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jobs/professions


wopphil

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I am always curious to learn about people's jobs/professions. If anyone feels comfortable sharing:

What do you guys/gals do for work? What do you like most about your jobs/professions? What do you like least? For you older people, what advice would you give younger workers? What would you have done differently?

Do any of you wish you had taken more risk in your professions? Like maybe started your own business? Or pursued an opportunity that would have required relocation?

What are the best employment related decions you have made? What are the worst?

Any of you feel like you altogether chose the wrong profession?

Anyone change professions in the middle of their life? If you had a spouse and kids, how did you make that happen?

I'd love to hear what you all have to say.

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Started my own business back in 2005, a medical management company. We set up pharmacies and IV treatment programs in doctors offices. Our specialty is the treatment of Lyme Disease. Slow but steady growth in the nine years we have been in business. Offices located in NJ, NYC, Portsmouth NH, and Cumberland RI.

Started another business last year along with 2 other partners. An all natural, 100% organic insect repellent. We have versions for humans, dogs, and cats. Building a brand is a learning experience. Getting product on store shelves is quite a challenge. We currently sell from our online store, as well as 100+ independant stores. www.ticks-n-all.com

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Sr. Project Manager - Health Care Reform enrollment and billing for a major health insurance company.

 

I manage a team of 20 people in charge of the Obamacare implementation and support for enrollment and billing.  Managing such a big team is a pain in the ass.  Team went from 6-20 in the last couple months.

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I am a Registered Nurse - specifically Director of Nursing Services in a state correctional institution. I schedule, supervise and evaluate about 25 people. One of the biggest challenges is managing a department that has not had a staffing increase despite the doubling of the capacity of the facility we cover, and having a budget that is about 15 percent less than it was four years ago.

 

Mine was a mid-life career change. Had a BA in psychology, which got me a dead-end desk job. Finished my RN just before I turned 40, worked in mental health, long term care and rehabilitative nursing before winding up in corrections. Ironically I had a long career in corrections working as an officer, case manager, researcher and for the parole board before going to school. My goal in going to nursing school was to get out of corrections. Funny how that doubled back on me. I took a per diem job with the Nevada Department of Corrections just to pick up a few hours. That was over 13 years ago.

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jr high school history teacher. this is my 31st year.

not really in a mood to give out a lot of personal information these days. nothing personal, phil.

I hear you dude, I don't expect anyone to do that. I just wanted to know generally what types of things people like/ dislike about their jobs, etc. What career advice they have, mistakes they have made, things of that sort.

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What do you guys/gals do for work?

 

Executive Director of an HR company specializing in servicing sole proprietors and logistics companies. 

 

What do you like most about your jobs/professions?

 

Autonomy and business development. 

 

What do you like least?

 

Government interference. 

 

For you older people, what advice would you give younger workers?

 

Show up earlier than your co-workers. Stay longer than your co-workers. Work harder than your co-workers. For every one thing you criticize someone for, make sure you provide four pieces of positive feedback.

 

What would you have done differently?

 

Gotten started in the professional world earlier in life. I didn't get a "real" job until I was 26. 

Do any of you wish you had taken more risk in your professions? Like maybe started your own business? Or pursued an opportunity that would have required relocation?

 

Nope. 

What are the best employment related decions you have made? What are the worst?

 

Good question. Not sure. I work to live. I don't live to work. I let that guide my decision making process.

Any of you feel like you altogether chose the wrong profession?

 

Nope.

Anyone change professions in the middle of their life? If you had a spouse and kids, how did you make that happen?

 

Probably not at the moment but perhaps in the future. 
 

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For you older people, what advice would you give younger workers?

 

Show up earlier than your co-workers. Stay longer than your co-workers. Work harder than your co-workers. For every one thing you criticize someone for, make sure you provide four pieces of positive feedback.

 

This is great.  Work hard, leave the negativity and pettiness to others.  Only worry about the things you can control, learn from your mistakes.  Know your strengths and weaknesses, only commit to that which you can accomplish.  Stay positive and confident in your abilities.  Don't be afraid to ask for help.

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This is great.  Work hard, leave the negativity and pettiness to others.  Only worry about the things you can control, learn from your mistakes.  Know your strengths and weaknesses, only commit to that which you can accomplish.  Stay positive and confident in your abilities.  Don't be afraid to ask for help.

 

Good stuff.

 

Don't kiss ass, but ask a lot of "why" questions about the business, what other departments do, etc.

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Senior Applications Environment Engineer at a premiere movie channel that starts with an S and ends with a Z.  Don't let the title full you.  They throw out titles like giving away candy.  

 

What I like about my job?  I get paid well, I have great benefits and a great 401K plan.  I can work from home on occasion.  I get most of my cable paid for along with my internet.  

 

What I don't like about my job?  My boss.  Everything I like makes up for the disdain I have for my boss.  

 

I wish I would have saved more when I was younger but I am catching up quick.  

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Police Officer, City of Long Beach.  Just passed 20 years on the job, 25 if you count my Lifeguard time.

 

I LOVE my job!  I get to make a difference in peoples' lives every day.  I love waving to little kids as we drive by, and have been known to stop on occasion to shoot hoops, toss a football, or skateboard with the kids.  I love that I'm the guy who can stand-up to bullies/thugs for the people who can't. I love going to court and pointing-out the A-hole who deserves more time than he/she will ever get.

 

I don't like seeing my friends get hurt trying to solve other peoples' problems, especially if it's a family-type call where the victims suddenly side with their supposed suspect.  I don't like the fact that video starts at the end of a use-of-force by an Officer, missing the opening statement by the suspect.  I don't like the fact that my bosses are more interested in politicking, than backing-up their own people.

 

I am well-paid, and will have a decent retirement.  But, I have yet to see the raise that we are entitled too.  Every contract, we give away more and more of our salary and retirement.  Be careful what you vote for, these are the people who will be responding to your calls.  Every time we concede more at contract time, potential great Officers decide to make more money for less headache elsewhere.

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For you older people, what advice would you give younger workers? 

 

One thing that too few people do: If you present your boss with a problem, also propose a potential solution. Far too many people are content to point out problems and then walk away. When the boss comes up with a solution, that person invariably finds something wrong with it as well. If you give your boss a possible answer, even if it isn't what is eventually adopted your boss will know that you are actually thinking about the job and how it works rather than just finding fault and pointing it out.

 

When you move into supervision and management, take advantage of the talent around you, and solicit input from your subordinates. You get a lot more buy-in on changes that you make if the people most affected by them have had some say in the development process. This doesn't mean that the employees run the show, but who knows the line level job better than someone who is doing it? Asking questions and soliciting input beforehand can greatly reduce the need to make adjustments later.

 

Also remember that each member of your staff is a person. If you can possibly make an adjustment to help an employee get through a difficult situation, further his/her education or just have an easier time dealing with the job, do so. People who feel respected and who aren't always told "no" are happier and more productive. Sure, you have to have enough people on duty to perform the job, and there will always be a "bean counter" aspect to management, but that isn't the be-all and end-all of supervising people.

 

I have worked for people who managed with what I call a "spreadsheet mentality". We need X number of people here on day Y, and it doesn't matter who I plug in where or whose life I disrupt in the process. I once had a supervisor who switched me to night shift for a month. His way of telling me was to put it on the schedule he posted on the bulletin board as he was going out the door to start a two-week vacation. I would have been fine with it had I been given a heads-up, but apparently he didn't believe it worth his while to tell me that it was coming. There will be times when you have to make emergency adjustments, but those are the exception. Because I treat my staff respectfully and I accommodate them whenever it is reasonable, I get no pushback when emergency situations occur. Some employees even come in as soon as they hear and ask me what they can do and offer to alter their schedules.

Edited by Vegas Halo Fan
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I am still young but I have been in management for almost a decade now.  One thing I learned quickly is you are only as good as the people working for you.  I also learned that while it is important to show compassion and keep up morale, you must be stern and consistent.  As soon as the people working for you get lazy or take advantage of you, you have lost them and will have major problems.  It is a difficult balance and might sound heartless but apathy is very important when it comes to management.

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I've drifted through just about every part of the military aviation industry.

 

Don't drop anchor. If you're willing to travel a whole new world opens up for you.

 

It's worth the time to pack and bring your own lunch.

 

Save 5-10% from every check. Pretend it doesn't exist.

 

At the end of the day nobody remembers how good your excuse was for not getting something done.

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What do you guys/gals do for work?

- I fall under the entrepreneur category......I've been self employed since 2007. I've been in multiple fields and done multiple facets, but mostly owned or ran companies or worked on startups.

 

What do you like most about your jobs/professions?

- Probably freedom and not having to really check in with anyone. I also simply love building and creating. Implementing and directly changing or growing a business from scratch is pretty rewarding.

 

What do you like least?

- Paychecks aren't guaranteed. If I get into a new industry I have to rely on the competence of whoever I'm partnering with. Like any other work or business field, dealing with shitty employees or business partners. As I get older I value time more and one of the draw backs is I can't leave my work at the office. I'm constantly on call, have to deal with issues at all hours, and everyday take my work home with me. 

 

For you older people, what advice would you give younger workers?

- Get educated and be passionate about whatever you do. I'd recommend saving your money even more than you think you do. One think I strived for and really try to press upon people is to be assertive. Most people have an employee mentality and wait until a problem happens or to be told what to do. Finish your tasks then ask your higher ups what you can do to help the team/company succeed and take on more responsibility. One thing I have always done as an "employee" at regular gigs is assert myself in the work place as someone with a great work ethic, competence, and create a go-getter attitude to help the company accomplish its goals. Once I'm on the companies radar, within a week or so, I would seek a meeting with a higher up and let them know how happy I am, but  what can I do to best succeed with the company or that I'd love to move up within the company and what would they recommend my best course of action be. You'd be surprised how helpful they are with you being successful....again, most people have an employee mentality and simply want to clock in and clock out doing the bare minimum to stay employed.

 

 

What would you have done differently?

- I would have taken school and education more seriously. I'm glad I'm not one of those dudes that got a degree in some field that I grew to dislike, but I also find the piece of paper to be important in trays work climate. I also would have saved more when times were really good.....always save.

 

Do any of you wish you had taken more risk in your professions?

- I've probably been as risky as possible, I actually don't like it because of the uncertainty. But I wouldn't change a thing and if I was to ever fail could say I went down swinging instead of rotting in some cubicle always wondering "what if.."

 

Like maybe started your own business?

- N/A.....these have been a blast, even the failed ones.

 

Or pursued an opportunity that would have required relocation?

- Not really.

What are the best employment related decions you have made?

- Being assertive and moving and progressing further in companies as I mentioned above in normal 9 to 5 settings. My very first company I created a protocol and safety net for risk mitigation that was copied and instituted at the credit union I worked for......to my knowledge it's become kind of a normal business practice for a lot of brokerages.

 

What are the worst?

- I've started a couple companies under funded. I've also started companies in new industries with really bad business partners or gave them too much credit for creating the companies success. I've also invested in projects with too much of my bankroll on the line.

 
Any of you feel like you altogether chose the wrong profession?

- Eh. No one is ever a kid and says they want to do what I do.....I suppose some kids say they want to run or own companies. I've had a great life and professional career, even with the ups and downs. Part of me wishes I would settle down in a particular sector and part of me wishes I had a solid 9 to 5 and had that stability........but the grass isn't greener. Being where I'm at now I'd yearn for stability. But being in a stable fortune 500 company I'd want to seek out a new challenge or run my own ship. There are always second guessing aspects.

Anyone change professions in the middle of their life?

- I'm constantly doing this.

 

If you had a spouse and kids, how did you make that happen?

N/A. However, a big key is to have a very supportive significant other. I have a quasi-fiance that is very supportive whether she has to roll with some down times or my crazy schedule.....plus, I'm overly career oriented so that's tops on my life totem pole. You need that rock at home that understands and is supportive of your business goals.

Edited by Brandon
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I tend bar and drive a package delivery car for UPS. Will be going full time when my seniority date is valid enough. If I would do things differently, I'd go back to school. Full time top rate is 90k here in Jersey, but if I would have stayed in college, I could probably make that or more without busting my ass 12 hours a day eating breakfast and lunch in my truck, lifting 70+ pound packages everywhere and up flights of steps. 

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