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Hector Santiago & Tyler Skaggs Thoughts & Scouting Reports


Chuckster70

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Post what you got here on these two, as it's tough to go through that entire Trumbo Chatter thread.

 

From Rotoworld:

 

Angels acquired LHP Hector Santiago and LHP Tyler Skaggs in a three-team trade with the White Sox and Diamondbacks.

 

It's a much-needed influx of talented young pitching for the Angels, who had one of the worst staffs in the major leagues in 2013. Santiago, who turns 26 years old later this month, posted a promising 3.56 ERA and 137/72 K/BB ratio across 149 innings this past season for Chicago. Those numbers have the potential to get better in Anaheim -- a much more pitcher-friendly environment.

 

Angels acquired LHP Tyler Skaggs and LHP Hector Santiago in a three-team trade with the White Sox and Diamondbacks.

 

Anaheim set its sights on Skaggs when the Mark Trumbo trade talks began and a three-team negotiation allowed for the acquisition. Skaggs saw a dip in velocity in 2013 and the results weren't pretty, but a year ago he was considered one of the top pitching prospects in baseball and a move out of Arizona could be exactly what the 22-year-old left-hander needed. He should be in the Angels' Opening Day rotation and has the potential to carry considerable fantasy value.

 

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I think Skaggs is the real prize of this trade. He's just 22 with 6 years of club control and a ton of upside. Santiago is good in that he is versatile and has pretty good raw stuff. At worst I think he could be a solid reliever but I expect him to be a starter where he'll add the most value.

I see Santiago as a left handed Santana. I think he can definitely hold down a spot in this rotation.

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Hector Santiago from FutureSox.com:

"Scouting report

 

The New Jersey born left-hander showed what a difference a pitch can make when his newly developed screwball led to a breakout 2011 that included a pair of July appearances in the Majors. Before that he was a middling reliever with a good low 90s fastball that gave him a lot of strikeouts, but not enough else. The Sox made him a starter in 2011 and he hit the ground running in Winston-Salem, earning a promotion after just eight starts. The success continued in Birmingham and that led to a temporary big league call-up. Santiago has mediocre control and needs a third quality pitch if he is going to start in the bigs. If he doesn't he could wind up as a solid reliever where his velocity would play up.

Major League Outlook: No. 3/4 starter or set-up man
ETA: MLB ready" 

 

Tyler Skaggs from BaseballProspectNation.com

Body (6-3, 195): Tall and lean with a well-proportioned body. Ideal pitchers frame. Good strength and good athleticism.

Delivery/Mechanics: The arm works well. He accelerates through is delivery, getting a little “herky-jerky” when he separates his hands and moves toward the plate. The effort adds some deception but can cause his command to waver at times. Overall solid but not ideal.
Fastball (FB) Velocity (Wind-up): High – 94, Low – 87, Average 89-91, Grade –50/50
Fastball (FB) Velocity (Stretch): 
High – 93, Low 87, Average 90-91, Grade – 50/50
Fastball (FB) Movement:
  Natural run on the ball that helps it miss the barrel of the bat even when not located well. Good angle on pitches thanks to height and high-three quarters slot.. Grade – 60/60
Overall Fastball:
 FB plays up because of angle and natural movement. Average pure velocity but plus overall pitch with quality movement. Uses pitch well and pitches off it during starts. Grade – 60/60
Curveball (CB):
 Good overhand break that’s aided by his arm slot. Stays on top of the ball well and snaps it off consistently, generating tight spin and good depth to the break. True plus pitch that has swing-and-miss capability. Reliable pitch in tight spots. Grade –60/60
Change-Up (CH):
 Shows average CH with some regularity but will lose feel at times and abandon pitch. Has good arm speed and solid fade. Helps against RHH and can be effective when down against LHH. Quality pitch that needs consistency. Grade – 40/50
Control:
  Throws strikes consistently. Effort and acceleration in delivery don’t typically hamper control, as it works for him and he’s adapted to it. Can throw strikes with all three pitches. Easy present plus command and good probability for plus-plus when he settles in at the big-league level and stops overthrowing in that situation. Grade – 60/70
Command:
  Shows hints of plus command but more consistently below-average and easier to project at an average level. Solid athleticism. Gets too fine at times and will need to adapt to the discerning eye of big league hitters. Grade – 40/50

Summation: Very close to big league ready. Quality FB that plays up because of movement and strike-throwing ability. Likes to challenge with FB and will work inside to LHH. Needs to consistently establish FB early in starts. CB is easy plus pitch of swing-and-miss variety. Gives him two plus pitches and an exceptional base to work from. CH has some promise and should be quality third pitch, but not devastating. Will throw strikes consistently but must develop better command against big-league hitters. Athleticism and control profile suggest it should come soon. Potential number two starter with well-rounded profile. Very little left to prove in Triple-A; just needs to settle into the big league rotation. High-quality prospect.

Edited by Angels_Baseball
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From Baseball Prospectus....

 

1. Tyler Skaggs
Position: LHP
DOB: 07/13/1991
Height/Weight: 6’3’’ 195 lbs.
Bats/Throws: L/L
Drafted/Acquired: 1st round, 2009 draft (Angels), Santa Monica High School (Santa Monica, CA)
2012 Stats: 5.83 ERA (29.1 IP, 30 H, 21 K, 13 BB) at major-league level
The Tools: 5+ FB; 6+ CB; 5 CH

What Happened in 2012: An impressive run through the upper minors left Skaggs standing on a major league mound at the end of the season, where the 21-year-old held his own on the biggest stage.

Strengths: Underrated pitchability; clean delivery; maintains a good line to the plate; good strike-throwing ability; fastball is crisp in the 89-92 range; can get more and attack north/south; excellent up and down curveball; major-league bat-missing pitch; changeup plays at 5; can flash more, with good arm-side fade; mature approach.

Weaknesses: Fastball is table setter, not big plus offering; command needs to be sharper; can live too loose in the zone; can push changeup and lose deception.

Overall Future Potential: 6; no. 2/3 starter

Explanation of Risk: Low risk; arsenal can play at major-league level; ready for rotation spot.

Fantasy Future: Has strikeout potential because of sharp 12-to-6 curveball; walks fine line with hard contact and lack of dominant fastball; body to log innings; prototypical mid-rotation arm if everything clicks.

The Year Ahead: Skaggs will look to take another developmental step forward, earning a rotation spot out of camp and living up to the hype. If he can locate the fastball early, working low in the zone, he can set up hitters for the big bender, which should allow the southpaw to miss bats at the highest level. If the changeup can join the curveball as a steady plus offering, the sky is the limit for the young arm.

 

From Baseball America...

 

Background: Skaggs was a three-sport star at Santa Monica (Calif.) High, where his mother Debbie was the longtime softball coach. He eventually gave up basketball and football to focus on baseball and pitched his way into the supplemental first round of the 2009 draft. The Diamondbacks hoped to take him with the 41st overall selection, but the Angels beat them to the punch at No. 40. He was part of a strong Angels draft class that already has sent Mike Trout, Skaggs, Garrett Richards, Patrick Corbin and Drew Carpenter to the majors. Skaggs signed for $1 million just before the Aug. 17 deadline, giving up a Cal State Fullerton commitment. Arizona finally got him a year later, acquiring him as the centerpiece of a July 2010 trade for Dan Haren. The Diamondbacks also received Corbin, Rafael Rodriguez and Joe Saunders. Skaggs’ fastball velocity and prospect stock have risen in each of his two full seasons with Arizona, and he represented the organization in the last two Futures Games. He ranked as the No. 3 prospect in the Double-A Southern League and No. 4 in the Triple-A Pacific Coast League in 2012, going a combined 9-6, 2.87 with 116 strikeouts in 123 innings before making his major league debut on Aug. 22. He beat the Marlins in his big league start and pitched well in his next two before he tired and his velocity dropped in his next three. The Diamondbacks shut him down for the season after the Padres beat him on Sept. 20.

 

Scouting Report: The jewel of Skaggs’ repertoire is a sharp 12-to-6 curveball that he throws in the mid-70s. It features late, sharp break and is regarded as one of the best in the minors. He set it up with a fastball that ranges from 89-94 mph and features some armside run. He delivers his heater with good downhill plane and spots it to both sides of the plate. He throws in the low 90s more consistently than he ever has, and he also has improved his fastball command as well. Skaggs’ changeup gives him a potential third plus pitch, but he needs to trust it more. It arrives at 78-80 mph, has some fade and plays well off his fastball. He can dominate hitters when all three pitches are working for him. Skaggs has smooth, easy mechanics and uses a high three-quarters arm slot. His athleticism allows him to repeat his delivery and consistently command his pitches. He also stands out for his composure on the mound and his idea of what he needs to do with each hitter. He holds runners well with a strong pickoff move, permitting just five steals in eight attempts last year. He didn’t give up a single stolen base in his six major league starts and he uses his athleticism to field his position well.

 

The Future: Skaggs will only be 21 when spring training rolls around, but he has an excellent chance of earning a spot in the Arizona rotation when camp breaks. There’s still some projection remaining in his lanky frame, so there’s a chance he could continue to get stronger and add more velocity to his fastball. One of the top lefthanded pitching prospects in the game, he projects as a No. 2 starter.

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Why did Skaggs lose velocity?  That's the most concerning thing for me as he's only 22.  Was there a strain or an injury somewhere along the line?  I read that he went from hitting the mid 90's all the way down the the high 80's by the end of last year.

Per MLBN, that's what some scouts were worried about and was a definite question mark to them.

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I think the "mid-90's fastball" thing is a little overblown. He can hit 94-95, but that's not typically where he sits. It does seem like there was a drop in velocity but I wouldn't attribute it to more than normal fatigue for a 22 year old.

 

To be honest tdawg, I've never personally seen him hit that high on the radar, but heard from scouts he has.

 

Back in 2010, here's our scouting report on him.

 

Skaggs.jpg
 
Tyler Skaggs
Position: Starting Pitcher
Height: 6'4 - Weight: 180
Bats: Left - Throws: Left
DOB: 07/13/1991
2009 Stats
Arizona (Rookie Ball): 0-0, 0.00 ERA, 7 strikeouts, 1 walk, 6 IP
Orem (Rookie Ball): 0-0, 4.50 ERA, 6 strikeouts, 1 walk, 4 IP
 
Starting the 2010, AngelsWin.com ranked Tyler Skaggs as the Angels’ #17 overall prospect. That still placed him as the third best left-handed pitcher in the organization according to AngelsWin.com and the tenth best pitcher overall. Although he is a bit less known to some of the fans, Skaggs is a local player drafted out of Santa Monica High School who was thrilled to be drafted by his favorite team. The Angels drafted the tall and projectable left-hander as a supplemental pick in the first round of the 2009 draft (#40 overall). As another talented 18-year old, the Angels have been cautious with his development so far, limiting his innings pitched. Currently playing for the Cedar Rapids Kernels, Skaggs has been posting some very good numbers that would place him in the top 20 pitchers for the Midwest League in many categories.
 
Below is our scouting report for Tyler Skaggs for the 2010 season.
 
 
Scouting Report: The Angels were happy to nab Skaggs with their 40th overall 1st round supplemental pick in the 2009 amateur draft. A projectable, lanky, 6-foot-4 and 185 pounds frame, Skaggs has an athletic build that should develop more muscle down the road without gaining much weight. In an amateur showdown between two coveted arms, Skaggs matched against Bryan Berglund and came out on top with over 50 scouts on hand. The southpaw struck out 12 batters in five innings of work, giving up just an unearned run. Skaggs posted a 1.80 ERA and fanned 13 in 10 innings of work between the AZL Angels and the Orem Owlz in his professional debut.
 
Skaggs has an old-fashioned over the top windup that gets a lot of forward movement from his back leg driving off the rubber. While his fastball sits in the 88-92 range right now, some scouts believe he'll eventually work in the low 90's consistently, hitting 95 mph. Skaggs curveball has a true over-the-top rainbow effect to it that generates swings and misses. His slider is a new pitch that is a work in progress, much like his changeup which shows flashes of being a plus offering.
 
There's a lot to be excited about when talking about Tyler Skaggs and we should see a lot from Tyler with the Orem Owlz in 2010.
 
AngelsWin.com journalist Cassy Carlson recently spent a few minutes speaking with Tyler Skaggs on May 20th, 2010 about being drafted, his experiences playing for the Kernels this year, his development as a player, and his life outside of baseball. To hear the audio interview Cassy Carslon conducted with Tyler Skaggs click on the play button below.

 

Listen to Cassy's Interview with Tyler Skaggs here

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I think the "mid-90's fastball" thing is a little overblown. He can hit 94-95, but that's not typically where he sits. It does seem like there was a drop in velocity but I wouldn't attribute it to more than normal fatigue for a 22 year old.

 

Or it's like the other common lie when people don't know why a guy is getting it.  "He was tipping his pitches."   

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Keith Law likes the deal a lot for the Angels... http://insider.espn.go.com/blog/keith-law/post?id=1695&refresh=true (Insiders only).

 

Explains his loss in velocity this way... 

 

Skaggs took a step back in 2013 as the Diamondbacks shortened his stride, resulting in a higher release point that cost him several miles per hour on his fastball and depth on his breaking ball. Lengthen him out so he finishes out over his front side again and he should be back to 90-94 mph again with the hammer he had as recently as 2012, when he projected as a potential No. 2 starter and was the best left-handed starter prospect in the game.

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Keith Law likes the deal a lot for the Angels... http://insider.espn.go.com/blog/keith-law/post?id=1695&refresh=true (Insiders only).

 

Explains his loss in velocity this way... 

 

Skaggs took a step back in 2013 as the Diamondbacks shortened his stride, resulting in a higher release point that cost him several miles per hour on his fastball and depth on his breaking ball. Lengthen him out so he finishes out over his front side again and he should be back to 90-94 mph again with the hammer he had as recently as 2012, when he projected as a potential No. 2 starter and was the best left-handed starter prospect in the game.

 

In Butcher we trust.  :wacko:

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"He holds runners well with a strong pickoff move, permitting just five steals in eight attempts last year. He didn’t give up a single stolen base in his six major league starts and he uses his athleticism to field his position well."

 

Such an underrated part of the game that the Halos were horrendous in last year, especially Hanson and Blanton. Walks and singles turned into near-automatic doubles against Hanson (allowed 21 SB 4 CS) and Blanton (allowed 17 SB 0 CS). 

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Seriously can't get over how great of a move this is.  I've been a Skaggs fan for a long time.  It doesn't matter if he sits 89, he literally has a 70-75 curve and a plus change.

 

 

I keep reading how he had a drop in velocity and not having seen him pitch at all last year I have no clue.  But PITCH/FX has his velocity the same as it was in 2012...

 

http://www.fangraphs.com/statss.aspx?playerid=10190&position=P#pitchtype

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I keep reading how he had a drop in velocity and not having seen him pitch at all last year I have no clue.  But PITCH/FX has his velocity the same as it was in 2012...

 

http://www.fangraphs.com/statss.aspx?playerid=10190&position=P#pitchtype

 

Exactly.  And like I said, and I'm sure you agree, it really is a moot point.  His secondaries are good enough.  If he lowers his BB rate, he's going to be very good.

 

 

Brooks has it pretty much the same.  The velo dips as the year goes on in 2012 and '13 (like it does most pitchers).

 

2013&minmax=ci&var=mph

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Seriously can't get over how great of a move this is.  I've been a Skaggs fan for a long time.  It doesn't matter if he sits 89, he literally has a 70-75 curve and a plus change.

 

I've watched a few of his games from last year, and his curve was less than it had been (or maybe I was falling for the narrative of his limited performance) and it was still lethal.  How far away would you say his change up is?

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New user here, been a lurker a while. Finally found something worth posting...

 

Keith Law claims the following reason for Skaggs drop in velocity.

 

Still just 22 years old, Skaggs took a step back in 2013 as the Diamondbacks shortened his stride, resulting in a higher release point that cost him several miles per hour on his fastball and depth on his breaking ball. Lengthen him out so he finishes out over his front side again and he should be back to 90-94 mph again with the hammer he had as recently as 2012, when he projected as a potential No. 2 starter and was the best left-handed starter prospect in the game. 

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