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Baseball Photo Trivia

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A more challenging extra-credit question:

 

What pitcher got the save for the Cardinals?

 

HINT: He's a Hall of Famer, top five all-time in wins, and earlier in his career won at least 30 games three years in a row. He was also 39 years old in 1926.

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That's a no brainer (for me anyway), Grover Cleveland Alexander. 

 

I forgot that Frisch managed the Cardinals to the 1934 WS title, but left his mark as a player for the NY Giants, although being traded to the Cardinals the year after in 1927.

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Alexander was hung over after a night of hard drinking. He had gone nine innings the day before and won, but was called into the game in the 6th inning with the bases loaded, two outs, and the Cardinals clinging to a 3-2 lead. He struck out Tony Lazzeri one pitch after Lazzeri's bid for a grand slam went a couple feet foul.

 

1926pic1.jpg

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No one, saves were not an official stat in 1926.

 

A more challenging extra-credit question:

 

What pitcher got the save for the Cardinals?

 

HINT: He's a Hall of Famer, top five all-time in wins, and earlier in his career won at least 30 games three years in a row. He was also 39 years old in 1926.

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Revisionist history. The save was never recognized as a stat until 1969. So Grover Cleveland was never awarded a save for the game, he was just credited with it 40+ years later, it was never a part of the official scoring for the 1929 World Series.  

 

A pitcher before 1969 was either awarded the win or loss regardless if you were a starter or reliever. Makes more sense than the participation award we now call the save which is based on how many runs the lead is and how many hitters reach base.

 

He's given credit for one in all the record books, so that's official enough for me.

 

32 career regular-season saves, 1 World Series save.

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Shortstop Tony Kubek got hit in the throat by a bad bounce on a GB.

...and it left the door open for a 5-run Pirate rally that put them ahead 9-7. The Yankees scored two in the top of the 9th and the rest is history. Kubek had to go to the hospital and was in pretty bad shape, actually. His larynx was smashed up pretty well.

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Speaking of Yogi Berra:

 

Moments after Game 7 of the 1956 World Series ended, Jackie Robinson's last appearance as a player, he sought out Yogi in the triumphant Yankee clubhouse to congratulate him. (Yogi hit two home runs in Game 7).

Only a year earlier, Yogi ventured into a delirious Dodgers clubhouse after Brooklyn finally beat the Yankees for its first and only world championship. Amid the wild celebration, Yogi ventured over to his longtime rival and said, smiling, "What's new, Jack?"

 

531872_484341941632596_424224034_n.jpg

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Yogi-Berra-Museum-Learning-Center/134224396644354

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On today's date 74 years ago (June 12th, 1939) the first induction ceremony at the new Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY took place.

 

How many of these major league greats can you name in this historic photo taken that day?

 

Name the man and his position in the photo.

 

I'll start with the obvious one: Babe Ruth, bottom row, 2nd from left. I'll call him Player #2 for the sake of this question.

 

So bottom row persons are numbered 1,2,3,4 from left to right. 

Top row are numbered 5,6,7,8,9,10 from left to right.

 

 

HOF_Weekend_1939_group_4468.89__NBL_1_t6

 

 

Some hints:

 

Person #1 (front row on the left) was a second baseman.

#2 is Babe Ruth, of course.

#3 was born in Massachusetts to Irish immigrants.

#4 was a pitcher.

 

#5 (Top row beginning at left) was mostly a shortstop.

#6 was a pitcher who played for 20 seasons.

#7 holds one career batting record and four career fielding records.

#8 A position player, he was in his prime in the first decade of the 20th century.

#9 held a record that was broken by Ichiro Suzuki.

#10 (top row, on the far right) pitched for 21 seasons, all with the same team.

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