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Angels' Jered Weaver isn't setting any speed traps


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Right-hander, who gives up two hits and one run over six innings against Cincinnati in opener, doesn't throw that hard anymore but baffles hitters with deception and pinpoint control.

 

By Bill Shaikin, Los Angeles Times

April 2, 2013

CINCINNATI—
— Of all the numbers dotted on a scorecard and drizzled around its margins as opening day extended into opening night, the most compelling number for the Angels might be this one:

Number of times Jered Weaver hit 90 mph: zero.

 
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Its actually a bit worrisome. As Jeff Sullivan said, Weaver might be the type of pitcher that doesn't have a lot of room for error. I honestly wouldn't be surprised to see him morph back into something akin to the #2-3 starter that he was earlier in his career, as soon as this year. I'm not betting either way, just saying that it could happen.

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Its actually a bit worrisome. As Jeff Sullivan said, Weaver might be the type of pitcher that doesn't have a lot of room for error. I honestly wouldn't be surprised to see him morph back into something akin to the #2-3 starter that he was earlier in his career, as soon as this year. I'm not betting either way, just saying that it could happen.

 

Who is Jeff Sullivan and who cares what he thinks?

 

Some of Greg Maddux's best seasons was sporting a fastball in the high 80's. Weaver's no hitter last year, his average fastball for the night 89 MPH for the game.

 

I'll take a smart pitcher over a strong arm and nothing between the ears any day of the week. 

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Its actually a bit worrisome. As Jeff Sullivan said, Weaver might be the type of pitcher that doesn't have a lot of room for error. I honestly wouldn't be surprised to see him morph back into something akin to the #2-3 starter that he was earlier in his career, as soon as this year. I'm not betting either way, just saying that it could happen.

 

This is why the construction of the rest of our starting rotation is very scary: 

 

Here's our rotation now

 

Weaver (Velocity is concerning)

Wilson (back from surgery)

Blanton (marine layer is his friend)

Vargas (marine layer may not be enough)

Hanson (poor-man's Weaver)

 

 

I actually did predict at the beginning of the season that Weaver would take a step back, and CJ Wilson would pitch the way he did the first half last year thereby becoming the team Ace. That's just a wild ass-guess*.

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Sorry - I forgot that we're not supposed to bring a diversity of viewpoints, not all of them homerish, to the table. Apologies!

 

You can bring any opinion you want to the table here, but be prepared to get called out when you quote a Mariners fan perspective of Jered Weaver on an Angels Website. 

 

I know who Jeff Sullivan is. Can't say I agree with some of his Blog material, but funny guy. 

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Who is Jeff Sullivan and who cares what he thinks?

 

Some of Greg Maddux's best seasons was sporting a fastball in the high 80's. Weaver's no hitter last year, his average fastball for the night 89 MPH for the game.

 

I'll take a smart pitcher over a strong arm and nothing between the ears any day of the week. 

 

Jered Weaver is not Greg Maddux, who is one of the twenty or so greater starting pitchers in baseball history.

 

But even Maddux dropped a notch when he lost a bit on his fastball. From about age 33 on he wasn't the same pitcher he was from about age 26-32.

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Jered Weaver is not Greg Maddux, who is one of the twenty or so greater starting pitchers in baseball history.

 

But even Maddux dropped a notch when he lost a bit on his fastball. From about age 33 on he wasn't the same pitcher he was from about age 26-32.

 

So he wasn't the same pitcher later in his career as he was in the prime of his career?  That's not unusual. 

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You can bring any opinion you want to the table here, but be prepared to get called out when you quote a Mariners fan perspective of Jered Weaver on an Angels Website. 

 

Oh please, Chuck. All Sullivan said is that Weaver might not have a lot of room for error. The rest was me. This isn't about playing sides but trying to understand the situation clearly. I obviously want Weaver to continue to be great, but I'm merely voicing the POSSIBILITY that he might take a step down if his velocity doesn't pick back up. Not everyone can be Greg Maddux.

 

That said, I still expect Weaver to be very good for the next 5+ years, and I'm not even writing off continued excellent. Just voicing a possibility here.

 

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Oh please, Chuck. All Sullivan said is that Weaver might not have a lot of room for error. The rest was me. This isn't about playing sides but trying to understand the situation clearly. I obviously want Weaver to continue to be great, but I'm merely voicing the POSSIBILITY that he might take a step down if his velocity doesn't pick back up. Not everyone can be Greg Maddux.

 

That said, I still expect Weaver to be very good for the next 5+ years, and I'm not even writing off continued excellent. Just voicing a possibility here.

 

 

Fair enough! 

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I guess we just look at this differently.  You look at it as Weaver is losing speed on his fastball and is therefore regressing.  I look at it as Weaver has purposely slowed down his fastball to become a different type of pitcher than the one that first came to the big leagues.

 

I personally believe if Weaver wanted every fastball to be 90+ mph, it would be, but that is not what he wants to do.

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Early in the season, cold weather climate, fb speeds are going to be down a couple clicks. Weaver is not a pitcher that relies on his fb speed to get outs. His game is control and deception. He's also a smart pitcher that avoids being predictable. I am not concerned. 

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Oh please, Chuck. All Sullivan said is that Weaver might not have a lot of room for error. The rest was me. This isn't about playing sides but trying to understand the situation clearly. I obviously want Weaver to continue to be great, but I'm merely voicing the POSSIBILITY that he might take a step down if his velocity doesn't pick back up. Not everyone can be Greg Maddux.

 

That said, I still expect Weaver to be very good for the next 5+ years, and I'm not even writing off continued excellent. Just voicing a possibility here.

 

 

 

So now you have yourself covered no matter what happens with Weaver.  Sweet.

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