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Your favorite Angels batting order ever


Lou E Ville

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In 1982 we had

 

1. Brian Downing (lots of home runs and good OBP, but not a lot of speed)

2. Rod Carew (best bat control ever?)

3. Reggie Jackson (led league in taters that year)

4. Don Baylor (solid year)

5. Doug DeCinces (our best offensive player that year)

6. Fred Lynn (solid)

7. Bobby Grich (solid)

8. Tim Foli (great sacrifice guy under Mauch)

9. Bob Boone (great sacrifce guy under Mauch)

 

I think that team had six guys with 20 home runs. Only problem was they were all veterans and there wasn't any speed, so Mauch bunted every chance he could.

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2000 had 

 

1. Darin Erstad

2. Adam Kennedy

3. Mo Vaughn

4. Tim Salmon

5. Garret Anderson

6. Troy Glaus

7. Scott Spiezio

8. Bengie Molina

9. Benji Gil

 

That's the year Erstad hit .355, Kennedy drove in over 70 runs, and... oh yeah, Vaughn, Salmon, Anderson, and Glaus were the first time any team had 4 players hit 30+ homers (Glaus led the league with 47). 

 

If that team had ANY pitching at all (and-- spoiler alert-- it didn't), they could have won the West and been a serious WS contender. Unfortunately, while that team scored a whopping 864 runs, they gave up 869. So that awesome lineup managed 82 wins.

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2000 had 

 

1. Darin Erstad

2. Adam Kennedy

3. Mo Vaughn

4. Tim Salmon

5. Garret Anderson

6. Troy Glaus

7. Scott Spiezio

8. Bengie Molina

9. Benji Gil

 

That's the year Erstad hit .355, Kennedy drove in over 70 runs, and... oh yeah, Vaughn, Salmon, Anderson, and Glaus were the first time any team had 4 players hit 30+ homers (Glaus led the league with 47). 

 

If that team had ANY pitching at all (and-- spoiler alert-- it didn't), they could have won the West and been a serious WS contender. Unfortunately, while that team scored a whopping 864 runs, they gave up 869. So that awesome lineup managed 82 wins.

 

I don't know, but I think I might like the current one.  At least the line-up.  Last year was pretty special, at least the top of the order.

 

 

My view on this is that it's a tossup between the anticipated 2013 team (with a better "big three" but not as deep), and the old 2000 team. Unfortunately I suspect the 2013 team will pitch about as well as the 2000 team...

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It's hard to top the .300 lineup.

 

http://angelswin.com/greatest_moments.aspx

#49 - Aug. 18, 2009: Nine Times .300

Angels3003.jpg

 

By Geoff Bilau - AngelsWin.com Senior Editor

In the top of the fifth inning of their Aug. 18 game at Jacobs Field in Cleveland, Angels catcher Mike Napoli smashed a line drive single into center field off Indians starter Fausto Carmona. It was Napoli's second hit of the game, lifting his batting average to .302.

And though Napoli popped up and struck out in his final two at-bats of the Angels 5-4 victory, his average at the game's conclusion was .300. While it's always noteworthy when a batter (especially a career .256 hitter) eclipses the magical .300 mark, this particular moment was altogether monumental. Napoli was just one of nine Angels hitters who finished that game with a batting average of .300 or better.

300_lineup.jpg

It would last only those final four innings and the time leading up to the next day's game — Angels manager Mike Scioscia inserted .275 hitting Howie Kendrick for .300 hitting Izturis and Napoli flew out to left field after walking twice, dropping his average back to .299 — but it was historic, however fleeting as it may have been.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, it marked the first time since 1934 that any Major League team at least 100 games into its season finished a game with every player in its starting lineup hitting .300 or better. Mickey Cochrane's Tigers accomplished the feat Sept. 9, 1934, against Boston — which was all the more impressive considering pitcher Lynwood "Schoolboy" Rowe and his .301 average was batting ninth. The Tigers lineup that day included four Hall of Famers (Cochrane, Hank Greenberg, Charlie Gehringer, Goose Goslin) and two All-Stars (Rowe, Gee Walker).

The Angels hitting heroics helped rookie starter Trevor Bell win his first Major League game — one that he and Angels fans won't soon forge

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  • 3 years later...
On 2/24/2013 at 0:00 PM, VanderTweets said:

2000 had 

 

1. Darin Erstad

2. Adam Kennedy

3. Mo Vaughn

4. Tim Salmon

5. Garret Anderson

6. Troy Glaus

7. Scott Spiezio

8. Bengie Molina

9. Benji Gil

 

That's the year Erstad hit .355, Kennedy drove in over 70 runs, and... oh yeah, Vaughn, Salmon, Anderson, and Glaus were the first time any team had 4 players hit 30+ homers (Glaus led the league with 47). 

 

If that team had ANY pitching at all (and-- spoiler alert-- it didn't), they could have won the West and been a serious WS contender. Unfortunately, while that team scored a whopping 864 runs, they gave up 869. So that awesome lineup managed 82 wins.

Man what I wouldn't give to get this kind of production from today's lineup!

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On paper the 2004 lineup had maybe the most talent, along with some of my favorite players. Though GA, Glaus and Salmon were injured much of the season, I would still have to say that this lineup was my favorite mix of players of all time.

2004 Opening day lineup

Eckstein - SS

Erstad - 1B

Guererro - RF

Anderson - CF

Glaus - 3B

Guillen - LF

Salmon - DH

Molina - C

Kennedy - 2B

 

And not to mention Figgins on the bench. In hindsight I wish Stoneman would've kept this lineup together for a couple of years. I think we just ran into a buzz saw in the Sux. 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, gurn67 said:

1982 lineup was my favorite. Unfortunately, they gave up the wrong bat to get the wrong closer.

Yep, Brunansky for Corbett and Wilfong was not good ultimately.   At least Wilfong and Corbett contributed in 1986, although Wilfong's failure to take 2B on the throw home to try to get Jones in the 9th inning was costly, as Schofield's single to RF might have won the ALCS then.

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