Jump to content
  • Welcome to AngelsWin.com

    AngelsWin.com - THE Internet Home for Angels fans! Unraveling Angels Baseball ... One Thread at a Time.

    Register today to join the most interactive online Angels community on the net!

    Once you're a member you'll see less advertisements. Become a Premium member and you won't see any ads! 

     

U.S. government hacked; feds think China is the culprit


Recommended Posts

 This comes at a perfect time when people have been crying out for more online privacy.   Even though they aren't sure,  China's name gets plastered all over the media.  I think the govt. will do whatever it takes to keep or tigten up it's surveillance on Americans.  We'll see where it goes i guess.

Edited by acro2008
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let's see, after they accused NK of hacking Sony, they imposed sanctions on them, even though many international cyber experts, including some in this very country, said all evidence pointed to an 'inside' job.  Now they accuse China of a major hack on 4 million federal employees even though this information wouldn't benefit China in any way, shape, or form.  I guess we'll know more if we impose sanctions on China, or try to push for more control/regulation of the internet.  If I'm right, it'll one or the other, if not both.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with your conspiracy theory is that if the government really did believe China did the hacking then sanctions would be inevitable. If China did the hacking then sanctions don't prove some ulterior motive of our government. It would be an appropriate and measured response.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hacking files used to be James Bond with a microfilm camera taking pictures of pages out of a file cabinet. Now some geek behind a home built computer can download millions of files without worrying about a minimum wage security guard wondering why the light is on in the secret documents room.

 

We should  back to paper.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with your conspiracy theory is that if the government really did believe China did the hacking then sanctions would be inevitable. If China did the hacking then sanctions don't prove some ulterior motive of our government. It would be an appropriate and measured response.

Of course sanctions would be inevitable.  That's the point of the hack.  I thought people would get I was impying a false flag here.

 

Anyway, now we may know the reason for a possible false flag against China.

 

"Until China curtails their hacking operations, the IMF shouldn’t designate the [renminbi] as a reserve currency. We need to punish China’s bad behaviour, not reward it.”

 

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6fecb9d8-0ebc-11e5-848e-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3cbAx1Byw

 

 

 

Edit: I'm only posting the full article because it doesn't require a subscription if you click on a direct link in a Google search.  For whatever reason, the above link is not working right.  The article is free to read if googled, so I figure no harm no foul in cut & pasting.

 

 

 

 

The International Monetary Fund should hold off including China’s currency in a policy basket in retaliation for hacking attacks on the US, two senators have demanded.

In a letter on Tuesday to Christine Lagarde, the IMF’s managing director, Charles Schumer and Lindsey Graham said an attack on the records of 4m US government employees that had been blamed on China deserved to be punished.

“This recent cyber attack is one of China’s most brazen yet,” Mr Schumer said. “It is long past time for the international community to rally together and make crystal clear to the Chinese government that if they want to be treated as a leading nation on the global stage, then they need to start acting like it.

“Until China curtails their hacking operations, the IMF shouldn’t designate the [renminbi] as a reserve currency. We need to punish China’s bad behaviour, not reward it.”

The IMF is due to decide this year whether to include China’s currency in the basket used to determine its own quasi-currency, Special Drawing Rights.

Beijing has been pushing for the renminbi to be included as part of long-term efforts to spread its use and have the renminbi challenge the dollar as a global reserve currency.

The IMF’s board is set to meet next month to review the technical case for including the currency, and again this year to make a formal decision on inclusion.

Last month, in a move that many observers interpreted as a sign of the IMF’s desire to accommodate China’s wishes, the fund went against the US and declared for the first time in almost two decades that it believed the renminbi was “no longer undervalued”.

The US Treasury continues to insist that the renminbi is significantly undervalued and that Chinese exporters have a big competitive advantage as a result.

Tuesday’s letter highlights the volatile politics in Washington with regards to China’s currency.

Until China curtails their hacking operations, the IMF shouldn’t designate the [renminbi] as a reserve currency. We need to punish China’s bad behaviour, not reward it

Mr Schumer has been one of the leading advocates of tougher provisions that would allow the US to use punitive duties and other trade sanctions to retaliate against countries found guilty of manipulating their currencies.

But the move to link currency politics and the IMF’s deliberations with recent cyber attacks marks a fresh approach for congressional critics of China.

In their letter the senators cited a recent hacking attack as an example of “China’s rapacious actions that are aimed at disrupting the global economy and undermining the stability of international market participants”.

The two senators said they believed that the renminbi remained significantly undervalued and that China’s economic reforms and efforts to liberalise currency and capital flows had yet to go far enough for it to be eligible to be included in the IMF basket.

“The IMF has a responsibility to only assign currencies to its SDR basket if the currency is deemed to be ‘freely usable’ in international markets,” the senators wrote. “This requires that the currency is convertible, and it is clear that the [renminbi] is not.”

Edited by HaloFan85
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You may also ask why would the US care about the renminbi or yuan as a world reserve currency.

 

This might help you realize why the US is calling for the IMF to punish China in this way.

 

The headline pretty much says it all.

 

"The PetroYuan is born: Gazprom now settling all crude sales to China in Renminbi"

 

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-06-09/petroyuan-born-gazprom-now-settling-all-crude-sales-china-renminbi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You act as if the U.S. is the only amoral country around. 

 

I'm not going to ascribe any goodness or innocence to countries with the history of Russia or China.

I don't think he's trying to do that. I think he's just pointing out that the U.S. Is more than happy to paint Russia and China in a bad light in order to preserve the petrodollar. After all, without that we lose the ability to try and print our way to prosperity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course sanctions would be inevitable.  That's the point of the hack.  I thought people would get I was impying a false flag here.

 

Anyway, now we may know the reason for a possible false flag against China.

 

"Until China curtails their hacking operations, the IMF shouldn’t designate the [renminbi] as a reserve currency. We need to punish China’s bad behaviour, not reward it.”

 

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6fecb9d8-0ebc-11e5-848e-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3cbAx1Byw

 

Edit: I'm only posting the full article because it doesn't require a subscription if you click on a direct link in a Google search.  For whatever reason, the above link is not working right.  The article is free to read if googled, so I figure no harm no foul in cut & pasting.

 

In a letter on Tuesday to Christine Lagarde, the IMF’s managing director, Charles Schumer and Lindsey Graham said an attack on the records of 4m US government employees that had been blamed on China deserved to be punished.

 

 

you mean this guy?

 

006402_17.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course sanctions would be inevitable. That's the point of the hack. I thought people would get I was impying a false flag here.

The point was that you implied we'd somehow be able to make some determination as to the culprit of the hacks if America announced sanctions against China. But sanctions would happen whether China or the US was guilty of the hacking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think he's trying to do that. I think he's just pointing out that the U.S. Is more than happy to paint Russia and China in a bad light in order to preserve the petrodollar. After all, without that we lose the ability to try and print our way to prosperity.

 

and Russia and China would be quite happy to dump issues on the U.S. to damage them.

 

Is it not entirely possible that China did do the hacking?  They are not benevolent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You act as if the U.S. is the only amoral country around. 

 

I'm not going to ascribe any goodness or innocence to countries with the history of Russia or China.

And you act as if the US deserves no scrutiny, even though we (Obama) has proclaimed the US to be the sole exceptional and indispensable nation in the world, not to mention we take it upon ourselves to act as moral authority of the world even though we show blatant disregard for international laws and basic human rights.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And you act as if the US deserves no scrutiny, even though we (Obama) has proclaimed the US to be the sole exceptional and indispensable nation in the world, not to mention we take it upon ourselves to act as moral authority of the world even though we show blatant disregard for international laws and basic human rights.[/

Lol, you have not read many of my posts. I don't believe any of the big nations are benevolent

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm an officer in the Army Reserve and they tell us that Chinese love to hack into our systems. I'm not a computer expert, but I don't think we can have a closed system unless we just have wired connections with no internet or distance capability. We have a system where people use CAC cards and other ID to log in to access information remotely. 

 

I'm sure if it were as simple as just fixing it, somebody would have figured it out. 

 

This is what we use in the military: 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIPRNet

 

 

The Chinese hacked in and we don't think a strong response is worth the economic or military pain in the ass it would be. 

Edited by Juan Savage
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...