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Torridd

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To my knowledge the teams do not have anything to do with the testing.  It's between the league offices and the players union.  The team would only be contacted if there is a problem requiring investigation or punishment.

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Q. Who administers MLB's drug program?

A. A four-member Health Policy Advisory Committee (HPAC). The Commissioner's Office and the MLBPA each appoint two members, a lawyer and a doctor with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of substance abuse. If the HPAC deadlocks 2-2 on an issue, the two doctors on the Committee jointly appoint a third doctor to cast the deciding vote. Members of the HPAC serve indefinite terms and can be removed at any time by the party which appointed them, so they're not likely to stray too far from the wishes of their sponsors.

You can download a PDF of the drug policy here: http://www.steroidsinbaseball.net/cba/jda_02_06.pdf

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I'm just wondering if an organization rallied around its players would that network be able to manipulate or deflect testing in any way.

If you can get the help of an experienced team of experts you can get around all the tests.

USADA and WADA who are both considered the most thoroughly tested organizations never caught lance armstrong despite giving out hundreds of tests throughout his career.

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On one of the first sections of the Mitchell report, page 91, there is mention of a Red Sox player. It might not have been someone famous but it still was there. The 2003 Survey were hundreds of MLB players were on the "List", including David Ortiz and Manny Ramirez. Although MLBPA clearly stated that everyone on that list wasn't necessarily on the list for performing enhancing drugs. 

 

The league really needs to get with the times though and start really making the push towards better and more efficient testing. And harsher penalties.

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On one of the first sections of the Mitchell report, page 91, there is mention of a Red Sox player. It might not have been someone famous but it still was there. The 2003 Survey were hundreds of MLB players were on the "List", including David Ortiz and Manny Ramirez. Although MLBPA clearly stated that everyone on that list wasn't necessarily on the list for performing enhancing drugs. 

 

The league really needs to get with the times though and start really making the push towards better and more efficient testing. And harsher penalties.

 

 

 page 91 eh? the idea is that anyone in a team executive capacity has no business leading a serious investigation about the entire body of mlb players. total conflict of interest.

a good analogy would be our current securitys and exchange commission. led by and staffed with former bankers and wall street hacks with current financial and personal interest in the very thing they are supposed to be  investigating.

 roid head manny went on to play mlb for quite some time and sign another lucrative contract long after the report was presented to congress.

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