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Pick The Worst FA Available You'd Want The Angels To Sign


totdprods

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For many Angel fans, Cahill, Bour, Harvey, and Lucroy represent an underwhelming (at best) offseason haul. With two months of offseason to go, the Angels still have opportunity to sign more players who at first blush, are quite a let down. Players who are coming off seasons so miserable, or players who are as ancient as Pujols himself, that lead many fans to wonder what bounceback Eppler could possibly see.

Sometimes these gambles pay off.
Last March, Atlanta signed 34-year old Anibal Sanchez, coming off three seasons and 88 games of of 5.67 ball for the Tigers, for $1 million dollars. 
25 games of 2.83 ERA later, Sanchez signed a multi-year deal with Washington.

Who would your choice be? 
Bonus points for making the best argument for the worst possible player - just because Mike Moustakas has a bad OBP doesn't make him a bad player, so try and find someone more challenging.
I'd love to see someone make a case for Chris Tillman - 7.84 ERA in '17, 10.46 ERA in '18, and a 7.32 ERA in ten AAA starts as well.

I'll offer up a hitter and a pitcher. 

Neil Walker (.219/.309/.354/.664, 79 OPS+, -0.1 WAR in 113 games)
Entering his age 33 season in 2019, the switch-hitting walker started 10+ games at RF, 1B, 3B, and 2B last year, and a few innings in left, and while he wasn't great defensively, he wasn't a total embarrassment, and with Fletcher serving as a strong defensive option, Walker could be the more offense-oriented option. Additionally, some vet savvy may have helped him manage a .785 OPS with RISP and .930 OPS in high-leverage situations. There are some worrying indicators - his K% jumped up 4%, more than the MLB average, and his swinging strike % jumped up 2% as well, but his BB% remains a healthy bit above league average, and his 2018 BAbip of .257 was a career low - it's been around .300 for his career. He's reportedly been on the Angels radar in the past.

So why bother? Even in his abysmal '18, he still posted an OBP .90 points higher than his BA, and has been an on-base machine for nearly a decade prior -  never lower than .328, including a .362 mark in 2017. While the power drop-off is concerning, a return to a .250/.340/.400/.740 mark wouldn't be out of the question, and the OBP could serve nicely hitting ahead of Trout.

Phil Hughes (6.34 ERA, , 1.65 WHIP, 6.59 FIP, 65 ERA+ in 23 games, 32.2 IP)
Plucked by the Yankees from Foothills HS, Hughes couldn't stick with neither Minnesota or San Diego last season. A flyball pitcher who has never posted big strikeout rates, at first glance he seems to be the opposite of an Eppler acquisition. Then again, so was Lucroy. One thing did stand out for Hughes in 2018 - a big uptick in strikeouts, pitching mostly in relief. Small sample size warning in effect, Hughes struck out 24 in 20 relief innings with the Pads, and a swinging strike percentage (8.3%) he hadn't managed since '14. Hughes also upped his sinker use dramatically to 13.5%, well above his career 4% usage, and saw his sinker velocity return to a level unmmatched since 2014 (91mph). Like recent signee Matt Harvey, Hughes has been battling thoracic outlet syndrome issues.

Likely costing no more than a ST invite, Hughes could serve in similar utility to Bud Norris - a starter who could give the Angels depth in the bullpen as a multi-inning reliever, maybe finding himself suited for a late-innings role or remaining rotation depth.
 

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1 minute ago, stevestevens said:

You are a more dedicated fan than me.  No way I could write multiple paragraphs on how two guys who suck would fit into the Angels 2019 season.  

This was intended to be a little tongue-in-cheek. We put so much focus on the players who are obviously good, even on the lesser tiers, but Eppler obviously looks at everyone. I also think Plus it'll give @Lou some great bump material. 

Last year, I had talked up signing LoMo, Walker, and Cahill, all were 'panned' as bad ideas. 
Walker wound up...okay. Awful, but arguably even or better than Marte/Valbuena, LoMo similarly, and Cahill, well, here we are.

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I don't think I'd like a big money deal for Kimbrel or Britton. I don't think closers in general are a good investment, especially one that wants $80M.

I also don't think I'd like another infield guy who can't play the OF. The only spot I think available on this roster right now is a Platoon RF/4th OF spot, which if filled by a Carlos Gonzalez or Nick Markakis might make some sense, but another infielder like DJ LeMahieu, doesn't seem to make sense. Lowrie you could put at 1st/3rd or in the OF.

I'd be okay signing most free agents left except they would also need to make a trade to clear up some of the existing money.

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I am not sure I am committed enough to do this either.  But I guess I would go with Pomeranz because everyone on here I resepect seems to like the guy as a bounce back candidate.  Another guy I would like to take a flyer on would be Greg Holland.  On the offensive side of things I’d almost stay in house and assume Kole is that guy.  I know it isn’t an acquisition but he has as much chance of bouncing back as anyone out there.  How many other guys are out there where you could honestly expect a 2 WAR improvement from one year to the next?  I could see Kole being a 2.5 WAR player next year.  

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2 minutes ago, Hubs said:

I don't think I'd like a big money deal for Kimbrel or Britton. I don't think closers in general are a good investment, especially one that wants $80M.

I also don't think I'd like another infield guy who can't play the OF. The only spot I think available on this roster right now is a Platoon RF/4th OF spot, which if filled by a Carlos Gonzalez or Nick Markakis might make some sense, but another infielder like DJ LeMahieu, doesn't seem to make sense. Lowrie you could put at 1st/3rd or in the OF.

I'd be okay signing most free agents left except they would also need to make a trade to clear up some of the existing money.

I don't think I'd qualify any of those guys as bad remaining free agents.

I'm talking the AJ Ellis, Brad Miller, Yangervis Solarte, Carlos Gonzalez, Josh Tomlin types. Who is the 'worst' FA available left you think could rebound and help the Angels?

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4 hours ago, Pujols4MVP said:

Yep. Santana on a 1 year deal with incentives.

I could just as easily see him signing with the A's, as soon as he puts on that magical A's cap he'll suddenly go 15-6 with 2.93 ERA.

Well, Ervin's Magic has been previously the even #'ed season. He lost last season. So, I am calling a 14-4 3.68 season coming.

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6 hours ago, totdprods said:

For many Angel fans, Cahill, Bour, Harvey, and Lucroy represent an underwhelming (at best) offseason haul. With two months of offseason to go, the Angels still have opportunity to sign more players who at first blush, are quite a let down. Players who are coming off seasons so miserable, or players who are as ancient as Pujols himself, that lead many fans to wonder what bounceback Eppler could possibly see.

Sometimes these gambles pay off.
Last March, Atlanta signed 34-year old Anibal Sanchez, coming off three seasons and 88 games of of 5.67 ball for the Tigers, for $1 million dollars. 
25 games of 2.83 ERA later, Sanchez signed a multi-year deal with Washington.

Who would your choice be? 
Bonus points for making the best argument for the worst possible player - just because Mike Moustakas has a bad OBP doesn't make him a bad player, so try and find someone more challenging.
I'd love to see someone make a case for Chris Tillman - 7.84 ERA in '17, 10.46 ERA in '18, and a 7.32 ERA in ten AAA starts as well.

I'll offer up a hitter and a pitcher. 

Neil Walker (.219/.309/.354/.664, 79 OPS+, -0.1 WAR in 113 games)
Entering his age 33 season in 2019, the switch-hitting walker started 10+ games at RF, 1B, 3B, and 2B last year, and a few innings in left, and while he wasn't great defensively, he wasn't a total embarrassment, and with Fletcher serving as a strong defensive option, Walker could be the more offense-oriented option. Additionally, some vet savvy may have helped him manage a .785 OPS with RISP and .930 OPS in high-leverage situations. There are some worrying indicators - his K% jumped up 4%, more than the MLB average, and his swinging strike % jumped up 2% as well, but his BB% remains a healthy bit above league average, and his 2018 BAbip of .257 was a career low - it's been around .300 for his career. He's reportedly been on the Angels radar in the past.

So why bother? Even in his abysmal '18, he still posted an OBP .90 points higher than his BA, and has been an on-base machine for nearly a decade prior -  never lower than .328, including a .362 mark in 2017. While the power drop-off is concerning, a return to a .250/.340/.400/.740 mark wouldn't be out of the question, and the OBP could serve nicely hitting ahead of Trout.

Phil Hughes (6.34 ERA, , 1.65 WHIP, 6.59 FIP, 65 ERA+ in 23 games, 32.2 IP)
Plucked by the Yankees from Foothills HS, Hughes couldn't stick with neither Minnesota or San Diego last season. A flyball pitcher who has never posted big strikeout rates, at first glance he seems to be the opposite of an Eppler acquisition. Then again, so was Lucroy. One thing did stand out for Hughes in 2018 - a big uptick in strikeouts, pitching mostly in relief. Small sample size warning in effect, Hughes struck out 24 in 20 relief innings with the Pads, and a swinging strike percentage (8.3%) he hadn't managed since '14. Hughes also upped his sinker use dramatically to 13.5%, well above his career 4% usage, and saw his sinker velocity return to a level unmmatched since 2014 (91mph). Like recent signee Matt Harvey, Hughes has been battling thoracic outlet syndrome issues.

Likely costing no more than a ST invite, Hughes could serve in similar utility to Bud Norris - a starter who could give the Angels depth in the bullpen as a multi-inning reliever, maybe finding himself suited for a late-innings role or remaining rotation depth.
 

Good Call, regarding Hughes! I forgot he was still playing~

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