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Training help for my kid


jonhiras

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I've tried to give my son every weekend of my time to help him practice his swing. I just can't figure why on earth can't his coach teach him the right stuff considering that I'm also paying the coach to train my son an hour a day every after training. He frequently dives in over the plate every time I test throw a baseball. Any advice? I've attached a link above just to give you guys a heads up as to what I've bought recently to help my son with his issue. You think this will work?

 

Jon,

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MEET DOMINGO

Domingo Ayala was born and raised in Puerto Plata, DR sometime between 1978 and 1988 (records have not been verified). At a young age, with the influence of his cousin and longtime baseball coach, Vladimir Ayala, Domingo began to excel at the game of baseball. In the Dominican Republic, Domingo has been a 7-time Infielder of the Year and 6-time Outfielder of the Year award winner (two years overlapping when he played both SS and LF in order to hit twice in the lineup).

www.domingobeisbol.com

 

btw, there's a picture of domingo and mark trumbo on the home page.

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MEET DOMINGO

Domingo Ayala was born and raised in Puerto Plata, DR sometime between 1978 and 1988 (records have not been verified). At a young age, with the influence of his cousin and longtime baseball coach, Vladimir Ayala, Domingo began to excel at the game of baseball. In the Dominican Republic, Domingo has been a 7-time Infielder of the Year and 6-time Outfielder of the Year award winner (two years overlapping when he played both SS and LF in order to hit twice in the lineup).

www.domingobeisbol.com

 

btw, there's a picture of domingo and mark trumbo on the home page.

Ryan Spilbourghs alter ego.  Hilarious.

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reminds me of that dude many years ago that used to post up youtubes of his kid and wanted us to critique them and tell him if his kid had it.

I remember those.  He had a batting cage in his backyard.  He was living vicariously through his son.

 

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Edited by 1nutkruk
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reminds me of that dude many years ago that used to post up youtubes of his kid and wanted us to critique them and tell him if his kid had it.

 

Your posts tend to remind me of reeky, moldy, soggy rags.

 

Jon: teaching kids baseball, and how to improve their swing, is tough. Coaches in my experience, rarely know what the hell they're doing even if you're paying them, and kids don't know what the hell they're trying to say or how to apply it. When I was younger I was introduced to some of these training coaches, and they never did anything for me, mostly because it just seemed like it made me think way too much when I was at the plate. Terms like "overzealous swinging" meant nothing to me. Put a bat in your boys hands and tell him to swing at a baseball on a tee or one that's pitched. The important thing is if he can keep his eyes on it when he swings and hit it with good contact, he can play. You can stick as many of these training tools on kids when they're practicing, but when you put them in a game for the most part it all goes out the window.

 

The best advice I've ever gotten is to keep my eye on the ball, and take nice, easy, swings. Forcing strength/speed will kill technique, force you take eyes of the ball, and ruins fundamentals. There is so much evidence that shows every level up to the pros makes amazing contact when they're not trying too hard and just keep their eye on the ball. I also always stuck with the basics in the box that led me not to over-think what I was doing when at the plate. It's tough. You practice for a week and when you stand up there all of a sudden you forget everything you learned.

 

Two things that always helped me, stand pigeon toed in the box (toes pointing in towards each-other), and that forced/helped me step towards the pitcher when I took a swing. Not towards third base, not towards right field, front foot up and to the pitcher. Two, keep that back elbow up, hold it up as high as comfortable, and don't "pump" it down-then-up as the pitch comes, as that will tend to make you "drop" your shoulder, make bottom contact, and pop the ball up. The key is to just come straight down to the ball with the bat and your hands. Most important, always look for the center of the ball. Don't try to do to much, don't try to whack the snot out of it. Just keep your eyes dead center on the ball and worry about making good contact.

 

It sounds like your kid is lunging, so it sounds like footwork. Draw a line in chalk like the batters box. Put his toes on it, and tell him to step and swing. His back foot should stay planted. If his front foot goes over the line he's doing it wrong. Do it again. Show him where his front foot should land, and the line from the tip of his back toes, through his front toes should form a line that if extended aims right at the pitching rubber.

 

It's all about instilling confidence in your son and guiding his ability to hit the ball. Hope my advice helps a little.

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