Maybe Dylan Hernandez can translate.
    9 points
  22. Swanson was the one guy I was sure would get canned once Perry got acclimated with the system. Nothing against the job Swanson did, more a case of believing the Minasian/Tamin combo would want to bring in their own guy. This is also the reason I said I didn't view the 2021 draft as Perry's - it was still Eppler's guys, and whatever scouting happened was done with those scouting principles in place. Looking forward to seeing who they bring in and how they handle the draft next season.
    8 points
  23. Well, pujols was only 17 back then.
    8 points
  24. Going to another Angels fan site is like going out with Rosie O’Donnell when you have Kate Beckinsale waiting at home.
    8 points
  25. We have a thousand pujols threads, and will likely have 1000 more. But the reddit post blew me away. Pujols was here longer than ww1 and 2 combined. And gave us less WAR, and equal sadness. And we likely paid him more than a few countries spent that actually participated in the war.
    8 points
  26. It's funny. I was reading through this thread and had ZERO thought about looking at the date of the thread. This quote is really spot on. Those responses have weathered the sands of time. I'll tell you who I'm excited for right now.....Patrick Sandoval. He has a nasty slider, and an above average change up. He has a pretty good fastball that runs in to right handed hitters. Sad to see the injury bug got him this year. I hope he can remain healthy and not suffer the "Kelvin Escobar" career path. I'm looking forward to seeing what Sandoval can do.
    8 points
  27. wow, Pujols is 4 years younger than me but looks at least 50. weird!
    8 points
  28. 8 points
  29. Thanks for taking the time to do the GDTs @jsnpritchett, also @beatlesrule and @Chuckster70 (and others?). You helped a lazy dude like myself to not have to look up lineup and start time info every single game.
    8 points
  30. I will be there on Sunday for the season finale in Seattle. Go Halos!
    8 points
  31. 8 points
  32. There is a lot going right. We have the two best baseball players on the planet. A market that can support a high payroll. And a good young core of Walsh, Adell and Marsh on the position player side of things, and Rodriguez, Suarez, Sandoval, Canning and Detmers on the pitching side. This is a excellent foundation to start with.
    8 points
  33. 8 points
  34. I'm probably reading into this way too much as I tend to do, but this feels like more than Joe's boiled over frustrations suddenly coming out. And frankly, I don't think this is him calling out Arte. It could be, but I don't think so. I think it's him calling out Minasian. And again, this is pure conjecture but this reeks of some unfavorable conversations happening behind the scenes as to why this team is where it is this year and Joe taking to the media to sort of cover his butt. Or maybe those conversations didn't actually happen directly but I still think he's covering his butt. Also, it's become clear to me that Maddon is a 'window' guy. Maybe that's the wrong term but in essence I think he was brought in to coach a championship roster and the team was forced to use more players from the minors than pretty much every other team. Granted, injuries have played a big role in that but to me he's sort of complaining that going to war with guys like Bundy and Quintana and Canning was a setup for failure. So maybe to some degree he is calling out Arte. He's actually not wrong to complain if that's what Arte promised. Even at full health this roster wasn't likely making the playoffs. Or at best they'd be about where Seattle and Oakland are situated looking up I know this has been beaten to death but we've never really gotten a great answer about why the defense has been so bad yet it's not like we've had a roster of typically poor defenders. Maybe @Jeff Fletcher can ask some provocative questions (OOOh. he said provocative). At the end of the day I still don't think the level of talent on this roster matches what they're getting out of them. And to me, a chunk of that is on Maddon. Right now I feel that the roster actually has to be all that much better in order to overcome Joe's deficiencies. But maybe that's just me.
    8 points
  35. 8 points
  36. My favorite part about this.. All the people that deluded themselves believing Maddon was this super manager who would turn things around are probably going to line up and praise him. Ohhh, he's calling it how it is, he's calling out Arte.. Maddon had all the talent in the world in Chicago.
    8 points
  37. WicketMaiden

    Uniform idea

    It looks like somebody's Mom made it because they couldn't afford to buy a real one.
    7 points
  38. 7 points
  39. I agree, although I think that whole WAR salary thing is overdone, and really doesn't apply to closers and high leverage relievers in general. You can't accurately measure by WAR the value of a lights-out reliever ending a rally. I've gone on record that they should offer him the QO because: 1. He probably won't accept it. 2. If he does, worst-case scenario and the Angels overpay him by $4-5M for one year ($18.9M vs the $14-15M+ he'll likely cost). 3. If he doesn't, and doesn't resign with the Angels, they get a compensation pick (if the draft works the same next year).
    7 points
  40. Right, so we plug the hole at SS with Fletch. Leaving us...with a hole at 2B.
    7 points
  41. I don't give a fuck.
    7 points
  42. True Grich

    T-shirts

    Went to bed in a Foreigner t-shirt and woke up with double vision.
    7 points
  43. They better be able to afford him. Right now the only two relievers I trust is Iglesias and Warren.
    7 points
  44. Blarg

    Your car

    Duck tape, shovel, package of lime.
    7 points
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