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I don’t buy this Raisel non-save situation BS


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It’s pretty standard to use your closer at home in the 9th in a tie game. Otherwise you’re just eliminating your best reliever for the rest of the game. 

Except he's been incredible his entire career in save situations.  Don't underestimate the mental aspect of the game.

The Ohtani version of getting hit with a water bottle.  

Iglesias should be fine.  He's got multiple pitches and good stuff.  Every team sees some struggles out of relievers at times, it happens.

That said though, if for some reason he does start declining, it's another great example of why teams really should avoid signing closers to long-term deals.  Relievers, by nature, are really volatile, and it's rare to find someone who can be dominant over the course of a 4+ year deal.

Even if Iglesias steps up and is lights out the rest of the way, I'd rank our offseason re-signing priorities as:  1.  Bundy.   2.  Jose Iglesias.  3.  Raisel Iglesias (a distant third, with the first two being fairly significant priorities).

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I maintain your best pitcher should be on the mound whenever you need him. If the Angels are ahead by 1 or 2 runs and the other team has the bases loaded in the the 7th, I want the best reliever in the pen on the mound. Get through that inning without giving up any runs and worry about the 9th when it comes.

"Closers" absolutely have the mentality that they come into the game when their team is winning by 3 runs or less and they are there to get the last 3 outs. They aren't as focused when the game is tied.

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6 hours ago, Warfarin said:

Iglesias should be fine.  He's got multiple pitches and good stuff.  Every team sees some struggles out of relievers at times, it happens.

That said though, if for some reason he does start declining, it's another great example of why teams really should avoid signing closers to long-term deals.  Relievers, by nature, are really volatile, and it's rare to find someone who can be dominant over the course of a 4+ year deal.

Even if Iglesias steps up and is lights out the rest of the way, I'd rank our offseason re-signing priorities as:  1.  Bundy.   2.  Jose Iglesias.  3.  Raisel Iglesias (a distant third, with the first two being fairly significant priorities).

This is why draft pitching and more pitching to always have that depth in the minors.

It’s easier to find position player depth from other teams, plus they don’t nearly as much break down as pitchers do.

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8 hours ago, beatlesrule said:

I maintain your best pitcher should be on the mound whenever you need him. If the Angels are ahead by 1 or 2 runs and the other team has the bases loaded in the the 7th, I want the best reliever in the pen on the mound. Get through that inning without giving up any runs and worry about the 9th when it comes.

"Closers" absolutely have the mentality that they come into the game when their team is winning by 3 runs or less and they are there to get the last 3 outs. They aren't as focused when the game is tied.

I many long discussions with Huston Street about this. 
 

The problem with that is it’s not a computer game where you just push a button and the reliever you want comes in. They have a lot of prep they need to do to get ready, beyond simply warming up. If your closer basically has to be gassed up to go from the 7th inning on he’s going to burn out quickly. 
 

Let’s say you’re up by 2 and the No 8 hitter leads off the 7th with a single. You’re basically one baserunner away from the game being “on the line,” so do you start warming your closer up now? And what if the next three guys make outs. So he sits down and then has to warm up again in the 8th if someone gets on? How many times do you think you’d go through that in a season?

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3 minutes ago, Jeff Fletcher said:

I many long discussions with Huston Street about this. 
 

The problem with that is it’s not a computer game where you just push a button and the reliever you want comes in. They have a lot of prep they need to do to get ready, beyond simply warming up. If your closer basically has to be gassed up to go from the 7th inning on he’s going to burn out quickly. 
 

Let’s say you’re up by 2 and the No 8 hitter leads off the 7th with a single. You’re basically one baserunner away from the game being “on the line,” so do you start warming your closer up now? And what if the next three guys make outs. So he sits down and then has to warm up again in the 8th if someone gets on? How many times do you think you’d go through that in a season?

Other than warming up their arms, what “prep” do they need to do?  Listen to AC/DC Thunderstruck like 3 times? 

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4 minutes ago, Jeff Fletcher said:

I many long discussions with Huston Street about this. 
 

The problem with that is it’s not a computer game where you just push a button and the reliever you want comes in. They have a lot of prep they need to do to get ready, beyond simply warming up. If your closer basically has to be gassed up to go from the 7th inning on he’s going to burn out quickly. 
 

Let’s say you’re up by 2 and the No 8 hitter leads off the 7th with a single. You’re basically one baserunner away from the game being “on the line,” so do you start warming your closer up now? And what if the next three guys make outs. So he sits down and then has to warm up again in the 8th if someone gets on? How many times do you think you’d go through that in a season?

Perhaps I wasn't clear. If the best pitcher in the bullpen is your closer, he comes in with the bases loaded in the 7th and the next inning, you can have a different RP pitch. My point is you might not even have a lead for the closer to protect in the 9th if the other team scores a bunch of runs in that bases loaded 7th. I want the best RP to pitch in a situation like that. As for your other concerns, he just doesn't pitch I guess. Maybe have 2 "closer" type pitchers in your bullpen? I just want my best pitcher pitching when the team needs it. That's not always the 9th inning.

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3 minutes ago, cals said:

Other than warming up their arms, what “prep” do they need to do?  Listen to AC/DC Thunderstruck like 3 times? 

I think some of them have a routine with stretching, massages, eating, etc.

But I think even if you ignore all that, the warming up part is problematic 

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1 minute ago, beatlesrule said:

Perhaps I wasn't clear. If the best pitcher in the bullpen is your closer, he comes in with the bases loaded in the 7th and the next inning, you can have a different RP pitch. My point is you might not even have a lead for the closer to protect in the 9th if the other team scores a bunch of runs in that bases loaded 7th. I want the best RP to pitch in a situation like that. As for your other concerns, he just doesn't pitch I guess. Maybe have 2 "closer" type pitchers in your bullpen? I just want my best pitcher pitching when the team needs it. That's not always the 9th inning.

Obviously if you have 2 or 3 “best” relievers then it’s not a problem. 
 

But if you keeping warming one guy up over and over it’s gonna cause problems. Maybe he won’t be as effective when you do need him because he’s been getting hot for 45 minutes. Maybe he can’t pitch two days in a row now. 

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I’ll add the other thing Street said is you can absolutely use your closer that way in September or October because he’s emptying the tank. You just can’t do it all year. 
 

You can argue the point but I’m gonna say he probably knows more about it than you or I do. 

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9 hours ago, beatlesrule said:

I maintain your best pitcher should be on the mound whenever you need him. If the Angels are ahead by 1 or 2 runs and the other team has the bases loaded in the the 7th, I want the best reliever in the pen on the mound. Get through that inning without giving up any runs and worry about the 9th when it comes.

"Closers" absolutely have the mentality that they come into the game when their team is winning by 3 runs or less and they are there to get the last 3 outs. They aren't as focused when the game is tied.

This is nonsense. 

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5 minutes ago, Jeff Fletcher said:

I think some of them have a routine with stretching, massages, eating, etc.

But I think even if you ignore all that, the warming up part is problematic 

 

1 minute ago, Jeff Fletcher said:

I’ll add the other thing Street said is you can absolutely use your closer that way in September or October because he’s emptying the tank. You just can’t do it all year. 
 

You can argue the point but I’m gonna say he probably knows more about it than you or I do. 

This makes sense if we’re discussing later season fatigue and issues regarding consistency related to it but not if the issue is blowing saves the first week of the season because it’s not a “save” situation unless they aren’t totally “gearing up” for the non save situations.  Which seems problematic and unprofessional.

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