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De La Rosa and Shoemaker sent down


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Scoured the internet and forums on Yoslan Herrera. During his last stint in the majors (2008) he was a starter who only topped out at the mid-high 80s with a good breaking ball.

 

http://www.altoonamirror.com/page/blogs.detail/display/5994/Remember-Yoslan-Herrera--Believe-it-or-not--he-s-back-in-the-majors.html

 

"Herrera always had a sharp curveball during his Curve days, but with a fastball only in the mid- to upper-80s, the right-hander couldn't get by much on that and had to rely heavily on his offspeed stuff. That's almost always a bad sign for a minor league pitcher, and it was especially bad for the Pirates, who had given him a three-year contract worth $1.9 million but never got much in return."

 

 

As the article stated, Herrera couldn't get it done by just throwing the breaking ball to cover up his lack of velocity. Well in his debut with the Angels he topped out at 97 miles per hour and continued to show a sharp breaking ball. Maybe the increased velocity can be the ingredient that gets his career on track. Just trying to be an optimist. 

Edited by rafibomb
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Reference ddlr, any word on if hes hurt or anything? Or is the word just a bad outing / called back too soon?

 

He probably needs to work on his arm strength.    

 

I hate to be a prick but I don't really get the fascination with DDLR, yes his stats looked good, he also allowed 18 of the 41 inherited runners to score last year -- in what world is that a good number?  Nearly 44%.  I understand the numbers are somewhat vague as it doesn't differentiate between high leverage situations or close games etc etc -- but he seems overrated in some ways.  Based purely on those numbers he's hardly been a shut down reliever.  Kohn get's reviled quite a bit here but he only allowed 11 of the 44 runners he inherited to score.  Kevin Jepsen is considered a gas can and yet his career IR/IS ratio is 117/32.    Yep, DDLR in his one year has allowed more than half as many IR to score as Jepsen has in his entire career.  

 

I hope the guy gets his velocity back and is able to help the Angels but, I don't see him as the savior some people seem to make him out to be.

Edited by Inside Pitch
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Scoured the internet and forums on Yoslan Herrera. During his last stint in the majors (2008) he was a starter who only topped out at the mid-high 80s with a good breaking ball.

 

http://www.altoonamirror.com/page/blogs.detail/display/5994/Remember-Yoslan-Herrera--Believe-it-or-not--he-s-back-in-the-majors.html

 

"Herrera always had a sharp curveball during his Curve days, but with a fastball only in the mid- to upper-80s, the right-hander couldn't get by much on that and had to rely heavily on his offspeed stuff. That's almost always a bad sign for a minor league pitcher, and it was especially bad for the Pirates, who had given him a three-year contract worth $1.9 million but never got much in return."

 

 

As the article stated, Herrera couldn't get it done by just throwing the breaking ball to cover up his lack of velocity. Well in his debut with the Angels he topped out at 97 miles per hour and continued to show a sharp breaking ball. Maybe the increased velocity can be the ingredient that gets his career on track. Just trying to be an optimist. 

 

Nice find -- failed SPs are the greatest source of RPs.....  

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The DDLR inherited runners scoring stat is a concern, although he seemed to do solidly when beginning an inning. 

That is why his best spot in the pen is probably as the 4th option, once he gets his velocity back to normal.

 

Can Kohn assume the 7th inning role eventually in his 2nd season post-TJ surgery?   He has the stuff.

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Scoured the internet and forums on Yoslan Herrera. During his last stint in the majors (2008) he was a starter who only topped out at the mid-high 80s with a good breaking ball.

 

http://www.altoonamirror.com/page/blogs.detail/display/5994/Remember-Yoslan-Herrera--Believe-it-or-not--he-s-back-in-the-majors.html

 

"Herrera always had a sharp curveball during his Curve days, but with a fastball only in the mid- to upper-80s, the right-hander couldn't get by much on that and had to rely heavily on his offspeed stuff. That's almost always a bad sign for a minor league pitcher, and it was especially bad for the Pirates, who had given him a three-year contract worth $1.9 million but never got much in return."

 

 

As the article stated, Herrera couldn't get it done by just throwing the breaking ball to cover up his lack of velocity. Well in his debut with the Angels he topped out at 97 miles per hour and continued to show a sharp breaking ball. Maybe the increased velocity can be the ingredient that gets his career on track. Just trying to be an optimist. 

Did he go see Colon's nutritionist?

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He probably needs to work on his arm strength.

I hate to be a prick but I don't really get the fascination with DDLR, yes his stats looked good, he also allowed 18 of the 41 inherited runners to score last year -- in what world is that a good number? Nearly 44%. I understand the numbers are somewhat vague as it doesn't differentiate between high leverage situations or close games etc etc -- but he seems overrated in some ways. Based purely on those numbers he's hardly been a shut down reliever. Kohn get's reviled quite a bit here but he only allowed 11 of the 44 runners he inherited to score. Kevin Jepsen is considered a gas can and yet his career IR/IS ratio is 117/32. Yep, DDLR in his one year has allowed more than half as many IR to score as Jepsen has in his entire career.

I hope the guy gets his velocity back and is able to help the Angels but, I don't see him as the savior some people seem to make him out to be.

He was one of the few bright spots in a horrible pen last year. He is by no means spectacular but he is solid and the Angels need all the solid relievers they can get.

As for the inherited runners thing, that's certainly cause for concern but it's a pretty big sample size issue. How many of those inherited runners were on 3rd with less than 2 outs?

I would still take him any day over Jepsen.

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What tdawg87 said. DDLR was pretty damn good last year.

Simply looking at how many inherited runners DDLR allowed to score can be misleading without context. For example, how many outs were there when he came into the game? How many runners were on base? And where exactly were those baserunners at (3B? 2B? 1B?). Plus, sample issue.

Edited by Angels
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